8 Year old with ADHD and Asperger

Shasta - posted on 01/25/2011 ( 31 moms have responded )

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My 8 year old son was diagnosed as ADHD when he was 6. Just a short while ago, he was finally diagnosed with Asperger's which I had known all along by researching it, but finally received the official diagnosis.



My son is ALWAYS in trouble in school. He gets next to no class time at all and is taught mainly one on one by a resource teacher, intervention worker or teachers aid. I have had to leave work so many times to pick him up because the school says he is out of control. He takes off and hides in school, he speaks out and disrupts the entire class, he crawls under the desks during class time, rolls himself up in the mat in the classroom and just flat out refuses to work sometimes. He is in grade 3 and can only read at a grade 1 level. I have him on medication for ADHD and have tried many variations and dosages. This one we are on works the best now, but it isn't fool proof. I know they are using the resources they have, but can't help but feel like they somehow blame me for his actions at school because of the upset phone calls I receive. I have explained to them about his diagnosis and keep being told "We have had autistic children here before and they never acted like this." I am at a loss. I deal with his melt downs and defiance etc at home too. I know it is happening and I know why. But I still feel like the staff at the school somehow blame me. I see so much potential in him. Aside from his reading deficiency, he is very smart and advanced in math and sciences. Is there something I should be doing with him to help him with his behavior at school? Is there anyone else going through this too? I feel so helpless.



To add on what I have been going through with his school, on the 2nd I got extremely upset at them for how they treated him. When he got home, he was upset because he had gotten on trouble in school. I asked him what had happened. He said they got mad because he refused to go to the classroom and do his work. I asked him why not and he said he didn't want to because he was so upset. I asked him what had made him so upset. He said that his teacher told him to hurry up with his lunch so he could get ready and go outside to play. (You have to understand that we are in Canada and have a TON of snow and it is cold....my son is like his dad in the sense that in the summer, you have to force him into the house and in the winter, you have to pry his clutching fingers off the door frame just to get him to go out.) The school was upset by his obvious "defiance" to not hurry and go outside because it took away from the teacher's lunch break. He was then told he would need to "make up" the outdoor time. When the bell rang and all the children came in, my son was made to stay outside an additional 10 minutes with the T.A. to teach him a lesson. I was outraged. All the children were brought inside and here is my poor son being made to stand outside the school doors and being told that he may not enter as he stands there and cries. I told the school that it was their own fault that he didn't want to go to class afterwards and that I had better not EVER hear of them doing something like that again. I don't think I was really that nice when I said it. I was pretty upset. They just seemed indignant like I was over reacting. OMG. People who claim to be professionals make me so angry when they show absolutely no common sense. This is a child with ASD. You can't try and "teach him a lesson" with negative re-enforcement. He will just become even more defiant and stubborn. The behavior will be far worse than what he was being punished for in the first place. Kids with ASD need positive re-enforcement. Their brains don't work the same as ours do. Why can't these self proclaimed "highly trained professionals" understand that small fact?

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Lela - posted on 02/01/2011

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That functional behavior assessment is actually PART OF the IEP, Maureen. It's not used in place of an IEP, it's used as supporting data. Once it is completed, they will develop a Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP) that is supposed to employ positive behavior strategies to make things better for the child. It's frustrating, however, to run into those that either do them badly or do not enforce IEP & BIP strategies correctly. This happens so often. My son had all this done, but when he was about 8. He's now 12 & the behaviors he had then are not the ones he has now (sometimes) and if they are, they are not for the same reasons. But, yes, everyone should push for this if their child has behavior issues at school that need to be dealt with!

Beverley - posted on 02/07/2011

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i have a son aged 8 with asd and he feels so alone we are in england uk and would like to know if a penfriend scheme could be started for these kids to connect with each other they are all experiencing similar things and it may help them to feel they are not alone

Wendy - posted on 02/05/2011

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It sounds like the teachers do not know how to deal with your child. My daughter is in 3rd grade as well and has pdd. I ask her about her day, everyday when she gets home from school. I have created a safe place for her to tell me what is happening in school. You would be suprised at the way that schools treat autism spectrum children. Your problems with your children may very well stem from the school. With children on the spectrum having comunication problems, it is very easy for them to become frustrated and react. Plus they are uninhibited to react. They need to be treated with patience and understanding.

I would start asking him about his day. Try to connect in any way that you can. It is great for his communication skills too. My daughter can tell me much more about what is going on at school now, then she could in the beginning of the school year and she knows that I love her and I am there for her, which is very comforting to her.

