Anyone a mother of teenage autistic (Asperger) children?

Joan - posted on 07/03/2009 ( 97 moms have responded )

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I am a mother of 2 teenage children with Asperger syndrome as well as other issues. Anyone else dealing with kids with these challenges and school/social issues?

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Er - posted on 07/18/2009

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I've read a lot of posts here and it seems clear to me that there are different extremes for kids with Asperger's. My son is now16. I am very blessed at how he has grown. When he was three, we noticed some very distinct differences which we later realized were tell-tale signs of the syndrom. He is actually my step-son, but since I've been in his life since he was three, I've seen quite the spectrum. I can tell you that he has drastically improved with age. It seems I might have an isolated case, but getting help and reassurance has helped us tremendously. Trying to distinguish which behaviors are teenage and which are ADD and which are A.S has been difficult, but helpful. My son is planning on attending a culinary institute when he graduates next year (2011-212). It is almost set up to cater to kids with this syndrom and he loves cooking. Most people don't even know he has A.S. unless they spend uninterrupted time with him. The public schools do try, but they just don't seem to have the budget to address each special needs kid how they need to be addressed. I've heard comments from teachers telling me that it is his own fault for not asking for help (which many of us know is very difficult for A.S. kids) to he's lazy (which again is another misconception). Have faith. My son ended up on honor roll recently, but it took a lot of parental involvement. The best advice I can give is 1)Pray 2) Don't give up 3) Stay as involved as you possibly can 4) make sure each teacher knows you and knows that you are very active 5) each teacher needs to know that they will be held accountable if they do not work with you/your child and 6) planners are invaluable! My son is just getting to the point where he understands he cannot trust his memory for everything as much as he'd like to. Try having the teacher look over and initial the planner daily for every class so that you can follow up at home. Regarding the social aspect, though it was difficult, I do credit the public school environment for helping my son adjust to how the world will respond to him. He has learned several coping skills and has learned to adjust to the general public. If I see him doing something that is not socially acceptable, I talk to him about it and let him know how society responds. We sometimes have to have that conversation repeatedly, but he is mature enough to understand the consequences. At least he can learn general socializing skills even if he wasn't born with them or even if they don't come naturally. Hope that helps!

Rhonda - posted on 11/06/2011

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Hi Kim..my son is 12...He is starting to come out a little about talking with other kids...I try to keep him updated on what is new and going on in the world,..his peers call him stupid but he is a straight student..I got tired of him coming home and feeling down..So i called the school and gave them a piece of mind, because the teachers are not stopped these other students from bulling him..The teachers are now aware and doing something about it..because they all know he is a good and loving kid

Faith - posted on 07/19/2011

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Bec - everyone's different, especially in processing of meds. You didn't indicate whether your child is a boy or a girl. My son is now 16. He was diagnosed at 14, but has had meds longer. I think the frequent changes in dosage is more finding what is right. Once you find that sweet spot it should be good for awhile. Not an expert. My son didn't even start puberty until after 14th birthday, so that probably helped us in the stability department. We are going through dosage changes right now though. :( I am unsure of how many of his changes are due to Aspergers versus undiagnosed bipolar either. Keep doing what you are doing. I'm sorry that I couldn't be more help. Focus on the child's strengths during good times to "ride the waves". Some of the waves pull us under, some don't.

Lisa - posted on 07/20/2009

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Joan,
I'm not the mom, but I am the baby sister of a 49 yr old big brother that diagnosed with Autism many yrs ago. I am trying to get our mother to help my brother get re-evaluated, from the research I've done, I believe that my big bro is more Ausberger's...

I remember my brother being in school - he was also mainstreamed - he now has a degree in mortuary science, a degree in foresic science, he's a certified medical assistant, and a certified pharmacy tech, but he just can't get a job. Because he's "different".
I think kids are better at dealing with those that seem different from themselves, that is until their parents get involved. It hoovers, 'cuz so many adults are so rude, esp to those that are not what they consider "normal"....but, what is "normal"??
Thanks for listening:)

Tina - posted on 07/20/2009

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The hormone thing freaks me out!! I have a 12 yr old daughter and I wonder if girls are more difficult than boys in the teen yrs. My daughter has alot of trouble regulating and controlling emotions. She also lacks friendships but is blessed to have 2 younger sisters. Her high intelligence does seem to make people doubt that there is a legitimate disorder and it appears to most outsiders that she simply has behavior problems. Sometimes I even have trouble knowing where to draw the line on discipline/consequences for behavior. It is a delicate balance between discipline, therapy and medication. I just hope to get it mostly right.

