do you sterilize your baby bottles?

Letitia - posted on 01/05/2012 ( 55 moms have responded )

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ive heard alot of mums dont worry about sterilizing anymore. if you did sterilize when did u decide to stop?

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Karen - posted on 01/06/2012

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i stopped sterilizing and went to hot soap & water with an air dry by about 6 months

Unlike Kellie, I don't think it's 'lazy or negligent' to stop sterilizing - think about it, once baby starts to explore and put things in their mouths while playing sterilizing their bottles really isn't going to do much....the other things they put in their mouths between bottles aren't going to be 100% sterilized 100% of the time....right? I know my son's favorite thing to get was shoes to chew on every chance he could get. Can't keep shoes sterilized, would the sterilized bottle be doing him much good at that point?



http://www.babycenter.ca/baby/formula/st...

Katherine - posted on 01/10/2012

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I think it all depends on how you and your partner have been raised.

We both work around food everyday (hubby is a chef and I work in daycare) and we sanitised and boiled water for formula bottles from the time he started a 8weeks until about 3.5 or 4 months - when he was really mobile and everything was in his mouth. Bottles and all pieces were washed after every used in hot soapy water, and water was not boiled after that time either, unless at my parents house as it makes me ill there ( I wouldn't want him to experience what I go through there)

I can't remember the last time I washed a soother - they fall, pick up, wipe on pant leg, give back - I'm helping him build up his immunity.

Maybe the rash your child has was caused by over sterilization of your childs environment??? too much clean stuff (bottles, nittles, soothers, etc etc etc) and then you go and give her something thats not sterilized and she reacts as it's basically a foriegn thing to her little body???

I never wanted a bubble child, he will NOT be a bubble child...hell he licks the stove, the dishwasher, the floor, sucks on the cats etc....he's a baby.....they grow immunities to things.....he has been using the same bottles washed out after every use with hot soapy water for about 6 months now - no issue!!!!

Kellie - posted on 01/10/2012

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That's hilarious Genny. I haven't actually judged or called anyone anything, and definitely haven't judged anyone on a personal level in this thread, if I had someone would have reported me and I would be in trouble.

I said the ACT of not sterilising your babies bottles, of not taking the time to sterilise your babies bottles is lazy and negligent. That is what I believe. It is my right to to believe so, especially given my yeas of food safety training.

If there wasn't any truth to that then people wouldn't get so bent out of shape in my opinion.

I hope no one has a differing opinion to you in any other communities Genny because it's going to be lonely in a community all on your own.

Jessica - posted on 01/17/2012

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I don't. I soak my twins' bottles in hot soapy water for a few minutes then I scrub them by hand, rinse and let them dry. I don't have a dishwasher so that is my only options. When the girls first came home I did boil the bottles every other day in addition to washing them, but I don't do that anymore and they are 11 months. I am hoping to get them on sippy cups soon so I don't have to wash bottles anymore!

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i stick everything in the dishwasher every chance i get otherwise I just wash the bottles, paci's in the sink with hot water.



Every bottle makes its way to the dishwasher once a week though. Just incase...

my lo is 10 months old.. even his sippy cups are in there.

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Sherri - posted on 02/12/2012

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I just used a bottle brush to clean the inserts for the sippy cups and we never used Dr. Brown bottles so I can't comment on that one. We don't have a dishwasher so that was never an option. If the sippy cups were especially gross I just soaked them overnight and cleaned with the bottle brush.

Danielle - posted on 02/12/2012

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Did anyone sterilize the inserts for say the sippy cups or the dr. brown bottles? Since they are so much smaller and seem impossible (when I used to deal with them all the time) to get them completely clean? Or did you just toss them in dishwasher/soak them? I just now remembered about them even though I already posted my opinions about sterilizing.

Sherri - posted on 02/12/2012

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We only sterilized the bottles the day they were bought and never again. Although we only use tap water too.

Nancy - posted on 02/11/2012

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We stopped sterilizing when he turned 1 - later than needed I'm sure. Lots of paranoia these days around germs and disease.....go with your instinct I say.