You know what is best for your child, not the school. They mostly care that your child doesn't make waves for them. Don't let them make you feel bad about anything.

Melisa - posted on 02/01/2011

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well my little guy is 12 now...but when he started school he would have melt downs and I would have to go and get him. I worked closeley with the school and also a phycologist on how to work with my son. I told them he had to sit at back or side of room..didn't like people surrounding him..also got to school early so he can setlle in he doesn't like being in hallway when every one was in the hallway..to much noise and to crowded...he has a safe room to do his work in...just know it is not YOU it is his disorder and as my little guy says "it" takes over and it is hard to control..he paces outside in yard and has hand held games..it distracts and calms him....if you can get another person to come in and talk with the school to explain that this is "normal" behavior for him at this time and need time , patience, and help to get through this stage. I hope this helps sorry for rambling have so much to share...feel free to contact me if you need to talk, vent, or exchange ideas.

Maureen - posted on 02/01/2011

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It is incumbent upon the school to take action if you son's disability impacts his rights to a free appropriate public education. If his behavior is so disruptive that he is spending more time not learning than learning, it's time for the school to act. Many schools look to the parent, as that way they don't have to deal with the behavior. If the plan in place is not working, they need to come up with a better plan. I am going through this with my daughter. The school put a plan in place that actually has made her behavior worse. There's no time for blame to be placed. Bottom line is if he is not getting the same education his peers are, there is a problem. I'm not sure if Functional Behavioral Evaluations are available in Canada. Check out www.wrightslaw.com to read about these evaluations and see if they, or something similar, are offered. My daughter had one done recently, and you can guarantee action will be taken now. They basically observe your child at school (across settings) and at home. Figure out what is triggering negative behaviors/behaviors that impact his success, and formulate a plan to address them. It's different from an IEP, it's much better. Just a thought. Good Luck!

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Crystal - posted on 09/30/2013

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I just wanted to say this sounds exactly like my son but where I am from they want to do away with aspergers diagnoses and I am really nervous what if the school gets tired of fooling with him and he would be considered normal child so he would be punished according what a normal child is

Aleisha - posted on 03/13/2013

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I am reading this and it sounds just like my son. I have taken away all his favorite things he loves playing with when he comes home from school. My son is 8 years old and is having a hard time in school, all he does it act out, cry all day long, I mean and it comes home like that. He does it from the time he gets up until the time he comes home. Now when he goes to his grandma/dad house he doesn't really do it but they send him to his room or make him sit in time out all day long. I am at lost of what to do anymore, I mean, it's consist all the time. He is about to fail the second grade because he just throws fits at school all the time. He doesn't want to do his work, I am stuck with anymore routines to do. HELP

Nita - posted on 03/09/2011

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wow, guys...not to sound redundant, but there you are talking about my daughter again! i feel like i could post on every one of these topics! we have the same behavioral issues at school and everything! i can totally agree with everything you have posted, shasta! you try time outs, they don't work. sticker charts, they don't work. rewarding charts, they don't work. taking favorite anythings away, doesn't work. for my daughter it is like, out of sight, out of mind. our very recent diagnosis is being challenged by the school because they refuse to foot the bill for one more student. really, it is not my daughter's fault that there are a lot of students in this particular school that are considered "high needs". she's in an inclusion school, which i agree with because she does need to learn to socialize. her main problems are social and behavioral. spitting, throwing chairs, oh my...at the end of my rope most days. i am so glad i have found this community!! thank you all for your daily struggles~they are helping so many of us who just want to break down and cry!
what also has worked, is her teacher rubs the small of her back/shoulders when she starts getting into that "mode" and it seems to work, so i am thinking of trying one of those weighted vests and see if it helps her. she also lets her listen to instrumental music on an ipod while testing so she doesn't distract other students. we haven't had our first meeting with the school yet, it's april 6th, but already i am dreading it...

for beverly and tracy, i think that would be a WONDERFUL idea! my daughter is almost 8 and i know she would be thrilled to have a pen pal, especially one that is similar to her! as she also has issues with making/keeping friends. is there a way we could message each other and try it? good luck to you all!

Erin - posted on 02/08/2011

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I'm a Mom of four, my youngest with PPD-NOS, who is five this month. Just like any child, an ASD child needs strict discipline and consistent consequences. I believe it starts at home defining what is acceptable and what is not. It's more difficult as they get older, and it can be quite tiring since you feel you are constantly on their butts, but once it clicks with them, you will see an immediate difference. Reward him for no calls or notes home, but take away his favorite anything if he does when he gets home until the next day. The school districts will not change your kids behavior, you have to. This message is sent with love and experience.

