Any feedback on Autism diets?

Stacey - posted on 07/28/2009 ( 11 moms have responded )

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My Son is almost 2 1/2, he has speech delay & has been seeing a Speech Pathologist for a couple of months, who has told us she thinks it is possible that he may have Autism. I have heard a lot of good things about Autism diets and recoveries & am interested in trying some or all of the following: Gluten-free & Casein-free diet with Vitamin supplementation, detox of metals & Anti-fungals for yeast overgrowth. I would like to hear some feedback if anyone has tried any of these.

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11 Comments

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Renee - posted on 08/01/2009

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We have been doing this diet for 5 years and have had great results. If you need any help please contact me.
Renee

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I brought my son to an allergist before changing his diet, and I'm so glad I did. We learned he was allergic to milk and eggs, but not to wheat. Six months later, he was retested, and now he's allergic to wheat, but NOT to milk or eggs anymore. I'm grateful we didn't have to cut out everything at once. Both dietary changes have brought some improvement, but watching him go through withdrawal from wheat was painful.

[deleted account]

My son created his own specialized diet simply by refusing anything that did not fall into the gluten-free vegan category. I've noticed the foods he chooses are rich in vitamin E. He decided this as a little one before he could possibly know about such things, and eventually I figured out the pattern. He's 11 now, and almost all of his problematic Aspie symptoms (echolalia, repetitive actions, anxious tics, high-anxiety tantrums) have faded away, leaving a happy eccentric kid.

Erica - posted on 07/31/2009

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I did the GF/Cf diet for 2 years ,now it is much easier to do and not harmful but you can have your son tested to see if he has any intolerances before puting him on the diet. You also need to be careful not to do more than one thing at a time. If you are going to do the diet wait at least 6 weeks to start the supplements. He is still a baby and you do not want to shock his system. I feel that the anti-fungals are more important when your son is on an anti-biotic .

Stacey - posted on 07/30/2009

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Thanks for all replies, I had already ordered 2 of Jenny McCarthy's books, and 3 recipe books for GFCF diets and we are going to give it a try.

Kitty - posted on 07/29/2009

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I took out a lot of the dairy and red dye out of my daughters diet. It helped her open up so much

Becka - posted on 07/29/2009

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My son Noah is 9 and we are for the most part casein free gluten and wheat free and it makes a big difference in how he deals with life.

Sasha - posted on 07/29/2009

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my son was totaly non-verbal at this age. it is a good age to get started on the process of helping him learn about the world. Alec (my son) had severe hyperactivity issues as well. I did try a number of diets with him, and the biggest help I found was cutting out sugar. It was a hard thing to do. Any sugar would set him off and it would take a couple of weeks to get him straight again. Every time he was given sweets or sugary drinks he would go nuts again, even ketchup was a problem. Then they started adding sugar to cornflakes and ricecrispies. I did become a pro at checking, and knowing the other names for sugar that the industry use to hide how much sugar they put in things. When my parents went out to the states a while ago they said it was even worse there. My son is now 16, on the gifted and talented register, has an agent for acting jobs and starts college in september. Hard to believe from the little boy who hand-flicked, couldn't talk, and would have at least 4 huge meltdownds a day with frequent periods of banging his head against the wall in between. It has been a very long and tough road, and has been so much hard work. There have been tears - from both of us. We are not there yet. But we have come further than I ever dreamed possible. I was told to drug him and that i should expect him to be in a home and heavily sedated by now. He is going to college and is looking for a weekend job. He's had loads of girlfriends (still having a bit of trouble getting him to understand that he can only one at a time, but i keep trying.



Back to the diets: The best thing for me to advise is to try. Each child is so different. Give each one a reasonable trial, then move on. Keep your eyes on the finish line (an independant adult who doesn't freak out when something changes) and try to steer towards it. Your child has no limits. Enjoy the journey.

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