Erin - posted on 02/03/2012

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My son was born in May and came home in July. So I sterilized the bottles a lot then. Then whenever I would buy new bottles they would be sterlized. And then December came and my boyfriends son got sick so I decided it was back to sterilizing bottles to be safe. =)

Jennifer - posted on 02/02/2012

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I boiled mine before first use and now just soak in hot soapy water then wash all the pieces again with a brush and hot soapy water and air dry. We have hard water so I found after boiling them, it left a film so I had to hand wash anyway.

Miriam - posted on 01/23/2012

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LOL.. I noticed that too Victoria, it seams like the more careful and sterile you are the easier the kids get sick. I have a 9 year old same not sick, but got sick more than the twins who have had 1 ear infection in 12 months.. :+)

Victoria - posted on 01/21/2012

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I stopped when the twins were about 4 months old - I rinse in water and with bottle brush to get rid of any old milk and then put them on top shelf of dish washer. Or if I am in a hurry then just wash in soapy water, rinse and us. Never had a problem and kids have always been healthy. Sterilised to about 12 months with 1st son....he wasen't a sick boy at all but still had more sicknesses than twins who are healthy as horses

Miriam - posted on 01/19/2012

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thats good Edna but what about the sippy?? Its the same thing he puts them in his mouth and sucks on them :(

Edna - posted on 01/18/2012

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my son is 17months and i still put his bottles through the micro sterilizer, don't with his sippy cups thou.i think it's a personal choice and not for one to say what others should be doing, health visitors say anything from 6 months when your ready. think I'm just doing it out of habit more than anything.x

Miriam - posted on 01/18/2012

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Jessica, that's how we do our twins bottles, cups, pacifiers and even toys. very hot soapy water for a bit than scrub and wash, I have a dishwasher, but feel this cleans them much better :+)

Ingrid - posted on 01/18/2012

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My son is a year and 3 months. I STILL sterilize his bottles-soapy water and steam in microwave. I will stop sterilizing once he is off the bottle. Thats MY thought on sterlizing. Also heard that one can put bottles in dishwasher, which is great. Congrats with pregnancy.

Danielle - posted on 01/10/2012

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So I plan on breast feeding and for the first month for sure it will be exclusively baby and mommy time. So during that time I do plan to sterilize the bottles pacy's and all that stuff for the initial use for sure. As for after the initial use I do plan to sterilize the pump parts and storage containers at least once a week (sterilize sterilize). Plus I have dogs cats and ferrets so it won't be a bad thing to deep clean every so often. As for the pacy's I plan to throw them in the dish washer at least once a week as well or until I feel it isn't as much of a need.
What I'm getting at is an occasional sterilization is not a bad thing in my eyes, figure with all that will be going on whose to say you didn't miss a little something the first time. So a good deep clean is nice to do.

Kellie - posted on 01/10/2012

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Ahh ok thanks.

Well you won't get much debate from me even if you were looking for one, I support all that, the only thing I might disagree on would be the delayed solids as i think when they 'tell' you they're ready, why wait?

Lise - posted on 01/10/2012

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By all healthy things, I mean (and I REALLY am not trying to start a debate) - breastfeeding (extended or not), extended rear facing (support showing it's safer for baby), delayed beginning of solids, etc.

Kellie - posted on 01/10/2012

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I don't think you have been overly defensive Lise, but others have. And again I haven't actually called anyone lazy or negligent.

You had a few bottles, but the Mother who is a full time bottle feeder has many bottles. When we either chose to bottle feed or can't for whatever reason we chose to take on a little more 'work' than simply lifting up our top and latching baby to our breast.

I believe and always will believe that by not sterilizing you are putting your baby at an unnecessary risk. Like people always say, there will be evidence to support both sides of an argument. You have yours I have mine, and I in not way apologise for it.

What do you mean extend to all healthy things? You've lost me.

Lise - posted on 01/10/2012

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I don't think I'm overly defensive - I honestly don't think not sterilizing the few bottles a week when my milk was in them, fresh only, was a wrong decision and would do the same for the next baby. I *do* think it's rude to call someone lazy and negligent for not sterilizing bottles, however, when I have yet to see any research supporting the need to. Recent, peer reviewed research.

