Are there any natural Medication's that work with autism - anxiety and meltdowns? I don't want RISPERDAL to be the answer.

Melissa - posted on 02/19/2009 ( 106 moms have responded )

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Hi every one, I have a 5 year old boy with Autism/Asperger's. I have done the early intervention programme and all the recommended therapies but my son still has many problems with anxiety and daily meltdown's especially when he's having trouble self regulating, there also starting to physically impact on me as it can be quit exhausting trying to handle him so he doesn't harm himself during this time.
My pediatrician suggested I consider using RISPERDAL if his behavior continues to disrupt family and school life? he also said that most autistic boys need to be medicated between the ages of 6 to 8? I don't feel comfortable with this methods and was wondering if anyone knew of a Natural Medication? Thank you for any advice!

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Melissa - posted on 03/14/2009

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Hi Corri,
I would like some more info on this, so if you don't mind can you email me at melissandkeith@hotmail.com. I assume you live in Australia? where about's?
Thanks, Melissa.

Corri - posted on 03/13/2009

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My 10 year old son has HF Autism, he began taking a special autism recipe of AUSTRALIAN BUSH FLOWER ESSENCES when he was 6, which greatly improved his anxiety and speech. It works for him ( and me). I hope you can find some at a health store/ naturopath. Otherwise, it is available on the internet. You will need someone to make up the autism recipe, but you can start with "Emergency Essence" and "Calm and Clear".

Good luck

Melissa - posted on 03/13/2009

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Hi everyone,
thank you all so much for your valuable input. I have thought long and hard about this topic and have decided for the time being I'm going to head down the Natural road first. I have spoken to a qualified Naturopath, Dietician & Pediatrician who have advised in their opinions I should try the GFCF Free Diet, because Autistic children in most cases have Irritable Bowel Syndrome or Leaky Gut Syndrome which means the bowel does not break down the Gluten and Dairy properly thus turning into peptides which have a morphine effect on the brain exacerbating Autistic behavior and prevents them thinking clearly.
I have researched this Diet and it seems to work on children who only have ASD (autism spectrum disorder) and not a secondary problem like ADHD, Tourettes or Medical condition ect. I'm also implementing additional vitamins and minerals to ensure he remains healthy. We are removing Dairy first and replacing it with Soy for one month before we start to remove Gluten - wheat from his diet. I have been advised that it will take at least 7 month's before we will see a result, if any. I think it's a natural option that won't hurt him or our family if it doesn't work and at this present time I have exhausted all other avenues.
Thank you all for the advice on medications and I think even though it is warranted in some cases it does scare me to put such a young child on these medicines and not knowing how they will effect him when he get older is even more scary. I suppose it's part of being the Mother of an Autistic child. xox

Sasha - posted on 03/13/2009

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My thinking when Alec was little was 'do the work now so I don't have to do double later'. Pulling him out of school and keeping him at home realy helped. He still has the 'one person at school and another at home' thing going on, and since being let down by, and then lied to by his biological father in febuary he has hit a massive downward slope. When things are realy bad a period on medication can realy help get over the bumps, but all drugs have side effects, no matter how benign they appear. Over time these do accumulate. In adition, the body builds up a resistance, so a higher dose is needed for the same effect. This is true for all drugs. I too had a period where I was covered in bite marks, nail gauges, huge bruises, and very little sleep. Eventualy these kids grow up. They need to hav the oporunity to find ways to controle their own impulses, and also to recognise when they are not coping and asking for help. This is not an easy road, and no matter how hard it gets for me I always try and remember that he is locked up in that head, and can never get away from it. His meltdown are always the result of SOMETHING and until he is able to identify the cause and deal with it I know they will happen again and again, no medication will solve it, just put a patch on the issue until he is strong enough to realy deal with it all. These kids have the normal range of thoughts and feeling, they just have no insight into them. That is a very scary place to be.

