Any moms with ASD "Recovery" stories?

Jenny - posted on 07/19/2011 ( 2 moms have responded )

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Hello,

My 2 y and 8 m old daughter is facing a possible ASD diagnosis because of poor eye contact, poor socialization and repetitive play. Are there any moms out there with ASD "recovery" stories? What are the things that "worked" for them? Does socialization become easier as they get older?

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Jenny - posted on 07/21/2011

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Thank you Becky for taking the time to reply. You obviously are working really hard for your son. Im glad to hear from someone who has been there. Right now, its all so overwhelming that Im trying to understand and seek out what the futures going to be like- Will she be able to live on her own some day, will she be fulfilled, will she be a good human being who one day has a family and children of her own. Or will she be trapped forever in her own world. I know its going to take a lot of work, but if we could hope for some of these things then it would all be so worth it.

Becky - posted on 07/21/2011

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Well my son is only almost 4 now and was diagnosed a year or so ago. I can't attest to the "recovery" part but I can tell you that with intensive - very intensive - one on one therapy from multiple therapists such as Occupational, Speech, Behaviorial, Developmental, and Nutritionists actually helped my son and we saw major improvement to the point where his special issues were minimized greatly. We are currently fighting an up hill battle. When the state paid therapy stopped so did my son's progress. They taught us how to work and do the therapies on our own, but it isn't the same. He just doesn't focus at all. He is regressing terribly and we are struggling to get back some of the progress he made. For socialization - We keep pushing socialization with small groups or one or one with him, some days are good and some days are bad. I will tell you something that I learned after much research, the activities your child participates in early in the day can sometimes have a direct impact in the behavior later in the day. If my son was tickled earlier in the day or went to the store and was a little overwhelmed, he would have a horrible evening. After many trials we learned to take our time with him, and keep him to the most strict schedule possible. This does help some, but I am not going to lie, you have a rough road ahead. Hang in there it will get better and the rewards for your child accomplishing things most parents take for granted, you will feel emotionally overwhelmed by any progress made! There are a lot of people who will support you, and several who won't. Just always be an advocate for your daughter and remember you know her and her needs best! That being said, with intensive therapy I have seen several children make miraculous progress, every child is different. Be patient with her and remind yourself she will astound you everyday. She will have things down path one day and then another she will take a step backwards, this is just her way of making her brain figure things out. She is smarter than you'll ever imagine! Early intervention is the best way to go. Start TODAY. There are things you can do without having to wait weeks to see a therapist! Research as many things as you can trust me the littlest thing can make the biggest difference. I was so proud of my son after we had worked and worked on how to say his name and just a couple weeks ago he finally made the connection and said it. Hang in there I promise you will have more treasured memories and you will appreciate the small things more. Oh one more thing. The repetitive play is a big one that we still struggle with everyday! My son lays his head down on the floor or table when he goes in the zone. Watch her closely and interrupt when you see it start. Make her play differently, temper tantrums and screamin aside and trust me I sit through 2 hour ones regularly, make her try it differently. If she won't then take it away and try try again! Be persisitent. Have toys that are jsut for therapy or "special play". We have turned our living room copmpletely around just for my son's therapy. Sometimes it helps to get some really active play out before you start or some shaving cream play. It helps get their brain ready to participate. Also try bouncing her on an excercise ball, a little rough and tumbly goes a long way! OK just some suggestions. Good luck and welcome to the roller coaster, it's a bit scary but a beautiful ride!

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