CARSEAT

Carrie - posted on 01/22/2010 ( 139 moms have responded )

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Can anyone tell me the right age for a baby to be in a front facing car seat???

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Stacey - posted on 01/25/2010

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It is best to keep your child rear facing as long as possible. The latest recommendation is actually 18 months, however, studies are proving it's best to keep children rear facing until they actually grow to the max weight of the car seat (usually somewhere around 30-35 pounds). A friend of mine posted this on her facebook wall a few months ago and even if he doesn't like it, my son Will, is going to be rear facing until he's too big for his carseat. The video is about 6 minutes long and definitely worth watching. It will pull at the heart strings, but may influence your decision as to when you put your child front facing.

Merry - posted on 03/03/2010

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Mikkii , Eric was 20 lbs at 4 months. He is still rear facing. His seat can be used rear facing up to 35 lbs 35! And up to 34 inches! He needs not face forwards until he is 21 months if he remains at the 97th percentile for height. Or until he is 2 years old if he is in the 95th percentile for weight. If YOUR carseat doesn't allow for rear facing until these sizes then get a new one. I am so sick of loving mommies taking risks in the car.

Maria ferrecchia my son was 20 lbs at four months do you really want to say that he was ready to face forward? Honestly watch the videos and imagine yourbaby being decapitated.

Michelle o'brien if you put your six month old forward this sickens me to no end. Do you realize that you are putting yourbaby in a seriously dangerous place??? If YOURcarseat doesn't acomodate rear facing until 35 lbs and 34 inches then getanew carseat!!!!! This isnotrocket science ladies the facts are in. Every company reccommends rear facing fir as long as possible. Somepediatritions don't have a clue about the safest way to travel. Look into the crashtest findings and put your babies and toddlers backwards.!



Let's make rear facing like breastfeeding.....

The longer the healthier the baby!!!!!!!!



I'm hoping to make it to 2 years for both.



Please. No hate comments towards me all I want isfor us to help babies stay saafe in the car.

[deleted account]

RF ing limits in the US is ONE AND 20 LBS, not 1 or the other!! Besides some carseats has specifics on weight/height on rf ing & ff ing...I would suggest reading ALL carseat manuals for carseat that you own!

My son was changed from RFing to FF ing in Dec 2009 (would have kept him RFing longer but his legs would fall asleep. He was 2 1/2 yrs old when I switched him...he was 35 in. and 26 lbs at his 2 yr WBV. He's also in a 1st yrs true fit...which has rf ing limits of 35 lbs and ff ing to 65 lbs (extended harnessing).

People SHOULD NOT be turning their children around before a year old...they do NOT have the neck strength for an accident while FF ing!

Ashley - posted on 04/05/2010

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Does anyone have a mirror to place on the headrest of the backseat? I have a cheap one and it has been a huge help. I can see everything that my son is doing. He has started to figure out how to see me too.
Plus if you get a fancy one with toys and music it will entertain them during the drive. Your child needs to be rear facing according to the law. Don't break the law just because they are happier front facing. You are the parent and they are the child, we do what is best for our children even if they don't like it.

Amanda - posted on 04/05/2010

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better his legs the neck or spine and in most cases the legs will not break

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Crystal - posted on 04/09/2011

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it is scary how many posts i read that say i turned my baby way before 1yr that is so sad and it's mostly convinince for the parents saftey 1st in my opinion my youngest is 20 months 23lbs 32in and ERF her saftey is waaaaay more important to me than comfort or my conveinece

Tammi - posted on 04/07/2010

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Older cars did not come equipped with the "anchors" at the top of the seat. I have a 97 vehicle and it doesn't have it. It was not a standard until 2002.

Tresha - posted on 04/07/2010

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i was told the baby has to be over 20 lbs... cause of the head support of the baby and not near an air bag .