Regina - posted on 03/12/2009

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Beth

In response to your response after mine,

My son is also very smart and verbal and will do whatever it takes to get what he wants also. I send his food to school and have in in his IEP that he gets nothing else. I also attend all his parties to make sure he only eats the treats I provide. He is 4 1/2 and we have taught him from the very begining that those foods will make him sick. Anyway, the other day it was a little girls birthday at preschool and she brought cookies. His teacher gave him a cookie that I had sent, he ate that and then went around telling all the kids to not eat theirs cause it would make them sick. We were cracking up! Anyway, my point is for my son the diet and supplements have helped him tremendously.

Angel - posted on 03/12/2009

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Your welcome, just hope it helps.  Kiddo's are like snow flakes, no two are alike. What works for one, may not for another.  I understand how having a "special needs" child can effect family life, just more reason to do what your doing, taking in all the facts you can and make  what you believe to be the right choice.  I don't belive  that there is a  right or wrong for meds, just what is right for your situation. Let's face it, with any child, "special needs" or not, raising children is a trial and error kind of thing, unless there's a manual out there that I missed. :)

Apps+8278986302 - posted on 03/12/2009

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What I should have said is that this is for our son and our family. We all need relief. We have been living in chaos for far too long. There is a great kid here who I love so much being held back by his incredibly tough issues.

Apps+8278986302 - posted on 03/12/2009

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Thanks again. I'm well aware of scary side effects like tics, but thanks for mentioning for anyone who isn't. Our son doesn't have Tourettes and we are not doing this for the teachers; this is for me, for our family. The tantrums in our home are out of control and I can't handle him anymore, he's little but he's strong and when he's lost it, he's totally unreachable. I am encouraged by those of you with older kids who have posted to say things have gotten better with time. I pray for this. I'll also check out the site, though I think I may have already. Thanks again, Beth

Angel - posted on 03/12/2009

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I have heard that there is a link between Risperdal and tics or make them worse, so you may want to watchout for that. My son has both AS and Tourette's Syndrome.  We tried him on Risperdal early on for  TS but took him off because of side effects.  We tried meds when he was 4-5 and then again when he was 8-9, he has NOT been on meds since he was 9. I didn't think it was fair for him to be doped up just to make it easier for the teachers. Because his social problems began to interfer with his academics, and the teachers were not well trained, I started homeschooling him when he was in 7th grade. After 3 months the meltdowns began to subside, they became sparatic after 3 more months. That was 3 years ago. He is now 15 and still does not take any meds and no real meltdowns (he's acts like a "normal" teenager, if there is such a thing lol).  It's funny because  I was going through the posts and it has been so long since he has had a meltdown that I had  forgotten he used to have them!  I guess my suggestion would be to do what your doing: research, get other's stories, weigh the good and the bad and do what is best.  Good luck!

Apps+8278986302 - posted on 03/12/2009

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The key reason we haven't gone the diet route is that our son, now 5 1/2,  is so smart and determined, he will definitely get what he wants. His favorite foods are wheat and dairy. Haven't any of you doing the diets been undermined by a kid who could connive another kid to swap food at lunchtime, who charms adults into giving him candy (ours does it with our doorman every day when he gets off the bus, and now it's a ritual with him!), who loves pasta and bread of all kinds and all diary and has rejected all attempts at giving him wheat-free products (the only thing he liked were some wheat-dairy-sugar-free cookies; I liked them, too!)? Not to mention a school that can't or won't enforce the diet; you should have seen the load of candy he collected on Halloween (most of which I got rid of), plus it's a token-system school with a store where they can buy things, including candy, if they earn enough points for good behavior (and don't lose points for inappropriate behavior) by Friday each week. One thing I may try first is eliminating more of the colorings and additives. Ironic since I've gone the meds route, I know, but this can't be good for anyone. I believe the EEC has already outlawed these, it could take another 10 years before the U.S. does it. (Although now that Michelle Obama has gone public with her push for healthy eating, maybe it could happen sooner.)