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Kim - posted on 07/25/2011

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Carrie, I totally understand. My 11 year old only talks about Breyer Horses and Avatar: The Last Airbender. Her peers are so over it and it bring her unwanted attention. It's not really her peers fault because Lauren bring a lot of it onto herself, which is so hard to explain to her! Sighs...

Kathy - posted on 07/20/2011

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several things can effect medications you have metabalizm and you have puberty and individual reactions. IF your child is on lythium.. it is imperative that you have levels drawn as with medications levels can drop thus needing an increase.
Sometimes children are on too much and some need to be dropped.. If your child is in the "wonderful world of puberty, changing meds every 6 weeks maybe necessary as hormones change so do medicinal effects.. I am lucky if my son can stay stabolized for three months.. The important thing is "is he safe or is he in danger of hurting himself or others... You can never cross that line.....
my son has been hospitalized 4 times in under a year just to stabolize his meds... secondly sometimes they need more behavioral support like a day treatment program as opposed to a traditional school... it can be quite complicated. All I know is that my son needs to be micro structured in order to keep him in check any unexpected change can set him off... It is tough, and is a learning experience for us all.. learn to trust yourself and your instincts
kathy

Bec - posted on 07/19/2011

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thank you for your reply and sorry for almost starting a new thread on a thread just thought every one here is a teenage parent helpful info thanks.

Dee - posted on 07/19/2011

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I am raising my sister's 12 year old. He has Asperger's, fetal alcohol effect a tic disorder and an eating disorder. He also seems unaware or unconcerned that he is different from others.

Mary - posted on 07/19/2011

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Yes, I have a 13 yo son who has Aspergers, Bipolar, ODD, Social Anxiety Disorder and a few other problems. Be happy to commiserate.

Bec - posted on 07/19/2011

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I thought i would ask heare as i thought your children are older and you would have that knowlege even thought it varies from child to child. I just noticed of late instead of every 6 months some times 3 months it seens to be comming every say 6 weeks or so for adjustment of meds? can someone please help give an estimate of what to expect?

Bec - posted on 07/19/2011

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there are so many post on here not sure if mine will be read? with teenage years and headding into teenage years as my child is 11 and a half how ofter can i expect meddication dose adjustments eg when they are young say early primary it was every 6 mnths or so what is the rough time frame for a 11 to 12 year old so i can plan and see better before the crash of meltdowns etc... i most of the time see early signs but with the growth spurts becomming more frequent I an finding it hard any help is good.

Kathy - posted on 07/18/2011

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under IDEA school has to provide free public education..they have to follow IEP that is a legal document.
I would request in writing an IEP review and placement if you want your son to continue with mainsteaming. Now there are some catches.. they don't have to follow doctor's advise they can take reccomdations under consideration....
My son's school tried to get me out of the system by strongly encouraging me to home school him. He is now is a daytreatment program and is doing well... they don't suspend have variety of therapy programs etc.... explore all options.. and yes they have pro bono education attorneys out there if you look I have one... Make a lot of noise be strong and find out what is best for your son. and prepare yourself for a fight.
kathy

Cindy - posted on 07/18/2011

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I removed my 13 year old son out of the public school for the same reasons. I finished the school year last year for 7th grade with Agora home school program. He would like to go back to public school to be involved with 2 boys that he gets along with, but not sure what kind of resistance I will get from the school district in dealing with his IEP and such. These same 2 boys can be very hurtful at times as well.

Cindy - posted on 07/18/2011

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Yes, I have a 13 year old son recently diagnosed with Aspergers and ADHD. What kind of specific issues are you dealing with? Are you receiving any therapy for them?