Kathryn - posted on 04/07/2010

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Its safer to keep them in the rear facing for aslong as possable, rather broken legs than a broken kneck is what i was told. they say at 1 or over 20lbs but they are able to stay in the rearfacing aslong as there heads not over the top of the seat.

Sarah - posted on 04/07/2010

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they are happier facing forward...BUT it is much safer facing back...even after age one,20lb...whatever. I Switched my first 2 at a year, but I'm waiting fir my 3rd until he no linger fits comfortably rear facing. I've just watched enough test videos showing the dangers of facing forward.

Marie - posted on 04/06/2010

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Hi,



the rules really depend on where you live (so you need to check legislation for your country/state). I currently live in Australia and here they seem to allow forward facing travel from 9 kg. In Sweden, however, they recommend that children travel in a rearward facing chair until they are four. The reason being that the child's head is, until that age, un-proportionally heavy, and thus in an accident they are much more prone to neck injuries if they travel forward. I read on a Swedish website that rearward travel seats have a injury reduction effect of 90% and forward facing seats 40-50%. It all makes sense from a physical point of view to let children travel in a rearward facing chair. However, as I said early on ... you need to follow the law of where you live. In my case, I have to use an Australian child seat and therefore I have to let my child travel in a forward facing chair. If I was you I'd keep my child in a child seat that allowed rearward facing travel as long as possible - they might enjoy the views traveling forward but in an accident they are much more safe if they don't.



Marie

Dannielle - posted on 04/06/2010

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I have looked into it and everything I have read says to hold off as long as possible as rear facing is so much safer. My little guy started to have length issues so we had to turn him around.

Kimberly - posted on 04/05/2010

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I've seen that video before, and even though my DD is one year old today and 20+lbs, she will rear face until she is at least 2. I'd rather have a crabby baby than a dead or injured one. Sometimes being a parent means doing the unpopular thing with your kids because it's the safer thing.

Erin - posted on 04/05/2010

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My concern is this: my daughter will be 1 in 2 weeks, but she's still not quite 20 lbs... she's pretty long though and her feet are dangling off the end of the rear-facing carseat. We're worried that if we have to stop suddenly or anything and her carseat kicks back against the seat it will injure her ankles.

[deleted account]

I turned my daughter around before she was a year old. It was somewhere in the 6-8 month area. She could support herself well enough AND it made her happier. It also really depends on how big your baby is. When my brother was a baby, my mom turned him around when he was 5 months old, because his legs were hitting the back seat and he was getting squished. Natalie likes the extra space. Her birthday is the fifteenth of this month and she's done perfectly fine ever since I've turned her around. I also liked it better because it was easier to see her and reach her.

Amanda - posted on 04/05/2010

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forgot to metion check the carseat for weight limits, infant carriers usually only hold weight up to 22 some 25 lbs and convertables have two weights one for rearfacing and one forward facing. Also check your carseat expiration especially if you recieved yours used or used for multiple children all carseats have an expiration date because the materials break down and the carseat becomes unsafe. Also toss the carseat if it has ever been in an accident even with no children in the car the seatbelt used to restrain the carseat can damage the carseat in any type of accident

Amanda - posted on 04/05/2010

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The law is one year and 20 lbs both. However recommendations are as long as they dont fuss keep them rear facing. The older and bigger they get the stronger their neck muscles. While facing the back the entire carseat is protecting them during an accident, when facing forward the straps are the only thing protecting them. If they neck is not strong enough during the impact of the accident the babies/toddlers neck could break.

Nadene - posted on 04/04/2010

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i got told by the clinic nurse that they have to be 8kgs and up before they can go forwards facing, bu facing bckwards is safer!

Stephanie - posted on 04/04/2010

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Laurette, are you kidding me? 3-4 months old for forward facing? That baby would be in serious danger!

Shoshana - posted on 04/04/2010

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http://community.babycenter.com/groups/a...