So would that extend to all healthy things? I'm not going to go into that - that would make this a debate! :) But I am curious.

Kellie - posted on 01/10/2012

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Lmao, you need to come and see my house. There was no over sterilization of anything. The only things that got Sterilised were her bottles and Dummies and she was crawling from 5.5 months.

I don't consider sterilizing her bottles to be either over sterilizing her environment or putting her in a bubble, I consider it good food handling/hygiene.

Sweetheart I was raised by Heroin Addicts, well as much as a heroin addict can raise a child so you can imagine what I was raised in, until I was 7 anyway..

Fiona - posted on 01/10/2012

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I sterlize my 17 months old daughter bottles after each use. I wash them and then boil

Miriam - posted on 01/10/2012

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I have 12 month old twins. we sterilized before the first use and just periodicatlly the nipples. I do not boil the water for formula or to drink use bottled water. I have two very healthy baby boys!! also have a 9 year old who sterilized everything for and he is also and has very healthy. thats just what I chose!!

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Kellie, you are incredibly judgmental...calling people lazy and negligent when it comes to conscious decisions they have made for their families is not helpful. Perhaps you need a lesson in relating to adults. When you judge people like that it makes them defensive and it makes them not want to listen to you. I am withdrawing from this group mainly because of your tone. I will not subject myself to communities with people who do not support one another.

Kellie - posted on 01/09/2012

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One can only hope! She's a funny little thing, she won't do anything she doesn't want to do, brushing teeth and food are both things I don't want to be a battle, it's more detrimental than helpful. So far all good with the food, the kid doesn't stop eating, really must get onto the teeth brushing, it's harder for me to to get that into a routine as I have never had one and I totally want her to have that down unlike me.

Lise - posted on 01/09/2012

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You can just make it so it's a requirement. We've been brushing her teeth every night for so long now, it's just routine. But if your lo is anything like mine, she'll want to brush FOR the toothpaste!

Kellie - posted on 01/09/2012

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oh really? My partner wants to start, I have the brush there and baby grade toothpaste, but I want her to get familiar with the toothbrush before introducing the toothpaste, because if she hates it I'll never get the damn toothbrush in her mouth again!

I made the mistake of putting Cow's Milk in her Sippy, she wouldn't have a bar of it, then when I washed it and put water back into it I had to shove it in her mouth so she could taste that it was water and "safe" again! Little turd lol

Lise - posted on 01/09/2012

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Ah. DD got her fist tooth at 10.5 mo, but we've been brushing since 6 months old. :)

Kellie - posted on 01/09/2012

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Oh well that may be the difference in our arguments then Lise, I've had to formula feed and I make her bottles up the night before so they're there when I need them for the next day. So her formula is sitting in the bottle in the fridge for about 12 hours (I think) and I don't reuse, if she doesn't finish her bottle the remainder gets tossed, that's another omg NO thing for me.

I'm considering not giving this next one a Dummy, it's a pain in the ass when they want it and they've got a cold and can't breathe, but I digress..

The toothbrush not an issue, she only got her first 2 teeth at like 8 months then didn't get the other 6 until just after she turned 12 months, so we haven't got into that yet and like you I will replace it frequently.

Last place we had had a dishwasher so that took care of the sterilising, this place doesn't but again she was 12 months before that stopped too.

I am not a germ-a-phobe by any stretch, man the things she's managed to get in her mouth...and EVERYTHING goes in her mouth, but food handling, equipment handing, etc etc are very important. I think you'll find too that in the counter articles supporting the non sterilisation of bottles they usually say it's "probably" not needed or "most likely ok not to" they don't actually commit to saying, hey, don't bother it's definitely ok to not sterilise.

Food poisoning is NOT fun, and in such a little being it could be fatal, and I'm just not willing to risk it. Not for 10 minutes of my time to prevent it.

Lise - posted on 01/09/2012

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I sterilized for the NICU baby because she was a preemie and her immune system was compromised. I sterilized for the older baby because, though she was older and healthy, she had been been early and (mostly) she wasn't my baby. Had I ever used formula, I may have sterilized for that - breast milk has built-in antibodies that do not worry me as much. And her milk never just sat in bottles - she drank them and they were immediately refrigerated again. Breast milk stays fresh for a good amount of time when kept cool.