Anyway, we started a tiny bit of Risperdal yesterday in addition to the morning Adderall XR (extended release, which gets him through school). I'll try to keep you posted, but you're all free to contact me as well. Believe me, it's been a long road to get to this point--after I had repeatedly shown the bite marks on my arm to the school psychiatrist and begged and pleaded with the psychologist. They see none of this behavior at school, only the ADHD, and even then they weren't convinced how hard he was until we finally sent him to school a couple of days off the Adderall. Before that this psychiatrist was telling us they wish they had 100 Matthews!!!



Here's the think: I'm desperate. I can't go on living this way. Our hope that if he's less agitated and violent he might actually start absorbing more of the behavioral stuff. We hope this isnt' forever. Keep your fingers crossed for me this works. And thank you, thank you Julia for your post about getting your son's stool tested. No one has mentioned this to me but now I'll be award of that as well as the side effects you always hear; of course we will be hypervigilant to watch for those. Yes, it's scary stuff. But we've been conservative, we've waited as long as we could. We love our boy but we can't live with him this way anymore. Best, Beth

Regina - posted on 03/12/2009

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Hello, I have a 4 1/2 yr old son with ASD we too have experienced behavioral issues with him so I know what you are going through. We decided to go the all natural approach and I noticed a huge difference when we eliminated food allergies from his diet and food dyes and preservatives(all these especially added together can cause hyperactivity, sleeplessness, agressiveness, OCD behaviors and lack of focus). We also took it a step further and follow the GFCFSF diet as well as biomedical treatments with him through a DAN doctor. Has been expensive, but well worth it. I am getting my son back a little everyday. Hope this helps!

Karen - posted on 03/11/2009

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i have a 12 yr old that had pdd and adhd he is very aggressive and abusive and it is very disruptive to school and home he is on lots of meds risperdal is just one of them.... do they work there is a change when he forget to take them wow there is a difference... do i like them NO.. i have checked out ofther things i talked to a chropracor (sorry about spelling) and he thinks that realining an autstic child and getting the toxins from the vacines out f there body does wonders and will keep them off the meds... i dont know if it will work and dont know if i can afford to find out .. if anyone has tried this and knows it work let me know .. i have a lot of in put i have been dealing with it for a while i also work in a group home with autistc adults if i can help let me know karen

Barbara - posted on 03/11/2009

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WOW! Hope you are able to sort through all of this. There is a lot here. A lot of good advice. What I have to say is from 29 years of experience not only with our son, but with other children. I believe the worst mistake I made in all those years was to allow drugs to be administered. That is the one thing I would change. We tired a lot of natural things including mega vitamins. Only one product worked and has been working for the last six years. And our son was 26 when he began drinking the product. Respond to me if you want to know more. There are answers out there. Keep the faith and keep looking.

Heidi - posted on 03/11/2009

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There are some safe, natural and beneficial products that do work with kids who has Autism/Asperger's. And the best thing about them is that they are not medication. The products put your body, in this case, your child in a state to heal itself. Very ligitimate company and they are hooked up with Autism speaks, with many, many testimonials and could even put you in touch with people who have been through this and had huge success with the products. Would love to talk with you

Kim - posted on 03/10/2009

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I don't know if you have ever heard of the company Melaleuca, but I just joined and received some pretty amazing testimonials of what the vitamins alone did for several autistic children. E-mail me if you are interested in hearing more about this company.

hunter1@xplornet.com

Julia - posted on 03/08/2009

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All of these posts are really great to hear about others' experiences.  My son is 5 (6 in June) and has been on risperdal since he was 3.  When it started, it was a life-saver.  It allowed him to sleep at night and increased his appetite.  Since then we had his stool and blood tested and found serious deficiencies in absorption and good bacteria levels.  He is now on omega 3 supplements, probiotics, reduced glutathione, tenex (FDA approved for hypertension), nystatin for the yeast is his colon, melatonin for sleep at night, taurine (an amino acid) spectrum complete (vitamins specialized for spectrum kids), and, of course the risperdal. It sounds like a lot, but most of it is naturally occurring in the body that he just cannot absorb, or produce on his own.  He is doing very well.  Some say they can't even tell he ever had autism.  He still has his moments of frustration when he doesn't get what he wants. He still gets a little over-stimmed sometimes, but for the most part, he is much better. Hopefully, we can continue to test him until these meds and supplements can be eliminated.

