To name ethnic or not to name ethnic that is the question

Kimberly - posted on 05/12/2012 ( 6 moms have responded )

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Studies show that is harder for people with ethnic names to get jobs, so with that be said did you/ will you chose to give your child a "so-called
ethnic name?"

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Keshia - posted on 03/31/2013

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I chose to give my children "normal" names but spelled differently. My son is Trystian (pronounced Tristan) and Ayvah (pronounced Ava). I love how they are spelled. But people dont say either one right...they pronounce Trystian with the same ending as Christian and Ayvah is A-vi-ya...its spelled bad enough...lol...i know..

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I thought about this, because I too have seen people miss out on jobs because the employer simply could not pronounce the name or assumed the person was a certain way or a certain race because of their name. My son's name is Euriah Dewayne. It was supposed to be Uriah, but his dad didn't like the name so to compromise I changed the spelling (he wanted him to have the same initials) and gave him his middle name even though I don't like it. My son is the ONLY person in the US right now with his name spelled that way (I looked it up on the Social Security registry). My daughter's name is Georgia Ann. Once again, could not agree o a name. She was named Georgia, after the state (because her dad loves it) and Ann comes from both sides of our families. I wanted my kids to have names that were "normal" but not popular. I have such a normal name and got so sick of being confused with other "Kristen"s I didn't want my kids dealing with that.

Katie - posted on 12/09/2012

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I have a degree in anthropology and I work with high risk kids.



I just created a posting on IMBD for some of my teens who like a particular actor who is of multiethnic decent like they are.



Is is specifically on ethnicity and is pro ethnicity since these Kids already know about race. Some of the kids consider themselves BI Racial but are looking for other ways to express themselves due to bullying.



you might want to check it out.



http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0589505/board...

Sheria - posted on 07/20/2012

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My parents were Muslims when I was a young child... It was a popular thing to be at that time (the 60's and 70's) especially in a larger city like New York where I was born. So they gave us all beautiful Arabic names with wonderful meanings... However, when I was about 10, they moved to a small town in North Carolina. We were ridiculed constantly because of our unusual names. And very few people were able to pronounce them correctly.

Because of my experiences, I chose to name my children very traditional names. The oldest one, Marvin Elijah, was named after their father. The other two, Joshua David and Jordan Michael, have such "normal" names that often they are not the only ones in an area with the same name. We once lived in an area where there were five people using the same library with my middle child's first and last name. And recently my youngest was waiting for a call back from a summer job program that did not come... He went to speak with the people who were hiring to find out why he was not called in, and he found that they were confused because another young man with the same first and last name already had a job with the company... They were wondering why he kept sending in his information when he was already hired. Thankfully my son also got a job with the company.

I do think that common names are easier for getting jobs, but today there are people of all ethnic groups who are giving their children more unique names. My granddaughter's name is Aliyah... a name that is both Hebrew (like most of my children's names) and Arabic (like mine). But that name is also becoming very popular. Some of my siblings chose to give their children Arabic names while others of us decide our children would have a better chance at getting their feet in the door with more traditional name. I now wonder if the next generation, children my granddaughter's age and your children's ages, will have less of a problem because of their diversity and their unique names. I hope that is true, but regardless, I believe a name should be strong and meaningful, not something made up because the parents thought it sounded interesting.

User - posted on 05/25/2012

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That did enter my mind. I have always heard that certain names make it harder. I have a son and his name is Atlas Ethan. I love it. It can be misleading to some people, but it is a strong name that came from a dear family member and that is what matter most.

Kimberly - posted on 05/12/2012

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I'll start the conversation off- I named my children Trinity, Kierran, and Channing. I think that my children have neutral names that could go either way. However, I have noticed that with my middle child (Kierran) who's name is Gaelic/Irish people often pronounce his name in a more "ethnic" way....like "Kye-ran. It's actually pronounced Kier-an like in the word "pier."

I've actually had a lady say to me "how do you pronounce his name, because you know yall
and them names." Hmmmphhh really!

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