So you sterilized pacifiers and your baby's hands - what about forks, spoons, etc.? Toothbrush?



(Just adding - my dd never used a pacifer, so no need to sterilize. Never sterilize her tooth brush, but we do replace it frequently.)

Kellie - posted on 01/09/2012

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She's 13 months, I don't sterilise her Dummies anymore, not sure when I stopped that, probably around 12 months. Although I do chuck them in the steriliser with their bottles every now and again.

My point is, that the baby's milk is SITTING in possibly (unless it's been sterilised) contaminated bacteria ridden bottles, because again, just because it's clean to the naked eye, doesn't mean it IS clean and free from harmful bacteria. This is why we use colour coded chopping boards.

When she was an infant I did use a hand sanitiser/steriliser, now just wash like normal. Like I said, I tried to stop the sterilisation step and she came out in a rash around her mouth, as soon as I started sterilising her bottles again, poof, rash gone... and BELIEVE me I know how to wash dishes!

So if her bottles were clean and all fine and dandy (which to my eyes they definitely looked), what was with the rash?

If there is no merit to my argument then why did you worry about sterilising for the NICU baby or the older baby? by your reasoning and argument it's not necessary.

Lise - posted on 01/09/2012

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They ARE - you teach them to wash their hands just as you wash their bottles. You don't sterilize their hands, nor to their bottles ever come in contact with pets, fecal matter, etc. - as their hands do. From that perspective, their hands are much dirtier than bottles. Do I have my dd wash her hands AND use sanitizer (as we would be doing with the bottles)? No.



I DID sterilize when I pumped to donate to a NICU baby. I sterilized weekly when pumping for donation to an older baby (pump parts). Had my daughter been ill, had a compromised immune system, gotten thrush, etc., I would have sterilized then.



Do you sterilize your child's toothbrush? (Not trying to be bitchy - I am honestly curious.) Pacifiers? Cups, plates, etc.?

Kellie - posted on 01/09/2012

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The part about the BPA is irrelevant as you'd be hard pressed to find anything still made with BPA. It's all BPA free thes days.

My entire working life I have worked in hospital and aged care kitchens and have done 5billion and 654thousand safe food handling and the like courses. Safe food handling practices are ingrained in me. Sterelising and boiling you infants water and bottles is an important step this.

Why, if none of this matters, if by not practicing safe food/equipment handling we are building our children's immune systems, do wet each them to wash their hands before eating their dinner? Because in your arguments (not just yours Lise) this is not necessary, I mean after all they're touching and sucking on who knows what during the course of the day..

Lise - posted on 01/09/2012

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And yet...

"In the old days when water supplies were not reliably clean, it made sense to sterilize baby bottles. But now, sterilizing bottles, nipples, and water is mostly unnecessary."
http://www.webmd.com/parenting/baby/shou...

"Health care providers have varying advice on this, as I said, but studies as far back as the '50s have indicated that there is no need for routine sterilization of bottles beyond hot soapy water or time in a dishwasher. In fact, with the issues of BPA, it's been noted that sterilization via boiling can actually cause bottles to leach this out quicker."
http://babyparenting.about.com/od/nutrit...

Karen - posted on 01/09/2012

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@ rebekah - i don't think it is considered sterilizing to put them through the dishwasher. i think they actually have to be boiled or put in the microwave in one of the sterilizing containers.
You can find information to back up both sides of this...moral is, just like every aspect of parenting, you do what you think is right for your family.