Susan - posted on 07/17/2011

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Unfortunately, yes. He is our grandson and will turn 17 shortly. It is a difficult thing to deal with but he has made strides throughout his life. Social settings are difficult because he doesn't realize some of the things he says are not appropriate in groups. He is not shy and when it is brought to his attention feels embarrassed at times. I would like to talk with you more but it is late and I can address some other issues and would like to see how you are handling your situations. I pray, a whole lot! God has brought me through some really difficult times because it is so stressful. I look forward to chatting further. God Bless!!

Kathy - posted on 07/17/2011

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i have a son who was diagnosed at age 12 he just turned 14 but is emotionally stunted at age 6. Although intellegent(still low iq(80) he also has a lot of impulse control issues, aggression issues etcc. I ended up writing a book soon to be published because of lack of care especially for duel diagnosed kids. Things like social isolation, emotional isolation not just for children but for family is well. My marriage didn't survive this. Health care laws, school accountability etc needs to change.... glad I found a support group
kathy

Aurelia - posted on 07/14/2011

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I have a 15 year old with aspbergers n to be honest I don't think the school is very supportive. I have seen kids be so mean n it breaks my heart. She doesn't socialize with peers her age. It is very hard n heart breaking to watch. She is vulnerable n am scared for to be taken advantage of.

Linda - posted on 03/24/2011

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my baby cousin is 16- i refer to her as my baby cousin because im very close to her and she is the youngest girl cousin , i also use to babysit her alot when she was a baby and i love her so much , it breaks my heart because she had a boyfriend- which she hid very well until she was going out with him for 3 months and he was 18 and doesnt have aspergers but he and she shared many of the same interests , she is obsessed with him and he took her virginity and now he has broken up with her and she is devestated , i have tried my best to tell her that this happens to all teenagers and i just feel so sorry for her , shes just so beautiful and smart and i hate seeing her like this and i wish there was something i could say to help her understand because she thinks he is going to ask for her back but i dont think he will as his parents dont like her because she has aspergers.they havent said it but they dont want her over becaus e when they have visitors , they feel embarrased because she talks alot and is loud. bloody assholes i hate them , she is loud and talks alot but i could listen to her all day , im proud of who she is.god love her.

Mary Gina - posted on 12/15/2010

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Wow it is like you know my son and wrote about him! He also had a good deal of medical issues, and I just thought he was a little difficult. Looking back there were so many signs there that I completely missed. He is now 13 and has his diagnosis, and we have been homeschooling as well. He is extremely gifted, however his social issues with the students in school was not great. That did not compare to the social issues with the teachers though. I worry so much about him not being able to hold down a job when he gets older. I am so glad I found this page. I had no idea there were so many people dealing with the same issues I am!

Laura - posted on 07/29/2009

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my oldest is aspeger and cp (mild) and i find diet helps my sanity.

she doesnt seem upset by the difference but choosed to challenge

others for picking on kids in wheelchair or that are different.

she doesnt seem to realize those kids she is defending is like her

she seems to aline herself with the administrative and teachers in her

schools

Missy - posted on 07/28/2009

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I have a16 year old with Asperger syndrome and other issues and an 11 year old on the spectrum...my 16 year old is going to be a sophomore in HS and it has been a challenge...HS has been better than middle school...I am always looking for someone he can hang out with because he does not really have any friends or that type of peer relationships...it is really hare

Joan - posted on 07/28/2009

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My daughter has failed the driver's test 3xs because she hasn't read the manual! She really isn't interested in driving and I'm not really pushing because of her attention span. Plus the longer we wait, the lower out insurance bill will be. Her 16-year-old brother is the same, not really interested in driving. He has said that he knows landmarks but not how to get between them. So, I'm not pushing him either. Their peers don't seem to give them any pressure, at least, not that I have heard.