Tracy - posted on 02/07/2011

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I think that is a great idea Beverly, I know that my 7 year old daughter has asked many times why she does not have friends like her sister does. I have struggled to try and find others her own age with a Aspergers diagnosis like she has who have similar problems and difficulties.

Mary Beth - posted on 02/07/2011

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My son also has ADHD and is on the spectrum. We have found that some form of physical activity each day helps him deal with school. He is now 7 and is doing pretty good. He runs for about 4 to 5 hours per day between before and after school. Hope that helps.

Lela - posted on 02/04/2011

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Shasta, go to www.autism-society.org. You can look up if there is an autism support group near you. I'm the vice president of ours here. I run a support group every month. Sometimes very few people show up, but sometimes lots show up. Just whoever needs support at the time - we talk about everything from school issues to home issues. There is a way on that website to look up chapters by the region you're in.

Laurie - posted on 02/04/2011

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i've had issues like this with my son also because he has ODD too. I actually spoke to the social worker & the principal first because I knew the teachers would think they were justified in what they did. They left bruises on my son from holding him. THat just makes things worse!Reallly the bruises didnt go away for a WEEK! My husband & I were not having that! It was discussed among them & theyre going to try other techniques and this week things have turned a corner so well c how it goes. THey are trying things that helped a little inthe past, weighted vest, weighted lap pad, and also doing pressure massage when he gets out of control. its not really a massage its pressing on him to calm him down between 2 foam mats. that has seemed to help alot. he likes firm but not 2 tight pressure. Maybe you could discuss this w/ your worker?

Shasta - posted on 02/02/2011

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I am so happy with the feed back I have gotten from other parents in the same boat as me. I just wish there was some group or something in my area where I could meet them and take my child so that he can interact with other children that are like him so he can understand that he isn't "weird" like he feels he is. I want him to see that other kids are just like him. I want him to know that they aren't "weird"..just different in a way...but no less important or smart as the next person. I try to explain this to my son by telling him that the only difference is that his brain works a little differently than ours but that he is just as smart as anyone else. This seems to make him feel better, but he still feels like an outsider. Does anyone know of groups of parents and kids with ASD meet in Southern New Brunswick, Canada?

Shasta - posted on 02/02/2011

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I have been searching around and there does not seem to be any services around that I can work with. I found "Autism New Brunswick" and when I sent an email off to them, it bounced back to me and said it was not a valid email. The school boards also have very little funding and resources here in my area to deal with ASD children. It is like we are in the dark ages here in the Maritimes!

Shasta - posted on 02/02/2011

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Time out will help with my son too, but only when he has an outburst. It doesn't take long. He will have his fit and go on time out. As he is going, he is screaming swear words at us and telling us he hates us etc. After about 5 minutes he is completely calmed down again. But as for defiant behavious and speaking out etc, there seems to be no stopping that. I think he needs to have someone he can talk to to help him open up and say what he is feeling that has made him want to act that way.

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We've had the same problems with my son, who is now 12. He is on medication to control his anger and it helps, but there are still times when he freezes, throws things, or hits people. Unfortunately, he doesn't live with me, so I can't be much help. We have discovered that if we give him "time out" in a corner or the middle of the floor doing nothing for 30 minutes as a result of his misbehavior, he behaves better afterwards.

Laurie - posted on 02/01/2011

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OMG! The problem you've posted is EXACTLY what were going through right now. We live a rural area w/o alot of choices education wise.and my 9 yo son is in 3rd grade also. He's also exceling at math & science but not reading. I feel that the teacher wants to blame me too or for me to FIX him! My son has a hard time controlling his body movements & is large for his age so hes bigger than the other kids & we have problems w/ that at school. The school counselor has helped alot because she does a group therapy session w/ my son & a one on one session so thats helped too. Just keep informing the school about what they can & cannot expect you to do with your son. Give them any ideas that work for you at home. For (ex) at our last IEP meeting I brought up to them that they needed to really think about when the problems were happening & how to head them off at the pass so to speak by anticipating "hmmm will this set the student off? can we try somthing different schedule wise? Is there enough supervision? Can you as an educator research some more & go to training?" They seemed receptive to my suggestions because #1 theyve got to do it by law. #2 I think generally most teachers care they just need a fresh pair of eyes or opinions for certain kids. His teacher let me know she is going to a training next month that is strictly for spectrum disorders so i was impressed by that! Some of us need to make that hard decision about our kids that maybe the regular school environment isnt good for Aspies? I guess you have to weight the pros and cons of homeschooling versus regular schooling & whether you can find other ways for your child to get the social aspect if homeschool works better.Someday maybe things will change with the public schoool system but dont know if I'll see it in my sons lifetime.