Apps+8278986302 - posted on 03/06/2009

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Thank you, Connie. Our son is already on the Adderall but it's clearly either the wrong thing or just isn't enough, hence our considering Risperdal. It's been a long road to get to this point, but we're here.

Connie - posted on 03/06/2009

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both my 7yr old and 4 yr old our on risperdal and it works wonders for them.  They are also on addereal for there ADHD and life is so much better.  We too were at our wits end and medication was our last option and it has worked for the last yr along with therpy

Kristen - posted on 03/06/2009

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HI Melissa, I have a 9 year old son who has a diagnosis of adhd/ IMpulse control disorder, Pdd-Nos andOppositional Defiance Disorder. He has been on medication since the age of three. I so understand the desire to not want your child on strong medications like Risperdal.  I have tryed some natural remedies, but for him meds were the only thing that seemed to control. He would have such anxiety and Panic attacks if he knew we were going to the store because he has a fear of birds and they always seems to fly ahead over the parking lots! He would get hysterical, become verbally abusive to me and scream with fingers in his ears, refusing to leave the car...and thats just geting to the store....Julian wound up being put on prozac for his anxiety which worked wonders... He has also been on Risperdal for his aggression at one point too...My sons speach really started to take off when he got on that medication. I truly feel that if you really do not want your son on these medications then certainly go to the health food store, a goodone and ask what is available, some of these stores really know what there talking about.  At the same time, sometimes there are children out there, as in my child, who only responds well with medication in order to have him function to where he is not living such an anxiety and panicd life. Noone really wants to medicate their children..it should a lways be the last resort...but dont feel guilty or bad if you need to. There are side effects and risks to everything, but most times they good will out wiegh the bad. Good luck to you...If you have any questions feel free to ask. It is always a learning experience...

Sasha - posted on 03/06/2009

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We cut out all sugar. Each time there was a slip up his behaviour would go down for a couple of weeks, then he would level out again. It was the best thing we ever did, and I don't regret the time I would spend checking ingrediants in the supermarket. We did try the gluton free thing, and the difference was minimal. I think it is a good idea to try out diet changes before going for medication. My son has been back eating suger for less than a year, and not being used to it does not use much when he adds it into things.

Misse - posted on 03/06/2009

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Hi, I have a son who is 11 years old with autism. My son was diagnosed at the age of 2. We went through so many issues with meltdowns too. One thing that I never wanted to do is put my son on any meds. So till this day he is med free. I do use supplements and have used melatonin for sleep. Also a good website for me to search things is www.generationrescue.org its a great website on testimonies. My son is doing the gluten free wheat free diet and also doing enzymes which you would find on the website too. My son has came along way and stil is doing great. We have our ups and downs but not as bad as it was. I have taken most sugar out too. I make his own juice with a juicer. I do all the natural I can get. The diet has helped so much with meltdowns. It was like he was on a drug for the longest time. Milk was the worst. Now he is happy and is getting better everyday. Don't give up and listen to your mother instinct. Doctors don't walk in your shoes. You want him better not to cover the problem with meds.  Just my oppinion. Doctors wanted me to put my son on that stuff but it can cause liver problems and I didn't want that. There was no way they could draw blood from him to check that out. So do what you think is best, its probably the best answer. Good luck and God Bless. I'll be praying for you for your right answers.



 



Misse

Sasha - posted on 03/04/2009

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Janine, you sound like you have been so lucky. There have been been 14 at the last count who have died who I had worked with at various ages from 4 to 19.
My son has come so much further than anyone expected. Going by what I was told he should locked in a secure unit drugged up to the point of delirium sitting there banging his head against the wall (like he did at 3 and 4) totaly uncomunicative.