Darlene - posted on 07/27/2009

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I have a 15 year-old son with Asperger's Syndrome. When he was diagnosed we were told that he is not 100% AS because he can tie his shoes, ride a bike, and play sports. But AS was the closet and most accurate diagnosis the psychologist could determine. We've had a lot of issues with school. Grades are a challenge but he's managed to do fairly well. He has to complete regular classroom assignments and take the same tests but his IEP allows for him to go to be able to re-take the test in a different format. Same test just presented differently. In our school each grade has a special ed teacher that takes them one class period per day. Basically, it's a tutoring session. In that class the students work on homework, review for tests, and work on weak areas. He's starting 9th grade in a couple of weeks. I'm terrified. He turned 15 in April and in Alabama you get a driver's permit at 15. He failed the test but only because he didn't study. He would do fine if he would simply study but I can't get him to look at the manual. I'm afraid the other students will make fun of him. It's probably silly for me to worry about this driver's permit but certain other students look for things to embarrass or humiliate him.

Nancy - posted on 07/27/2009

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yes, I have ason who is 18 with aspergers,adhd,ocd,overanxious disorder,hypotonia,echolaylia plus a few others. He has received help since before he got in school so we were lucky. He graduated this year but he is going back to school for three more years as a super senior. We have had very good luck with the teachers in his school. Just keep asking for help and do not stop. There are web sites you can go on to learn about this. My son is now reading a book on Coping with a Learning disability. It is not your problem just keep pushing them for help.

Barbara - posted on 07/25/2009

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Wow! It seems that since my son was diagnosed with Aspergers in 1997, his diagnosis was one of the earliest. We knew something was different, but several teachers told us that his behavior was common in gifted children who start school early. It was only after we had moved twice, once to get a better school district for my son, that a new pediatrician noticed behaviors that reminded him of his own autistic brother. If it hadn't been for that connection, we might still be trying to work with the ADHD/Gifted label he had been given. Behavior modification has done wonders, as has role play teaching, and strict scheduling. NO SURPRISES! We found a great website called "wrong planet" over 10 years ago, and the links it led us to had some really good ideas. Every teacher he had was given a copy of the information we had found, all the way up to high school. In second grade, he was recommended for behavioral/emotionally handicapped special ed placement. The following summer, we learned what was really going on, and began to work through it. By fifth grade, 2 school districts later, he was in the gifted/talented program. By the time he finished high school, he was in the top 5% of his class, and was offered a scholarship to a military college (Norwich University). His application essay was based on living with Aspergers. Unfortunately, he had some difficulty making the transistion to college and lost his scholarship. He is now living back home and going to community college. He doesn't drive, takes the bus or walks everywhere, and will probably never live totally on his own. We are planning to build a new house, and the plans include an apartment over the garage for him.

Many of the parents have commented on the social skills lack and the high intelligence in concrete subjects such as math and science, but poor skills in abstracts. That is the key to Aspergers. So many parents are given a diagnosis, and not given the information to deal with it. It is called the "absent-minded professor syndrome" for a reason. We have to get creative to find ways to deal with it and TEACH our children the things other children figure out on their own. Tough job, I know, I've been doing it for 12 years.

Joan - posted on 07/24/2009

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Karen,
I would love to talk to you. I don't know what I can add to help out, but, I know any piece of information helps. My kids are 19 and 16 so they are way ahead of yours. But I have been where you are now. You mentioned your daughter asked questions that embarrasses people. One thing we have taught our kids is to try and recognize "inside" thoughts and questions as opposed to regular ones. "Inside" thoughts are those in your head. They stay there until a quiet time to ask Mom and Dad, not before.
Hope this helps a little.
Joan

Karen - posted on 07/23/2009

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I have a 7 year old who was diagnosed with Asperger's during this past school year. I was wondering if you and I can communicate further. I am trying to figure this out and I would like to find out what you experieinced so far. How old are your kids? I know so far my daughter has a lot of issues with listening and she asks everyone questions that makes them feel uncomfortable. Since her school has diagnosed the problem she has been seeing a social worker there. I am also in the process of finding a child psychiatrist for her. Please get back to me if you would like to discuss further.

Skye - posted on 07/23/2009

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I only have a 5 year old son & a 6 year old stepson. they both have aspergers so any advice you could give me would be appreciated

Tina - posted on 07/22/2009

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I hadn't thought about hormonal changes making the meds obsolete. Did you notice a significant improvement when they were stopped, Krystal?

My daughter has also diagnoses of Adhd, OCD and O.D.D. but I think these are just descriptions of what Aspergers entails. Am I right?