Donna - posted on 02/01/2011

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Wow, it seems things are pretty much the same everywhere. I hate to say it, but it's almost easier for my youngest son who is severely autistic, because he gets all of the interventive services and everyone knows what they can and can't expect of him. My 15 year old however has been a nightmare in the public school system, She is bipolar, has ADHD and is hearing impaired on top of the Aspergers. Because she is so smart, everyone wants to treat her like a typical child and then when she fails they demonize her. I have home schooled for most of her life, because it is just too much to constantly fight the school to get them to comply with her IEP. The home school community is full of aspie kids and at least then she is not thrown in with all of the kids who are truly badly behaved kids who have worse problems than she has. I might also mention that putting both of our kids with austism on different ends of the spectrum have greatly benefited from a gluten free/casiene free diet. For those of you with younger children I would highly recommend rethinkautism.com, they have a fabulous program that can be used by everyone who interacts with your child, I can't say enough good things about the program, and our youngest's teachers love the program as well.

Tracy - posted on 02/01/2011

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One other thing I forgot. In my area Kinark child Services has the contract with the school board to advise them on Autism issues. So when kid is diagnosed someone from Kinark meets periodically with the teacher of that child and gives them ideas about avoiding recurring problems and ways to help the child with any difficulties they are having. It is an anonymous process and the Kinark rep never meets with the child them selves. I also get help from Resources for Exceptional Children and my worker will come to school meeting with me and help with advise on how to deal with the school.

Tracy - posted on 02/01/2011

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I am appalled at the treatment you and your son get from the school. I am in Ontario and have a 7 year old daughter with Aspergers. She has an IEP and her gym teacher would never force her to participate if she was uncomfortable doing it. Forcing a child to engage in something that makes them uncomfortable will only cause the rest of the day to get progressively worse. My pediatrician advised me to talk to the school about having a quiet room for Megan. This quiet room would be comfortable and safe place for her to go when feeling overwhelmed. We are working on getting good sensory items for the room (similar to some of those in a snoezelen room). I am very lucky that there are few meltdowns for my girl, she does have some difficulties in Gym class and keeping her hands to herself (when the class is on the mat) so the teacher allows her to sit in a chair near the rest of the class but not right on the mat with them. Most of our problems occur at recess and lunch hour when there is insufficient supervision. Don't let your son get down on himself about his reading, everyone has areas that they excel in and some that they don't no body has to be good at everything. He only needs to get by. I would try getting him a mentor or buddy at school or even a neighbor who can come to your home if it is easier. Pick someone who is older by at least a few years and that could just sit and read with him (anything of his choice) and they can take turns with the reading so he does not get overwhelmed. I know someone who has a daughter with a learning disability and she paid (without her child knowing) the daughter of a friend to help her with math. The leaning disabled child believed she was helping the other girl who needed to get community service hours for high school credit for being a tutor for younger kids. I think many kids are more wiling to get help from another kid instead of an adult who may get frustrated with them. I have so many other things I want to say but could write pages so I will stop there.

Beatrice - posted on 02/01/2011

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My grandson had that problem and they changed school districts and got better teachers and staff. this year he has missed only 1 day and is doing much better in school.

Sarah - posted on 02/01/2011

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my son ( now 15) had issues at school for 4 years. AT 11 years old he was dx as aspergers. He was removed from the mainstream school and put in a special school for children with emotional and/or legal issues. His class has only had like 12 kids maximum for the last few years, and he was still physically or verbally abusive at least once a week. Nothing worked, and we were on pins and needles all the time. We felt like we could not even punish him for things he did wrong without risking physical harm. 9 months ago we convinced the psychiatrist to medicate him for the depression and anxiety that his testing had identified. Within a month or so he was a new child. He is currently 15 years old, 105 pounds and is on 1mg tenex, 7.5mg abilify and 20mg prozac every morning. After his evening meal he takes 1mg tenex and 5mg abilify.