Raising him has been a constant exercise into dealing with problems no matter how heartbreaking it is at the time and no matter how hard it is at the time. We have got through problems that were insurmountable by looking ahead and working day to day. I begged for help over and over again, and got nothing. Now I have this amazing 16 year old boy, oozing charisma from every pore, with more talents and gifts than seem reasonable for any one person, and to be told step by step what to do in any given situation. and that's just the easy problem to cope with.

Lux et umbra vicism, sed semper amore
light and shodow by turns, but always love

Apps+8278986302 - posted on 03/04/2009

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Belleve me, we held off on meds for over two years, until our son was close to 5 .But his tantrums were so violent, his hyperactivity so great, so relentless, we finally couldn't live with it anymore, and I don't think he was happy in his own skin either. But I am not happy with any of the stimulants so far; Ritalin made him a zombie during the "peak" and downright scary violent--worse than before--when he came off it. We're on the third and best of the lot, Adderall XR, but I still don't think it's the right thing. And so we have to look to other things like Risperdal, but I'm hoping it will be done in as tiny an amount as possible. Thanks for all the suggestions; we are already doing some but you're all offering lots of other ideas. Thsi is the only helpful support group I've found and it's taken so long to find it! Beth

Jenny - posted on 03/04/2009

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I know how you feel. I too am trying to deal with a three year old. Everyone is pushing meds. on me to give him but don't know if I'm ready for it. He's only three...how do I know what will be good for him. I find that just going one on one, in a quiet room, letting him know that all your attention is on him, that your there for him, helps some. I don't know how old your son is but maybe that will help some. Its stressful, I know, just hang in there.

Janine - posted on 03/04/2009

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Quoting Sasha:

Where abouts in the UK are you? My son has had nothing like this. He has had very little of anything. His school has done their best, but that isn't much. I personaly don't understand this constant 'very structured' aproach to Autistic Spectrum Disorders. This one area is the thing that makes it hardest to live life in the adult world, and yet it is pushed and ingraned futher. When a child has OCD everything is done to try and desensitise the child. The removal of all distractions is all well and good, but the real world is not like that. So following this model, during the time when the brain is at it's most pliable the aspects that are disableing our children are so encouraged and rewarded that there is no going back. Ultimatly our children are headed for the real world, which is not Autism friendly. I have known of so many aspies and HF auties who have died in college or early adulthood, some by accident, others by misadventure and lots by suicide. We all want to protect our kids, and make their lives less stressful, but when do we cross the line? When is 'protecting' cocooning?



Good grief! how many have you known who have died?



Our son was virtually suicidal in his previous school; before we withdrew him & home educated, before he started in the provision. For his age, the previous school was the "real world". It was a good school, but he couldn't cope. Leaving him there wouldn't have led to him being able to cope.



In the real world our son is still going to need a level of understanding by those around him. He gets that at the school he's at, but they don't wrap him in cotton wool; they help him to understand his trggers and understand ordinary people & ther reactions to him. They also teach him strategies which, hopefully, he'll be able to transfer to life after school.



Also hopefully, the Autism Bill, if it goes through, will be another step towards the better understanding of ASD in the real world. The Disability Discrimination Act is a good act that people need to use in order to get the adjustments that our kids need now, and into the future.



We have already started to prepare our son for life after school by supporting his chosen career path and we'll continue to guide him towards independant living, using all of the available support networks and services that are out there. Thinking outside the box is key, as is helping ordinary people to understand.

Kathleen - posted on 03/03/2009

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Hi, I am new here and hope you all don't mind if I chime in.



I have a 15 yr. old Aspie/ADHD son who wa on all kinds of meds.



Ritalin, strattera, mood stabilizers, anti-depressants etc.  You name it.



About 3 years ago, I weaned him off everything (Check w/doctor before ever



doing this!) and put him on a daily dose of Omega 3 oils and probiotics.



His mood meltdowns and anxiety have done better than they ever did on any meds.