I also wonder if homeschooling is counterproductive to learning social skills? I've been tempted to do it several times, but things haven't gotten too horrible at school thus far. I would be willing to homeschool if I felt it necessary though.

Jonnell - posted on 07/22/2009

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Yes my 14 year old son has pdd and is entering 9th grade this year. He is very much a loner and doesnt have any friends. But in a way that is a good thing for him, because there is no peer pressure he his is own thinker not like my 16 year old daughter who thinks school is a place to meet boys and doesnt accomplish anything. Michael does like to help younger children, so he wanted to sign up for big brothers and we let him.

Krystal - posted on 07/22/2009

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My 14 year old daughter has Asperger's. She was diagnosed between the ages of 12 & 13. We had always been told she was ADD & ADHD until we got a proper diagnosis. She has ADD as well. She was medicated up until the age of 13 when she went thru hormonal changes and the medication began to work backwards. She is no longer medicated. Half way thru the school year last year (8th grade) I had to pull her out and homeschool her for the rest of the year due to severe problems at school. She seems to have gotten back on the right track and this year will re-enter public school. Her psychiatrist advised, since she enjoys video games as so many of them do, to let her play games such as The Sims. She says it helps them to learn some of the social skills neccessary. I have also found that having a pet helps. It seems to have taught her some sympathy as well as empathy.

Jeanette - posted on 07/21/2009

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Yes, my younger son is 16 (turns 17 in October) and was diagnosed in 5th grade. He is bright and has always done well in school--not straight As but As and Bs, and he tests well. Like others, he prefers solitude to company most of the time. He hates chit chat and plays video games and watches TV shows that most of his peers stopped watching about three or four years ago (Pokemon and Yugio card collecting and tournament play are his favorities). He also loves animals and raises snakes, hoping to breed and sell them as an avocation, if not a vocation. For years he was bullied in school, and the school didn't know how to deal with it. All the focus was on him, counseling him and drugging him so he conforms to society's expectations, and until I got him to my school (I teach high school), which is a magnet for Autism Spectrum disorder kids, no one worked on educating his peers to be accommodating to his needs. He loves to make puns and has gotten better about outbursts, learning to control his temper, over the past year or so. He takes all mainstream classes, but has an IEP so his teachers know he needs structure, semi-quiet classes, and he has auditory processing difficulties, so his lecture notes need to have a visual component or he will get lost and panic. He has a speech therapist who calls him in once a week to work in a group of kids with Asperger's, and I think that is what has helped him the most. What I worry about most now is how he will cope once he graduates and has more independence thrust upon him. I have an older brother, age 54, who was never diagnosed, but now that I have read about Asperger's and attended a Tony Atwood conference where he went through the range of symptoms, I am convinced my brother has it. My brother was a National Merit Scholar but rarely had any friends. He depended upon my parents to be his friends when he needed to socialize, but he often stayed in his room listening to classical music. He developed an obsession with collecting books and anything related to stereo equipment or music. He had trouble staying focused in college, dropping any class he didn't have an A in, and he finally dropped out without a degree. He became very secretive, keeping a P.O. box so we didn't see his mail, and ran up credit card debt on his collection obsession. He got two storage lockers for his stuff and paid $250. a month to keep them, even though he never had a job that paid more than $10.00 an hour or so (usually stereo sales). My parents felt sorry for him, so they never charged him rent or made him move out. Finally, my last parent (my dad) died this year so my brother HAD to move out and he used part of his inheritance to buy a mobile home, but he only earns about $1000. a month and the rent is about $500. I am worried that he will run out of money and not know how to take care of himself and when I look at him I see everything I don't want to happen to my son.