Leslee - posted on 01/28/2011

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WOW!!! That sound almost like my situation. My son is also 8 yrs old but in the second grade and he reads at a 1st grade level, he also has a TSS worker, she does help a little but not entirely, I dont get many calls but his TSS worker and I do write in a notebook every day so she can let me know how he does in school everyday. I also just like you, deal with defiance at home. And I also finally found a medicine that works better than others. Main difference between you and I is that his school doesnt blame me at all, they are very understanding. What I did to help my son out a little with his attitude and defiance is taking him to therapy. We started out with once every week, then went to every other week, now down to once a month, sadly though I think we will have to go back to every other week, starting to act up a little. But needless to say, therapy has helped a lot!!

Shasta - posted on 01/28/2011

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I know how you feel. I waiting for them to tell me to send him to a different school. The school he is in is generally a very good one and I never had any issues before this. My older child went there as well and we were always happy with the level of education. There is supposed to be an accommodation for his homework as well, but the teacher just photo copies the list of homework items and puts it into each child's agenda. I have told her many times that I am just going to pick and choose from the list because there is no way he will complete it all. Especially when she has the children in her class reading "chapter" books and my son is still reading picture books with great difficulty. It still seems to irk her though. I am trying currently to fight to have him held back a year so he can have a chance to catch up a bit on reading etc because he is getting worse and worse each year behaviorally and I believe that much of it is credited to the fact that his self esteem is so low over his basic inability to read anything other than a kindergarten picture book, so he hides it in behavior to distract away from that fact. I know it bothers him terribly. It isn't my son's fault and if I hadn't done what needed to be done, he would be simply labelled as the "bad" kid and then pushed through grades year after year until he graduated without the ability to read or write. They say they don't like to hold children back because it is bad for their "self esteem" and can be more detrimental down the line. I think it is foolishness. If a child is not able to sufficiently do the work that is appropriate for them, then they should hold him/her back to give them a fighting chance to catch up to his/her peers and not feel so overwhelmed by school all the time. I told them that by pushing him through like they are doing, it is like sending him to swimming lessons and in the first level they are taught how to float. The second level they are told to jump in the deep end. Well, if the child can't float, they wouldn't be told they passed and then go to the next level and be told to jump in the deep end. I think they are trying to push the kids through because it hurts their statistics if they have "fails" and then hurts their government funding. I think it is hard enough to help our children be well adjusted and receive the quality education they need and deserve, but when the school keeps calling because the child is being "disrespectful" etc, it gets really frustrating. They are supposed to be the professionals. Sometimes I feel like telling them "You are the teacher and he is in your school...Please do your job and stop calling me. You know what his issues are and you know that he is not going to behave like his peers...what do you expect me to do about it?" But of course I don't say that, even though I would if I thought it would help matters any. i have thought of the home schooling too, but decided against it because of 2 factors...He needs the social interaction with his peers and then other the other side of things, our household couldn't afford groceries without the 2nd income I bring in. It is so hard being stuck in this turmoil every day. Each day, my husband will call me at work to find out how many calls I got from the school today or to find out if the school has told me to come and pick him up because they can't control him. Makes me want to cry.

Lela - posted on 01/28/2011

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Yes, I know. We have all the accommodations as well and even have an aide that is specifically there for my son (this person stays with him all day to help curb any behaviors, etc). People were shocked we had this here but, like you said, it's the squeaky wheel that gets the oil, right? I squeak a lot and very loudly at times...lol. But, just because you have the accomodations doesn't mean they always enforce them. I just didn't know if you had it. Someone once told me that the modified assignment thing extends to the home and to homework. You should tell them that you are modifying his assignments at home and that they will have to grade them based on those modifications. Just an idea. It is frustrating. Just yesterday we were called at least 10 times during the day to tell us what a horrible time they were having with my son. Sometimes I get calls just for them to tell me he is being 'disrespectful'. Right now we have him in a magnet school (he had to take a test to get in, you have to have high grades, etc). I have a feeling that he will be asked not to return next year and then I don't know what we'll do because our district school is NOT a good one at all! I may, at that point, bring him home to homeschool him. I would have done that years ago if I hadn't been afraid the lack of social interaction would be detrimental to him. Sometimes you just have to vent all the frustrations!