And he doesn't act like there is a dark cloud over him.  An added bonus is that we never



get sick in our house, or if we do, it is much lesser (I put the whole house on the regiment



so he didn't feel so different).  My husband's reflux is gone too.  I am not exactly sure



whether it is the probiotics or the fish oil that benefits him more.  We take Carlson's fish oil



in 1000mg tablets.  My son gets 2 or 3.  They also sell a liquid fish oil that is lemon flavored



and my youngest gets a teaspoon in his apple juice.  Keep it refrigerated and it isn't bad to



taste, REALLY.  We take the primal defense probiotics.  They sell a powdered version that



you can put in chocolate pudding or omething.  It's black so a dark food hides better.



One other thing a doctor recommended is evening primrose oil for mood swings.



Do some research, there are natural ways to help.  I take St. John's Wort and it has done



wonderful things for me too.  I am not anti-meds at all.  They just didn't work for us.



Good luck!  Hope this helps :)

[deleted account]

Im pretty sure that my fiances niece is on that exact medication. She comes to visit her dad and his side of the family every other weekend, and we all started to notice that the medicine her mom was giving her was always putting her in a daze. (Her mother gives it to her to help her sleep.) We looked it up online and it said it was for children with behavior disorders and things like that. I thought it was kind of odd that she was only getting this medication to tire her out. Shes never been out of control or "bad", so thats the only thing we could think of. Her mom was giving her this to knock her out. I dont know anything about medicine so Im no one to tell you whether to give your son this or not. Im just letting you know that yes, it helps her sleep, but shes lathargic during the day, when medication to help an autistic child shouldnt make them that way. I would change it. Of course, thats what youre saying, and you want a better and safer treatment. I dont know the answer to that, but I thought Id give you another story to go by. A negative one. Good luck, and if you figure out a good medication, please let me know.

Sasha - posted on 03/03/2009

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Where abouts in the UK are you? My son has had nothing like this. He has had very little of anything. His school has done their best, but that isn't much. I personaly don't understand this constant 'very structured' aproach to Autistic Spectrum Disorders. This one area is the thing that makes it hardest to live life in the adult world, and yet it is pushed and ingraned futher. When a child has OCD everything is done to try and desensitise the child. The removal of all distractions is all well and good, but the real world is not like that. So following this model, during the time when the brain is at it's most pliable the aspects that are disableing our children are so encouraged and rewarded that there is no going back. Ultimatly our children are headed for the real world, which is not Autism friendly. I have known of so many aspies and HF auties who have died in college or early adulthood, some by accident, others by misadventure and lots by suicide. We all want to protect our kids, and make their lives less stressful, but when do we cross the line? When is 'protecting' cocooning?

Janine - posted on 03/03/2009

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Quoting Beth:



What's an ASD provision? Where are you? We're in Brooklyn.






Hi, I'm in the UK.



 



An ASD provision, or ASD base, or ASD unit (over here) is like a good size classroom for 6 kids. Each one has their own work station, with a screen. The walls are plain to reduce distraction, there's a group working desk, changing rooms for phys ed & their own toilets, an autism specialist teacher & three learning support assistants. It;s alkl very structured with visual timetables, in trays on the left & out trays on the right etc.



But, it's in a mainstream school, so they have all the advantages of the broad range of subjects in mainstream school.



The kids spend 80% of their time in regular mainstream classes (more if they can cope) and have the base to come back to if they get stressed. They usually have one lesson (or destressing period, or homework period) per day in the base. They get to go to lunch just before the others, to miss the queue & they can bring their food back to the base, or eat with all the other kids if they want. They have their own changing rooms for phys ed so they don't have the risk of being bullied in the locker room.



When they go to mainstream classes they have a learning support teacher with them (if they want/need) and most of them have their own laptops, so they don't have to worry about handwriting.



Homework is done at school (mostly).



That's about it really. It all makes for a much easier life.