Susan - posted on 07/20/2009

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Hi, I am a grandmother who has dealt with my grandson from day 1. We have custody and have been through every venue you can imagine. Right now he is 14, will be 15 in Nov. We just about 8 months ago got the diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome along with Bi-Polar/ADD/ADHD,, ODD, OCD, along with Separation Anxiety Disorder. Probably others can be listed. You get the idea. As of this time he is at a Methodist Children's Home where they are working with him to adapt better in social arenas and to control his
anger and much more. He is such a loving child and has a huge heart. My heart aches
to see him have to deal with these things. We travel twice a month with one way being 5 hours. So if anyone can relate to what you have to deal with, then that would be me, I do believe. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your children especially in a school setting because some schools do not have any idea what our children really have to deal with. Thought processes not being the same as us. Acting before processing. Really meaning to cause no harm but can't help themselves. Compulsivity? They get over stimulated at family functions let alone school activities. Awareness is the KEY! Getting the school system to understand what they go through and getting them to work up a
program so that they get the education they deserve at the same time protecting them from others and protecting others from them at times. I would be more than happy to chat with you cause it sounds like you have some resources which my grandson will be needing in the near future. God Bless!

LaVee - posted on 07/20/2009

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I have an 18 year old Autistic son. It is hard on days to go through all the fun stuff that comes with Autism. We have been going day by day and trying to help him to go to the world out there. He graduated this year from high school and that was one of the proudest days of my life.

Maureen - posted on 07/19/2009

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I have a 16 y.o. son on the spectrum. He did well until April 2007 when we moved 3 hours away from where he had been raised. My husband had lost his job and we had to move for his new one. The move was a disaster for him...he is still having problems. It breaks my heart. We have tried counseling, making accomodations, etc. We are in the process of having him evaluated for anti-anxiety medication to hopefully facilitate him attending school on a regular basis. It is a nightmare.

Faith - posted on 07/19/2009

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Rosemary, My 14 year old son tried to fail 6th grade on purpose for the purpose of being in the same grade as much younger friends at least 2-3 grades behind him. We will finally try to get an assessment done in August. We're switching from public middle school to online public school from home this year. He's brilliant in math/science, but the social and classroom environment hinder him. He has a learning disability in reading, especially being weak in oral language. He currently has a wonderful counselor whom he trusts that helps him with social issues in baby steps. He's now working on relating with his biological father.

Faith - posted on 07/19/2009

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Rosemary, My 14 year old son tried to fail 6th grade on purpose for the purpose of being in the same grade as much younger friends at least 2-3 grades behind him. We will finally try to get an assessment done in August. We're switching from public middle school to online public school from home this year. He's brilliant in math/science, but the social and classroom environment hinder him. He has a learning disability in reading, especially being weak in oral language. He currently has a wonderful counselor whom he trusts that helps him with social issues in baby steps. He's now working on relating with his biological father.

Rosemary - posted on 07/19/2009

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My son has aspergers disorder. His social skills are lacking. Has a hard time getting along with peers. I do get alot of help from his school and behavioal therapists. He does get along with children much younger

Carol - posted on 07/18/2009

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I am a mother of a teenager and an young adult my teenager is in the medium range of autisium and my older son is Asperger. I have dealt with all kinds of school/social issues.

Elois - posted on 07/18/2009

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Yes, I have a 14 year old daughter that was diagnosed with Autism when she was two. Now she is very productive in school and taking regular classes in high school this year, but she still has some social issues. Other family members do not even recognize her as having a problem, but she sometimes feels like she has to try extra hard. She is at that age of development where her hormones are making her disability that much harder, but I know she will get through this. She has already mapped out her future plans for college and to study abroad.

Sarah - posted on 07/17/2009

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My 10 year old has Aspergers. It's becoming very challenging now that he wants to branch out on his own more. Mostly, it's been a problem for me, not knowing what to do with myself now that he doesn't need me quite so much. I'm always worried he's going to come across something that scares him, or confuses him, or hurts him, and I won't be there to hold it all together for him. But that's my problem, not his.

Parenting an Asperger's child has been a gift from God. He has shown me so much, taught me so much.He may not understand or be able to voice what his feelings are, he may not be able to empathise with how other people feel, but he loves, he loves so deeply.

His grade school has been most supportive, his principal and teachers are very involved with his educational career. He is in a modified program, about a year behind his age group intellectually. The emails fly between home and school, passing ideas back and forth for helping him even more. Community Living Parry Sound helped us get funding relief for disabled kids, and now he can have a computer, and books, and learning trips that we could never afford to take him on before. He has Respite, an adult person who works with Community Living comes and takes him out once a week for "developmental time away from mom and dad"; they go out for lunch and he has to order for himself, they visit people at the local pool, they just drive around and talk to each other. It's a great program, because it gives our Aspergers son some time to branch out on his own (I am very over-protective of him) AND it gives my husband and I time to spend with our other children. Community Living also got him into Art Camp, Movement Camp, Environmental Camp and Swim Camp this summer, and he made a pen pal from Queensland Australia (where he wants to live when he's a grown up.)