The importance of rear-facing (Extended Rear-Facing aka ERF)



Why you should consider rear-facing your child past the minimum of 1 year and 20 pounds to the new standard of 2 years and 30 pounds



“Rear-facing – Unmatched Safety” A fairly comprehensive article from CPSafety.com http://www.cpsafety.com/articles/stayrea...







MSN Article “Child Car Seat Advice Questioned” http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9916868/



Joel’s Journey – a website started by Joel’s grandfather when he was injured while FF in a crash http://www.joelsjourney.org/







You Tube Video “Benefits of Keeping Baby Rear-facing”







Another You Tube Video about ERF:











“Why Rear-Facing is Safest” A fairly comprehensive article from Car-Safety.org http://www.car-safety.org/rearface.html







Rear Facing Seats – Yet another fairly comprehensive article for thecarseatlady.com http://www.thecarseatlady.com/car_seats/...







Pictures of How a Child’s Spine Develops http://www.windsorpeak.com/vbulletin/sho...







AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) Policy



http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi...



Highlight of the policy - for optimal protection, the child should remain rear facing until reaching the maximum weight for the car safety seat, as long as the top of the head is below the top of the seat back



AAP news article about RF to 2



http://aapnews.aappublications.org/cgi/c...



Although this isn’t policy at this point, the AAP is working on developing a new policy, which hopefully will more strongly encourage RF







BBC New article about RF http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/809482...







Why RF is Safest Even in Rear End Collisions



One Family’s Story of Being Rear-Ended While at a Stop by a Car Traveling at 60-65mph http://myangelsaliandpeanut.tripod.com/i...







Check out this video for some great information and crash test footage...you'll see the HUGE difference:



And this one has lots of pictures of older rear-facing kiddos:



And here’s another great link:



http://www.childrestraintsafety.com/rear...







European study showing that rear-facing is better through age 4: http://www.anec.eu/attachments/ANEC-R&T-...



www.celebrity-babies.com/2008/04/rearfacing-car.html



Celebrity Baby Blog rear-facing article written by BC regular Andrea (BookMama).



www.CarSeatSite.com/rf.htm



CarSeatSite.com’s explanation of why rear-facing is safest.







Portions written by Sam-Pacey-&-Joshua, compiled by Trisha (mamato3monkeys) and submitted by Dia (May04 Feb06)

Shoshana - posted on 04/04/2010

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Rear facing is safest

By Carseatjunkie



http://www.cafemom.com/group/5739/forums...



Car crashes are the #2 killer of children under 1 year of age. Car crashes are the #1 killer of children 1-14.



The absolute bare minimum is 1 year AND 20lbs. What is best practice? To keep your child rear facing for as long as possible. The AAP recommends keeping your child rfing until the weight limits of your seat which is either 30, 33 or 35lbs. Another thing, MOST states have LAWS in place that say your child HAS to be in a rear facing child restraint until 1 year AND 20lbs. So ANY dr telling you that it is okay to FF them before 1 year is WRONG.



I am a Child Passenger Safety Technician and I all too often see the horrific aftermaths of children who were forward facing and were involved in a car accident. Most recently, we reviewed a case study of a 26 month old, 26lbs child who was in the middle of the backseat, ffing, in a 5 pt harness seat. A car came into their lane and they were in a head on collision at 45mph. This little girl suffered a broken C2 vertebrae. She was the LUCKIEST child. She was in a HALO for 3 months. She had to into temporary state custody b/c the mother couldn't care for her (due to the mother being in the hospital). Evidence shows that if she were still rear facing, she would not have sustained this life threatening injury.



I have had a broken neck before, my C1 and C2 vertebrae's were broken. This area controls breathing, movements, etc...Christopher Reeve is a prime example of having a broken C1 and C2 vertebra in his neck. It is NOT a nice injury and I would never wish that upon anyone...especially a child. It breaks my heart when I hear of parents ffing their child too soon. Because of this kind of mind set that it is a "milestone" to ff your child at 1 year AND 20lbs, many MANY children are needlessly injured.