Katie - posted on 03/02/2009

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She was 8 when we started and she's been on it a little over a year now.  The only side effects we've noticed aren't bothersome for us.  She eats a little more which has been good for us as she also is a bit more willing to try new foods.  She also sleeps better on it and so we give her a smaller dosage in the morning then the one she takes before bed.  She doesn't take any other meds as we thought that we were helping her by not medicating her.  Seeing how much happier her life is on the medication, we were being short sighted and should have done this sooner.  For Mindy it helps with her tantrums and anxiety.  It is as if before you could see that she was having to not only attempt to process a request but fight with her brain to accomplish that request.  She still has tantrums but they are shorter than before and she doesn't reach them as quickly.

Apps+8278986302 - posted on 03/02/2009

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Katie, how old was your daughter when you started her on the Risperdal? Any side effects noted? How long has she been on it? Any other meds? Just it just handle the tantrums or does it also help at all with any sort of ADHD and/or anxiety? Thanks much.

Katie - posted on 03/02/2009

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We didn't want to go with Risperdal at first either.  Ended up going there and have never regretted it since.  Our daughter has definitely been helped a great deal by it.

Sasha - posted on 03/02/2009

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after a letdown by his bio-dad my son has been a total mess. The doctor pu him back on betablockers and he's been on them for 5 days now and has started smilling and laughing again for the first time since feb 7th. I don't know how long he will need on them this time. I hate drugging him, but seing him in that state, it was nesessary.

Janine - posted on 03/01/2009

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My son (now 16) hasn't had a meldown since he started in an ASD provision in a mainstream school. It's changed his life :o)

Chris - posted on 03/01/2009

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my doctor sugested putting our son omega 3 fatty acids they come in gummy form,got mine at wall mart my son is a little better on them not as hyper ,fewer temper tantrums worth a try and natural

Danielle - posted on 02/26/2009

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With Melatonen Children with sleep disorders



Several case reports have described the use of melatonin (2 to 5 mg) in children (6 months to 14 years of age). 62

Kim - posted on 02/26/2009

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I dont have a natural method idea, but my son takes medidate. It only last 8 hours so I give it to him after breakfast (before school) We have noticed a lot less melt downs,It also helps with anxiety and helps him stay focused! (waiting in line for lunch etc.) I also was very reluctant to medicate my son. This seems to work to his benefit, as his days at school are much less stressful. Hope this will help

Sasha - posted on 02/25/2009

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Hi there. I've gone the route of drugs to fix a crisis, not full time meds. Using an antihystamine can be great for one or nights sleep when they are young. I used it with my son once to many times and he went into orbit, and they never worked as a tranc again. My son is 16 now, and he does still have anxiety/depression issues. I use st johns wort, and the earlier I can start him when he's going 'down' the more effective it is. It is an amazing plant, in trials it has been found to be as good as prozac without all the side effects. My son has also had a few spells on beta-blockers. The St Johns Wort has been shown to be very good against most mood issues, and is even gaining acceptance as a supportative treatment for Schizophrenia. It is useless against bi-polar, and I have known doctors to use it in children where BP was suspected to see if it helped, and if it did, then the patient didn't have BP. In the short term try and find somthing that gives you the chance to get a good lights unbroken sleep. I know how valuable that is, and it is much easier to make an informed decision. Whatever you decide, try not to second guess yourself. The best of luck. Sasha

Apps+8278986302 - posted on 02/25/2009

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I just started another thread, "Seroquel vs. Risperdol," and our 5-year-old sounds a lot like a lot of yours; the ADHD meds aren't working, he can get extremely aggressive, esp. when we try to tear him away from some perseveration or alter the sked or during an unstructured time, and I just cannot handle him anymore. He has tested positive for a lot of food allergies but has no apparent physical reaction; I have considered the idea of gluten-free or at least color- and additive-free but our family therapist has convinced me this kid will figure out a way to get what he wants, and I agree. So we may have to go with the heavier meds. I do feel terrible about it but I don't know that I can do this much longer. It's been so frustrating getting the psychiatrist at his school listen to my plight, but our son is finally "letting it all out" there so they're beginning to get it. I just don't know that behavioral charts and visuals and all are going to solve it all, although they may help once he's been calmed down. He also has a high degree of anxiety; do the above drugs really deal with that or is a tiny amount of an antianxiety drug ever been found helpful by anyone? Thanks