Dr. Robert Steele (a board-certified pediatrician) about sterilizing not being necessary and why. (He also recommends sterilizing in the case of well water, though). Also, the following other medical sources agree that sterilizing bottles (outside of the first use and, of course, providing your water supply is safe) is not necessary when they are cleaned properly:

•Dr. Vincent Iannelli, Pediatrics Guide and board-certified pediatrician, in his article "Common Pediatric and Parenting Myths" -- "If you live in a city with sanitized water and you are preparing bottles one at a time, then boiling water or sterilizing the bottles and nipples probably isn't necessary. You can use this water out of the tap and bottles can be washed in hot soapy water or in the dishwasher. If you are not convinced that your water supply is safe or if you are using well water, then you should boil the water for five minutes before preparing formula."
•Dr. Ari Brown, Harvard-trained pediatrician in her book Baby 411 -- "You don't need to sterilize the bottles after the first time you take them out of the package ... Sterilizing bottles and boiling water are all based on the kitchen chemistry our mothers and grandmothers performed to prepare formula in the olden days."
•Dr. Glade B. Curtis, board-certified OB/GYN and co-director of Health Clinics of Utah, says in his book Your Baby's First Year -- "There is no need to sterilize bottles on a regular basis unless you use well water. In that case, boil bottles and nipples for 5 minutes."
•From WebMd: "In the old days when water supplies were not reliably clean, it made sense to sterilize. But now, sterilizing bottles, nipples, and water is mostly unnecessary. Unless your water supply is suspected to harbor contaminated bacteria, it is as safe for your baby as it is for you. There is no reason to sterilize what is already safe."
•The American Academy of Family Physicians: "You should sterilize bottles and nipples before you use them for the first time. You can do this by putting them in boiling water for 5 minutes. After that first time, you probably don't need to sterilize them again. Instead, wash bottle, nipples and caps in hot, soapy water. Rinse them carefully. You can also run them through the dishwasher, which kills more germs than washing by hand."
•KidsHealth.org: "Yes. Before the first use, you'll need to sterilize nipples and bottles in a rolling boil for 1 to 5 minutes. You can also sterilize them with a store-bought countertop or microwaveable sterilizer, but boiling works just as well and costs nothing. After that, you'll need to wash bottles and nipples in hot, soapy water (or run them through the dishwasher) before every use."
(taken from http://babyparenting.about.com/b/2008/06...)

Kellie - posted on 01/09/2012

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If the temperature of the hot water rinse cycle is above 65* Celcius then yes, it does count as sterilising Rebekah.

Kellie - posted on 01/09/2012

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Yeah it's called Salmonella Sarah..



"During the first year of your baby’s life, he’s at his most vulnerable to illnesses. If you don’t sterilise your baby’s bottles, viruses, bacteria and parasites can gather on his bottle and in his milk and make him ill. Your baby could develop anything from mild thrush to a more serious bout of vomiting and diarrhoea."



http://www.babycenter.com.au/baby/formul...



"Now that my baby is sitting and crawling by herself, does it become pointless to sterilise the bottles, teats, soothers and

breast pump, especially since she often puts objects in her mouth that have been lying on the floor?



“No, we recommend that you continue to sterilise even when your baby starts to crawl and pick up objects from the floor. Your baby is likely to swallow many more bacteria from unclean feeding products than she will encounter while crawling on the floor. Also, some of the types of bacteria that might be found in feeding products are potentially more harmful than the bacteria she is likely to encounter while crawling on the floor.”



http://www.philips.co.nz/consumerfiles/p...



I stand by my initial statement, not sterilising your Baby's bottles is lazy and negligent. You ARE putting your baby at risk of serious illness and possible death.



Just because something is clean to the naked eye, doesn't mean it IS clean and free from harmful bacteria.

Sarah - posted on 01/09/2012

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I've had 3 kids and i sterilized evey bottle until they moved onto a drink cup. There is a certain bacteria that remain in the bottles and your baby hasnt developed an immunity tat comes later. U dont sterilize your bottle your baby could die. Also use sterilized water

Lori - posted on 01/07/2012

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We didn't have to sterilize bottles. We used the ones with the drop-in liners. They were helpful since we could push out all of the extra air that causes so much gassiness. We did sterilize the nipples before the first use and washed them with HOT, soapy water after each use. We would boil them about once a week just to cover our bases. Nothing major. My hubby is a scientist and is big about the child getting exposed to germs to help boost the immune system. He doesn't mean to sit her in the middle of a big trash pile or anything like that. He just knows that you can't kid your kids away from every germ and expect them to stay healthy their whole life. They need to be exposed to these things.