When a child is in a frontal, head on 35mph crash and their car seat is NOT tethered and they are using a 5 point harness, they will go forward 32". When their seat is tethered, a child will be thrown forward 28". It is imperative that families recognize the NEED to keep their children rear facing for as long as possible.



Here are several links to support keeping your child rear facing for as long as possible.



http://www.joelsjourney.org



http://www.anec.eu/attachments/ANEC-R&T-...

http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi...

http://www.carseat.org/Resources/633.pdf

http://www.cpsafety.com/articles/stayrea...

http://www.car-safety.org/rearface.html

http://www.cpsafety.com/articles/RFAlbum...

http://www.thecarseatlady.com/car_seats/...

http://myangelsaliandpeanut.tripod.com/i...

http://momtoaliandshae.tripod.com/keepin...

http://www.aap.org/family/carseatguide.h...

http://www.aap.org/family/1to2yrs.htm

http://www.aap.org/advocacy/releases/tra...



http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9916868

http://www.carseatsite.com/rear-face_art...



Here's an article reinforcing WHY Rear facing is BEST

http://www.stuff.co.nz/4144421a10.html



Here are a few crash test links to show you the difference in rear facing vs forward facing:



http://www.oeamtc.at/netautor/html_seite...







Here is a crash test of a 12 month old RFing

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v163/j...¤t=video06A_MGA_213_RearFace-Convertib.flv



Then, here is the SAME 12 month old FFing

http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v163/j...¤t=video06B_MGA_213_ForwardFace-Conver.flv



For those who say their children were uncomfortable rfing, your child knows nothing different. In fact, their legs bending the way they do RFing is actually comfortable to a child. It may not be for an adult. A child is usually more uncomfortable with their legs dangling over the edge or close to the edge of the seat than they are all "squished" up. ALL children go through the kicking, screaming, yelling phase b/c they are active, crawling, walking, etc and would much rather be doing that than harnessed in their seat. They also WANT to see mom or dad in the car. They can hear you, but can't "see" you. They are all phases and they will pass. A child is TOO tall rfing when their head is 1" below the top of the SHELL of the seat OR (check your car seat manual) if you own an older Britax, it is when the tips of the ears are even with the shell of the seat rfing. There are NO documented cases of a child's legs being broken in crashes, but there are TONS of documented cases of children with spinal injuries.

42% of accidents occur in rural settings. 25% of them occur within 5 minutes of your home.



Autopsy reports have shown that children under 2 years old are at 4 times the risk of Internal Decapitation when forward facing. What is Internal Decapitation??



Wikipedia says this:

Internal decapitation, atlantooccipital dislocation, describes the rare process by which the skull separates from the spinal column during severe head injury. This injury is nearly always fatal, since it usually involves nerve damage or severance of the spinal cord. Hanging relies on allowing the subject to break their neck under their own weight.





Here is a lady that actually survived Internal Decapitation



So, as you can tell, it has ZERO to do with neck STRENGTH. I was in a side impact crash where the drunk driver was going 65-70mph and it snapped my neck--I was 20 years old.



Did you know that if YOU are in a 30mph, one vehicle accident and your child weighs 20lbs, they turn into 600lbs of force. THAT is a LOT of force for a child.



Consider this: A car going 40mph would hit a tree with the same force as hitting the ground after falling off a 50 foot cliff. A person inside the car would hit the windshield (unrestrained, of course) with the same force as hitting the ground after a fall from a five-story building.



Another thing to know is that when a child is RFing, the BACK of their carseat--the part that goes behind their back and head--take the brunt of the crash force. In a FF car seat, the CHILD takes the brunt of the crash force.