Susan - posted on 02/25/2009

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Hi two of my sons has ADHD ,learning diffs and 1 also has autisum and when he was 8 i finally got some help. I had been on my own with 4 children all under 11 years old for three years and i really didn't want to put him on pills but tried everything else. He took Risperidone and Strattera and now he is 13 yrs and has been off his meds for 2 months now and is doing really well. He hasn't hurt anyone,broken anything nor tried to kill himself all because he wants to be in the Army and they wont take him until he has been off all meds for minimum of 2 years.

Nicole - posted on 02/24/2009

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if you use benadryl do the kids face any chance of dependancy or a resistance to this particular medication if he does have an allergic reaction?  I do not prefer to put my child on medication either, but he is starting to get harder for me to handle and he is only 6.  He is so strong that he is able to tackle a 12 year old to the ground easily when he sees them, just to give them a hug.  If all it takes is a little benadryl then that would be much better then using a serious medicated substance.  what about when you go out to places that are not a normal part of his routine... My boy gets really fritzy about upsetting his schedule.

Melissa - posted on 02/24/2009

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Thank you all so much for helping out with this issue and for giving me your input, you have all given me fantastic, helpful information that I will take into consideration. Thanks again, Melissa

Kathleen - posted on 02/24/2009

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melissa,



 



I dont know about you but sleep is so important .  I have taken melatonine and it works, i HAV E not tried it with my son but found that DMG helped regulate his behaviors.  In fact my son asks for it if he starts to feel out of control.  It isn't a wonder drug but for us it was.  DMG is available over the counter and is called Dimethylgylcine. or something like that... here is some info i just pulled from google:



 



 







DMG (N,N-Dimethylglycine) is a metabolic enhancer that can provide increased benefits when supplemented even if there isn’t a deficiency.


DMG makes the process of metabolism (breaking down or building up of compounds in the body) quicker and more efficient. 


DMG is a completely safe hypoallergenic nutrient. 

We don’t produce as much DMG as we grow older or if we are immune compromised, which leaves us more susceptible to stress and infection. 

DMG improves oxygen utilization, detoxification, cell protection, immune system modulation, and enhances the healing.


Extensive research with animals and in clinical testing shows that DMG is an adaptogen that helps maintain homeostasis.



Adaptogens like DMG normalize physiological functions and help maintain homeostasis within the body. These physiological functions include blood glucose levels, pH, blood pressure, hypoxic or low oxygen conditions, hormone levels, cholesterol levels, and levels of important biologically active nutrients. DMG has received a great deal of attention because it is beneficial in so many areas of human health and well being. Research and clinical studies over the last 25 years demonstrate that DMG can help the body overcome a number of specific health problems. Since DMG is cost effective and results are usually seen fairly quickly, it should be relatively easy to determine if DMG is for you!



 



An ad but none the less something to think of my son started sleeping through the night and still does for the most part.  He has a bad night once or twice a month instead of everynight.






Christina - posted on 02/24/2009

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Not sure if aggression is one of the issues you are having with your son or not, but I recently did a research paper for my anatomy & physiology class on autism and aggression. )My son is on the spectrum as well and a major issue with him is aggressive behavior.) I found some very interesting articles that show a link between abnormally high levels of serotonin in the body and aggression in autistic individuals. Getting these levels checked may be a place to start before considering medication. I would guess that there is also a test for melatonin levels to see if they are off as well.



The report was issued by the Cochrane Collaboration, I can post the link if anyone would be interested in reading it.

Sara - posted on 02/24/2009

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hi there tiffany my name is sara and I have our son that is 6 and autistic and adha on melatonin . Yes it works wonders. Glad to hear there are other people that think it is great

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