Katherine - posted on 01/07/2012

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I bf for the first 2 months, then ff, I sterilized my bottles until about 3.5 - 4 months old, when i started feeding him solids and he was mobile and putting everything into his mouth!!

I figured the extra germs he may get from them will help his immune system!!! Besides, he couldn't possibly get more germs from his bottle then he does from licking the floor, the windows, the walls, sucking on the cat....lol

They do however still get washed nightly with hot soapy water or rinsed and thrown into the dish washer

Lise - posted on 01/07/2012

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I didn't go back to work until dd was 4 months old, so I only sterilized before the first use. Any time my milk was left in the bottles too long and it soured, I'd sterilize again. Other than that, super hot, soapy water until she was 11 months and went to cups.

Sharon - posted on 01/06/2012

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At about 7mths I stopped, with both the boys...and Kellie Browne I am NOT a lazy or negligent parent for doing this!!

I stopped doing it then as they were both so active exploring anything & everything and putting anythign they could find in their mouths. I just wash with hot soapy water, and dry with a paper towel. Same as I do for our dishes, but in the sink, not the dishwasher as I like to wash them seperately to our normal dishes that sometimes can be greasy.



The reason we stopped at this age was because they were both crawling around the floor and putting anything they can in their mouths.

Karen - posted on 01/06/2012

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Yes I noticed the film after finishing a bottle of formula, however, once I washed my bottles the film was gone...they were clean. All it takes is a good dish soap, hot water and a good scrubbing. Using your cutting board analogy - do you sterilize your boards after you use them each time or just wash them with hot soapy water? I know I don't sterilize them...I wash them. I certainly wouldn't have fed my son out of a still dirty bottle. However, kudos to you for sterilizing for so long, it works for you and your family. Good luck with breastfeeding, hope it goes well for you

Kellie - posted on 01/06/2012

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If you don't sterilise (particularly from birth) you risk your bottles being contaminated. If you've ever noticed the formula leave a film inside the bottles and washing then sterilizing them eliminates the risk of cross contamination

Nobodies saying keep your environment Steriliser, I'm talking about sterilizing their bottles, you know the vessel for their food? For me not sterilizing is tantamount to chopping raw chicken on a chopping board then not getting a new one to cut cooked meat on.

But your babies, your, well really, their risk. They have a right to safety.

I'm hoping to successfully breastfeed this time, bu if I can't I won't risk my child's life by not taking 10 minutes out of my day to sterilise their bottles.

Letitia - posted on 01/06/2012

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Thanks guys. I was just curious because I read another question like this and alot of mums commented that they didn't sterilize from day one. I have No problem with it but I'm pregnant again and wanted to know. I guess It's just to with What your comfortable.

Rebekah - posted on 01/06/2012

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What's considered sterilizing? I boiled them the first time, but then just put them in the dishwasher.

Stephanie - posted on 01/06/2012

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I stopped sterilizing my daughter's bottles when she was 4 months. I was just using the Avent sterilizer that you put in the microwave for a couple of minutes. I read somewhere that after the first time you wash them, sterilizing is not actually necessary.

[deleted account]

I read an interesting article about the over-sterilization of a baby's environment and how this does more harm than good. Babies need to introduce the bacteria from their environments into their systems so their immune systems can grown strong. Babies who have everything sterilized tend to get sicker as children and adults.

That said, the question was really about bottles. I wash with soapy water and put them in the dishwasher. I don't think it is lazy either...I made a conscious choice not to over-sterilize my baby's life and I extended this to her bottles. I EBF and she only gets one bottle per day, but I don't boil it or use a sterilizer.

Kellie - posted on 01/05/2012

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My daughter is 13 months old and I STILL wash (with soapy water), rinse and sterilise her bottles in my Avent electric Steriliser.

I tried to stop the Sterilising step when she was about 9 months but she started getting a rash around her mouth so I started and have continued to sterilise her bottles.

I think stopping sterilising your babies bottles before at LEAST 9 months is lazy and negligent. There is a reason why we sterilise their bottles and boil the water to mix with their formula. My baby's life is worth me taking 10 minutes to wash, rinse and sterilise her bottles.

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