This shows spine development. You can see how the spine doesn't fuse together until they are quite older.

user posted image





This diagram shows you how "top heavy" children are and how disproportioned they are.

user posted image



I understand that it is ultimately the parent's decision, but I want to make sure that the information is out there for the parent to make the decision. No one needs to feel bad or scared or worried. Here is the information. Some crashes are unsurvivable no matter what safety precautions have been taken. But, I WANT your children just as safe as YOU do. I am VERY passionate about child passenger safety and child safety in general.

Amanda - posted on 04/04/2010

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I have checked and in Queensland you can turn baby around to forward facing at 6 months and 8 kilos (not 12 months as suggested). I agree with most comments that it is much safer to keep baby rear facing for as long as possible.

Shoshana - posted on 04/04/2010

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For those of us with small children it's our job to keep them safe. Did you know that vehicle accidents are the number one cause of death for children under 14? That means that riding in the car is THE MOST dangerous thing your child can do. And they probably do it every day. We can't eliminate all danger fom our lives, but there are things we can do to minimize risk. Here are some very important ways to keep our kids safer in the car.

1) KNOW YOUR MANUAL – While car seat installation isn’t difficult, you do need to consult the manual to learn how to install your particular car seat. Keep your manual in a safe place so you can easily refer to it in the future. Understand the weight AND height limits of the car seat (kids typically outgrow by height first).

2) POSITION OF THE HARNESS – The shoulder harness must be at or below your child’s shoulders for rear facing, at or above for forward facing. Kids grow fast, check the position on the first of each month and after growth spurts.

3) IT’S A CHEST CLIP, NOT A BELLY CLIP – The top of the chest clip should be aligned with the armpits.

4) SNUG AS A HUG – Make sure the straps are tightened properly. Rule of thumb: you shouldn’t be able to pinch a horizontal fold in the strap.

5) UNDERSTAND HOW TO USE LATCH – In most cases “borrowing” outboard LATCH to install the car seat in the center is not acceptable. Approved LATCH positions should be outlined in your vehicle manual. Also, car seats are not meant to be installed using both the LATCH and a seat belt at the same time. One or the other, not both.

6) LATCH HAS A LIMIT – In most cars, you can’t use the LATCH system after 40lbs. Check your vehicle manual or contact a Certified Passenger Safety Technician.

7) EACH STEP UP IN CAR SEATS IS A STEP DOWN IN SAFETY – The longer your child can stay in each step, the better. This includes rear facing, harnessing, and staying in a high back booster (or even a backless booster) until the fit of the seat belt without the booster is better than with.

8) EXTENDED REAR FACING – Toddlers riding forward facing are five times more likely to be seriously injured or killed than if they are riding rear facing. For this reason, the American Academy of Pediatrics states that toddlers should remain rear-facing until they have reached the maximum height and weight of the seat, or at least the age of 2 years. Yes, your child’s feet will touch the seat back; however this is perfectly safe since the forces in an accident are typically directed to the front or side of the car. Legs are actually more likely to be broken forward facing than rear-facing…and besides a broken leg is better than a broken neck!

9) EXTENDED HARNESSING – Child passenger safety advocates recommend harnessing past the 4 year and 40lb legal minimum, up until 6 years old. At 6 years, a child’s bones are more solid and mature to take crash forces from a seat belt, a child is better able to sit properly in a booster, and a child is more able to understand the importance of keeping a seat belt in place.

10) OUT OF THE BOOSTER – Your child should remain in a booster at a minimum until she can pass the five point test http://www.carseat.org/Boosters/630.pdf. High back boosters are recommended over backless boosters because they provide side impact protection, artificial hips, and tend to better position children in the seat.

11) COLD WEATHER CLOTHING – The filler in that adorable, bulky snowsuit prevents you from getting a tight fit with the straps. In an accident the filler will compress leaving your child essentially with loose harnesses that may not be able to restrain her. Don’t believe it? Try this test: strap your child in with her jacket on, unclick the strap, take off the jacket, reclick the strap. Did you have to tighten it? If so, the jacket is too puffy. Use a thinner jacket, like fleece.