Shasta - posted on 01/28/2011

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Yes. He has an S.E.P (Special Education Plan). We are in Canada, so I guess that is the name for the equivalent to the IEP in the States. They make accommodations for him in class to adjust his curriculum to be modified to his needs and to be challenging to him. He has also a teacher's aid that works with him, an intervention worker, and a special resources teacher that works with him one on one. We had the meetings etc at the school. The school did their testing, then a child psychologist through the school-board did a 3 day testing with him to "map his brain" so they could make the appropriate adjustments to his environment and the way he is taught. He has gone to a pediatrician, and a child neurologist and we have seen a psychologist who met with him as well. All findings from each expert have also been given to the school so they are in the loop. He is getting full advantage of all the resources that are available to him and many people are shocked at how fast I made this happen, but I caused many waves and they fast-tracked him through just to appease me because I was becoming such a pain in their butts. He has been on the SEP since grade 2. It has helped. But even though they are all aware of the situation and claim to understand, but yet they still seem very shocked and upset by his behavior when he does act out or refuses to do something and then they call or send notes home. Gets very frustrating.

Lela - posted on 01/28/2011

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Do you have an IEP for your son at school? Because through an IEP, you could get him modified assignments, extended time for assignments and tests and A.P.E. (adaptive physical education). If you don't have an IEP, you need to ask for one and if you do have one, you need to have a meeting to add these things to it. Take an advocate with you if you need to.

Shasta - posted on 01/28/2011

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It is sad, but nice to know I am not alone. I feel like such a failure sometimes. Even homework becomes a real task because his self confidence is so low with his reading that when it comes to doing anything that relates to reading or writing he throws one of his screaming fits and throws his books, smacks his forehead with his fist and keeps saying he is stupid. It is so hard to calm him down. I do my best to assure him that he is not stupid at all, he is very smart but just having a little trouble in that area and that with lots of practice, he will be just fine and that I am very proud of him for what he can do now and proud of him when he tries his best. The teacher always sends home notes in his book bag stating that he hasn't completed all his homework and that it is necessary etc. I can only make my son do so much. He reaches a certain point and after that, it would be like beating a dead horse so to speak, He shuts down and refuses to do any more. He certainly can not benefit from having to spend his entire evening in complete frustration taking 4 hours to do homework that would take other children maybe 30 minutes. Then on top of all that, I keep getting nasty notes from his gym teacher who says that he won't participate in certain activities or games and that I need to talk to him and MAKE him do it. How am I supposed to do that? I have talked to him and he hates certain activities (mainly because they involve physical contact with other kids) and he doesn't want to do it. He would rather sit and watch them or do something else. I have tried to explain to his gym teacher why my son acts like that and suggested that perhaps instead of Shawn sitting out, he could find another activity that my son could do on the side to keep him active, but not make him have to do the group activity if it bothers him so much. They pretty much told me that no, he is expected to do what he is told and that is that. They make me feel like I am a terrible mother who has no idea how to raise a "normal" child and that they don't think there is anything wrong with him except that he is just a "bad" and "spoiled" kid. Every night, I go to bed and feel like crying. He is very smart and it seems like he isn't being understood. I just want him to lead a happy and productive life. I don't want him to be made to feel like he is "bad" or "stupid". But seeing some of the messages left, I know with more certainty, it is not me being a bad parent. It is just the lack of understanding by the educational professionals and I am not alone in this. Thank you for sharing with me. I appreciate all the feedback and your personal stories as well. It makes me feel so much better and not so alone.

Lela - posted on 01/27/2011

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My son is 12 and we are in the same boat, Shasta! The school constantly calls because he's being disrespectful or not cooperative. My child is on medication as well but recently going through changes with that to find another one. We're also experiencing puberty and I am hoping this will be over soon!! They're very good at making you feel as though you are a horrible parent and should just wave your magic wand so that your child will behave just like all the other children. I am so close to pulling my son out and homeschooling him it's not funny. If I didn't think it would be so detrimental to his social development, we would have done that a long time ago. We can't find a medication that has worked so far and every time my phone rings I nearly jump out of my skin. So, no, you are not alone. Your child is not the only one who has ever acted the way he does.

Diana - posted on 01/25/2011

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Shasta, my Asperger child who is now10yr old used to do the same, mainly because of the OCD, and if he didn't get his way he'd throw chairs hit teachers, bite students. He still has issues in a special needs class of maybe 5 students, But he's on medication, which was the only thing that seems to control it. Whoever, now my child sleeps the first few hours of school, and even when he's doing his school work, "zones" according to his teacher. So what is a mother to do? I hate the fact that I have to medicate my child so he is controllable in school. And yes they would call me and pretty much complain, like its my fault that he's doing this. At home is no different, I just handle it in a better way, one that we can both be happy, and not provoke the argument. So no its NOT you, and dont let them tell you it is. - Diana

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