Day camps have been amazing for him. He's too nervous to stay places overnight, and he was really worried he'd have to sleep over at these camps, but once he learned that it's like a regular school day, but without homework, he was all in, and he got to make friends with other Asperger's kids. It helped him to know that he's definately not alone, he got to see other kids his age, having the same problems he has. It gave him a boost of pride.

Joanne - posted on 07/17/2009

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hi im a mum of 4 children.my eldest is adhd/asd.ive seen him go through some awfull times.he was permanatly excluded from infants at 5 and that was before he was diagnosed with anything.i had no support with him and no help.my son is 12 now and goes to a special school in dawlish for children with behavour and emmotional problems.hes alot better now

Suzanne - posted on 07/16/2009

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Quoting Brenda:

I have one with autism and is 18yrs now. HANG IN THERE! School and social issues are the worst.



My son is 15 and I agree that school and social issues are the worst.  After my son finished 8th grade in a "regular" school we decided to home school him. I think it was the best decision we could have made for him.  The first few months were hard, but he got into the routine and did much better with the program after Christmas.

Suzanne - posted on 07/16/2009

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My son is 15 and has Asperger's. We are currently home schooling him. He has had problems and challenges in the social/school area. Junior high school was a rough time for him because of teasing and bulling from other kids who just didn't understand why my son acted the way he does. It was very hard on his parents too.

Kerry - posted on 07/16/2009

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My son turned 18 yesterday. He has Aspergers. Socially these kids need a lot of exposure. The dr. told me when he was 10yrs. he had reached his learning and social limit. There is no way. Now my son is driving, working, going in to his senior year of high school. I know it is hard to find programs and help for our teens. I found that getting him involved with programs such as 4H and an individual/team sport (ours was wrestling) really made a difference. He learned how not only to make friends but keep them. These are close knit groups, it took a while but he caught on.

Alison - posted on 07/15/2009

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hi my son has all 3 problems too . we have had many difficulties through the years with him he is nearly 21 and no better . would love to chat with you .

[deleted account]

I do, my son is 15 yrs old and I did not find out about this until 6th grade when they did an assessment on him.

Annmarie - posted on 07/15/2009

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hi, my name is annmarie, i have a 16 year old daughter who has asperges, i need some suggestions and help as my daughter has had a letter from the GP, to go for a series of 3 injections, against cervical cancer. she is terrified of needles and this will be impossible to do unless there is a less stressfull way, or any help, any suggestions?

Gina - posted on 07/15/2009

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Hi Joan. I don't know if you've heard of or are familiar with handle.org, but if not, may want to check it out. My child is extraordinary in different ways than yours, and I honor and appreciate you mothering your extraordinaires as best you can. I have had some amazing results using some of the exercises from the site above with some Asperger boys I've worked with in my Imagery Therapies practice. God Speed. - Gina

Anne - posted on 07/14/2009

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I have an 18 yr old son who was diagnosed with Autism Sprectrum Disorder when he was 3. He will be a senior this year in public school. They work with him on how to fill out applications, practice job interviews, job shadows, etc. Opportunities Inc (a place that works solely with disabled people in the work environment) comes into the school to work with them, they hired him for a janitorial job at their place this year so they could work with him outside of the school atmosphere as well. I know there is also a program where they will send a trainer in with them to a job to work one on one with the person. The social aspect is a hard one-mine is very quiet and doesn't understand a lot of different forms of humor, so he gets upset over things he shouldn't or just doesn't understand. He mostly stays in his room and plays X-box 360, or watches a movie over and over again. He has come out of his shell a bit in the last year or so and has started to do a little bit of socializing and-there goes the phone bill-texting!! I know the lack of friends bothers him sometimes, but I think it bothers my husband and I more, it's a constant worry where his future is concerned.

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