12) EXPIRATION DATES – No it’s not a container of milk, but car seats do expire. The hot/cold cycling fatigues the plastic and it no longer has the original strength. The expiration date and/or manufacture date are stamped right onto the seat. Check your manual for more information. Also, a car seat “expires” when it’s been in any accident.

13) YOU LOCKED THE CAR DOORS….NOW WHAT ABOUT THE CAR SEAT? – If your child’s car seat is installed using the vehicle seat belts, you must check to make sure the seat belts will lock in a crash. Check your car seat manual and vehicle manual to understand what kind of seat belts your vehicle has and if you need to use a locking clip. Locking clips can be tricky to use. Here is a helpful reference: http://www.carseatsite.com/lockingclips....

14) USED CAR SEATS – It’s safe to utilize a used car seat only if you know the full history of the seat and have completed the used car seat checklist: http://www.cpsafety.com/articles/usedsea...

15) DON’T LET YOUR CHILD BE A CRASH TEST DUMMY – Car seats are not often tested with add-on products such as strap pads, seat belt tightening devices, head cushions, car seat covers, or pads to contain diaper leaks. These items can interfere with harnesses and you should not use any of these products without the approval of the car seat manufacturer.

Shoshana - posted on 04/04/2010

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2 is the new 1.



By Seattle mama doc



http://seattlechildrens.org/seattle-mama...



2 is the new 1.



This is kind of like, "brown is the new black." But different and more important.



Two is the new one. When you're a toddler. And when you're at least 20 pounds.



And you're in the car.



Let me explain. This is important for a number of reasons. One, not a lot of people (even pediatricians) know this yet because new data hasn’t been incorporated into policy statements. And two, it could save lives. Three and four: it could save lives.



Listen up and tell your friends. Scream from the rooftops.



There is good news and bad news to this story. The bad news first, of course…you're not going to be advised to turn your little one-year-old forward facing in the 5-point car seat until they are two years of age. Yes, yes, I know, you did that with your other child. So did I. I didn't know any better. We evolve, science moves forward, new findings surface. And we now realize facing-forward is a no-good-right-of-passage for a 1 year old.



Keep your 1 year old rear-facing. Or go into your car and turn that seat back around. Then pass go. Believe me. Let go of that dream of doing air high fives in the rear-view mirror with your 18 month old.



Your small little love is 75% less likely to die or incur a serious injury if rear-facing when riding the car.



Gasp.



A commentary published earlier this year by the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) recommends that all children under age 2 years be in a rear-facing car seat. Even if their legs hit the back of the seat. The rationale: children are five times safer in rear-facing seats in this age group. Dr Marilyn Bull reviewed studies completed by her team of researchers and the AAP recommendations. She says that in kids we rarely, if ever, see spine injuries in children in rear-facing car seats. She continued, "We will see head injuries or we will see a few other injuries, but the vast majority of serious injuries occur when children are forward facing." To form these opinions, she used data from a study that evaluated US National Highway Traffic Safety Administration vehicle crash database in children under age two from 1988 to 2003.



Here's the good news: Your beloved little babe is five times safer in a car crash while riding rear-facing when between 12-24 months than if you flipped them forward facing. Say that with me, "five times safer."



5 times safer. 75% less likely to die or have a serious injury.





Turn your baby around. This is one of those rare, no brainers. There aren't many of those out there any more.



Funny thing is if you look on the AAP website today or other car seat safety web sites, it may be hard to find this information. Although hard to find, it doesn't make it any less true. Policies and car seat manufacturers are catching up. Dr. Beth Ebel, a pediatrician and safety expert says that the AAP is looking into this and hopes to have new, revised recommendations in the coming months that incorporate these new findings.



The beauty of science and research is that it changes current recommendations. Making things confusing, of course, but ultimately better. And hopefully safer for all of us. Frankly, we'd all be safer if we were riding backwards in the car in an impact at high speed. Not entirely practical to redesign the auto at this juncture but we can improve the way we protect kids.



Some science and rationale:



* When you stop quickly or are involved in an impact, your body continues to fly forward at the velocity the car was going. This sounds likes a 8th grade math word problem; it isn’t. Infants and toddlers have disproportionately big heads for their necks and bodies (read: bobbleheads) so as the car slows, their heads and and upper neck continue to move forward rapidly while the straps of the car seat hold their body in place. This motion puts them at risk for cervical spine and severe neck injuries.

* When rear facing, the head, neck and entire body can absorb the impact at once. This rear-facing position can prevent neck injuries leading to paralysis or even death.



So, we were wrong saying it was okay to turn your baby around when your baby was 20 pounds and a year old.



2 (years) really is the new 1 (year). See?



Spread the word. You may just save someone's life. Now that's a nice little something to check off your to-do list today.



Do This Now:



* Get a car seat safety check if you have any concerns about how you installed the car seat or booster your child rides in. Many injuries in children are related to not using the car seat correctly.

* Make sure you and any one who drives with your children uses the 5 point restraint correctly! In Seattle, you can come here for help.

* Inform yourself about how to use your car seat. Watch this video

* Keep your 12-24 month old rear-facing until at least their 2nd birthday if not over the weight based restrictions of the seat. Most seats accommodate up to 35 pounds rear-facing.

* Talk to your pediatrician if you have questions or leave a comment below.

Ashlye - posted on 04/04/2010

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In some states they may have laws about rear facing car seats. I live in Texas, and per our car seat laws, there is NO law saying any child at any age has to ride rear facing. It is recommended that childrens under the age of 1 yr, ride rear facing due to their necks and backs, in case of car accident (rear ended). They also recommend you keeping your child rear facing for those same reasons as long as you can even after 1 yr of age. Although most are not able to, due to their size and length of their legs. But most children at the age of one, necks and backs are strong enough to be able to change to forward facing. But I suggest you do wait until they are 20lbs+ and 1 yr of age. Just to make sure!! Hope this helps!

Cindy - posted on 04/04/2010

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On the topic of tall/large kids... my 3 year old is about the same size as a 4 year old height wise (I am guessing, he is in the 95%) and is 33 pounds. He is currently rear facing and loves it. He sits with his legs crossed and can play and sleep comfortably. Even when I have him forward facing, he sits with his legs crossed. I would much prefer his spine and neck be protected in an accident... legs heal much better, although I have never heard of broken legs in an accident in the case of a child rear facing.

Cindy - posted on 04/04/2010

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The minimum is 1 year and 20 pounds... we should give our kids more than the minimum... the AAP current recommends 2 years and 30 pounds.

Flora - posted on 04/04/2010

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My child is almost as tall as some two year olds. He outgrew the infant seat before 8 months. If I put him rear facing in his new convertible car seat, his legs are climbing up the back seat. This was at 10 months. How is that safe!? I had to put him forward facing to actually keep him secure. If there was an accident it seemed both his legs would be broke at even a slower impact. I also consulted my pediatrician. Definately do that.

Trish - posted on 04/04/2010

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OK, I've must checked the update for NSW Australia, it is still 6mths old before you can turn them around. They must stay in the forward facing restraint until they're 4yo. Maybe the seats Aust use are different to the US?

Trish - posted on 04/04/2010

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Wow I'm glad I don't live in US or Canada, I'd have one very unhappy baby girl. Carrie I'm not sure where you're from, but In Aust at about 6mths you can turn the seat around, I've know mums to do it sooner.

Tulay - posted on 04/03/2010

3

15

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we started when my girl is 9 months and 9 kilos, thats what her doctor suggests...

Krista - posted on 04/03/2010

1

31

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I was waiting for someone to bring up the "tall kid" issue. Both my boys were turned forward before a year and 20 lbs because they are very tall, but so skinny...If I left them rear facing till 30 or 35 lbs, their poor legs would be so crumpled up, because they grow taller way faster than they gain weight. My 5 year old is 36 lbs and he is 43 inches tall, my 2 and a half year old is 32 lbs and 40 inches. So I don't think having smushed up legs is very safe, either!

Heather - posted on 03/28/2010

30

14

1

one year 20lbs and 30in for most car seats, check out Combi.com for good car seats, they fit in more compact cars without losing space beside them.

Rach - posted on 03/28/2010

15

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i guess it depends on the country coz in australia it's when the baby hits about 9 kilo's which means about 6 months.

Shawna - posted on 03/27/2010

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The general rule has been 20 lbs AND 1 year, but the pediatric websites just changed it to 25 pounds. My daughters car seat says 30 and we are keeping her rear facing until then. She might be happier facing forward, and it has nothing to do with the child walking or not. It has to do with all baby's development in their spine. At 20 pounds it may be okay, but I personally don't want to be a mom that regretted not waiting. Do what your gut tells you, It's your baby.

Eb - posted on 03/27/2010

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I turned the carseat around when he hit 10kg at the age of 10 months, as long as they are strong in their neck and back you can base your decision on weight. I have also ruined my back from lifting the heavy weight over those straps!!. He is facing forward although my carseat still has the option of tilting it back a bit, so he is not sitting straight up. He loves it can see out the window, when he was facing backwards he was always trying to twist and sit up.

Vanessa - posted on 03/27/2010

20

3

0

one year and 20 lbs minimum.. however the association of pediatrics say 30 lbs. I will be turning my boy around when he hits 25lbs...

Katherine - posted on 03/27/2010

3

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It's 20lbs AND 12 months. The age is important b/c the skeletal system isn't strong enough until then to withstand what would happen in a crash-due to their heads being proportionally bigger. So, even if they're 25 lbs at 10 months, you should wait.

Dianne - posted on 03/27/2010

12

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If you in Canada best thing to do is check with insurance companys, but most front facing car seats say anything after 20lbs.

Trish - posted on 03/27/2010

3

17

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In response to Caitlin. I am also from Australia and never realised the U.S. had such strong rules about rear-facing car seats. I agree, here it has been 6 months for rear facing although they have just changed the rules to ensure that children up to the age of 7 are in booster seats so may have changed rear-facing rules too for us here. Had better check.

Leah - posted on 03/25/2010

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Yes, everyone is right about what the law says 1yr and 20lbs. Some babies are an exception sometimes to the law since every child grows differently. If you have a child that is large for their age or smaller consult your doctor on when your child is safe enough to face forward.

Dana - posted on 03/24/2010

22

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One year old and 20 pounds...we are 4 weeks out at my house and I can hardly wait!!!

Chasa - posted on 03/24/2010

30

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22 Pounds or 1 year old, is usually the law.before then they dont have the muscle in there neck to be forward facing , in case an accident the impact can really hurt them! but when there backwards they get the impact the other way so they wont get hurt as easily!! there is also a length that they should be out of the bucket seat your manual should tell you all that for the carseat....my daughter is really close to 20 lbs and only 8 months and she is in a bigger seat but Rear facing,,,,,,im NOT putting her forward till she is 12 months old!! better to be on the safe side!

Kristina - posted on 03/24/2010

5

10

1

My Britax seats can be rear-facing to 30lbs. I had my carseats inspected by the police department (certified in child seat installation) and they recommended keeping my sn rear-facing as long as possible because it is safer for him.

Laurette - posted on 03/24/2010

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So long as baby can hold his own head it should be okay.... that is about 3-4 months or 9kg.

Dana - posted on 03/24/2010

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Its ONE YEAR and 20 POUNDS !!! It's not one or the other.

If it were, then my son would have been front facing at 2 months old.

It makes no difference if they are walking or not. It has to do with size of the bodies compared to the head, and how strong the neck and back muscles are.

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