Aspergers Syndrome

Skye - posted on 01/13/2009 ( 16 moms have responded )

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my son has recently been diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome. My stepson also has Aspergers, my stepsons mother loaned me a couple of books on Aspergers, I however would like some different points of view from parents of children with Aspergers on starting school as my son is about to enter prep school at the end of the month.

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Jane - posted on 07/30/2010

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My boy is eighteen, and he's currently employed as my 13 year old's PCA. (personal care attendant). He's employed by the county, but at my house, which allows me to be the supervisor. He gets work experience, and is learning professional behavior.

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Peggy - posted on 08/05/2010

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Skye,

My son is in 10 grade and has autism/asbergers. He has been in resource classes and has had an IEP for most of his school life. This is an individual education Plan. We meet with the teachers and it is written down his goals and things he needs to work on. Ask if he is able to have an aide or helper if need be.

Jeanette has a good idea. We also did that. We bought a wipe off calendar and put what he needed to focus on. LIke doing his laundry or reading a gook. Structure will help or in my case my son wouldn't come out of his room. Would play vidio games all day. Now he comes home reads. after dinner he gets playstation time. He goes outside now and shoots hoops which he didn't do at all before. Feel free to ask anything

Donna - posted on 08/02/2010

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I too have a son 11 with aspergers and a stepson with a rare form of retardation. The one thing we noticed was how the two sometimes fed off of each other. If one is hand flapping next thing I know the other boy is to. Im suggesting two books that have helped me greatly. For ALL parents I recommend 1-2-3 Magic. With asperger children you need structure and have to be willing to explain schedules and changes as they happen. Also this is a good time to start teaching coping skills for stressful situation. The other book I recommend which made me laugh out loud is "look me in the eyes" by John Elder Robinson. Written by a man with Aspergers. Both books are easy reads.

Michelle - posted on 08/01/2010

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can any1 tell me y the kids with this condition find it hard to make friends my daughter is fine with her sisters but finds it hard 2 make friends at school she hits a lot i think to her this is a way of getting a friend

Lisa - posted on 07/30/2010

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thank you, don't know if that will work here, but I can for sure check into it, i hope to put him in a computer school, he wants to have his own business fixing pc's, its just getting him through the school...I will keep praying for God to open those doors...thanks again....Lisa

Lisa - posted on 07/30/2010

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Can anyone suggest a beginning job , I dont want him uncomfortable, what do I do? I dont want people hurting him, I am a protective mom! But, I want him to have an income. he is 20, his mind is young, but his intelligence on history, gaming, computers..etc..he is awesome to me!!

Jane - posted on 07/30/2010

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Communication is key. Any information you need, I can either get or give you. :)

AskAnAspie.com is a great starting place! Run by Aspies, they email answers to questions about Asperger's and dealing with Aspies. Great perspective!

Lisa - posted on 07/30/2010

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info@parentingaspergers.com I read a lot on this site. They will send you info from just about every aspect of Aspergers..

Lisa - posted on 04/15/2010

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Just remember keep things simple/ routine--and watch for the signs of him being nervous or upset over something--my Matt would go to the bathroom several times, or scratch the skin on his fingers with his thumbs--they are very smart--they interpret the things differently, and the things you and I take for granted--like common everyday things, like to tie a shoe lace, or a trash bag- can be a challenge to them--be patient..Good Luck..God Bless Lisa

Kerri - posted on 04/15/2010

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My son is almost 12 and has Aspergers. He is somewhat of a social misfit, but we live in a great community and everyone likes him. He does not have any close friends, but nor does he care to, so we don't make an issue of it. His teachers are excellent and he does have a teacher's aide that goes with him to class to keep him on task. He takes a med called Stratera which cuts down on the noises and the hand gestures.
His passion is also video games, and since this is where he likes to be, we accomodate. I think my son is the funniest person I know. He is loving, funny and very smart. I would not have him any other way! We accept him for who he is and don't push what doesn't need to be pushed. As he's gotten older the meltdowns are much more rare, although he did bear a grudge against his friend for about a week for pulling the eraser off his pencil.
Anyway, my point is, we just roll with it. One week he liks mustard, the next it's taboo, but whatever. That's just who he is, and that's fine by us.

Feleena - posted on 04/15/2010

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MY STEP SON WAS DIAGNOSED WITH ASPERGERS WHEN HE WAS SIX HE IS 9 NOW.IT HAS BEEN A TOUGH ROAD WITH HIM.HE ENJOYS GOING TO SCHOOL HIS ISSUES AT SCHOOL IS HE DOESNT MAKE FRIENDS HE RATHER BE ALONE.WHEN WE TALK TO HIM HE ONLY TALKS BOUT VIDEO GAMES,HE DOESNT EAT LUNCH AT SCHOOL.HE DOESNT LIKE ANYONE TOUCHING HIS FOOD.HE ALL SO HAS A.D.H.D.WHICH HE TAKES MEDS FOR.

Elizabeth - posted on 01/20/2009

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Nora, I am very interested to know what kind of sensory breaks work for your son. I know my son needs them, I just don't know what to do or suggest to the school. My email is elizsjones@gmail.com THANKS!!!

Nora - posted on 01/20/2009

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how old is your son? It somewhat depends on age, but here are some things we've done that have helped:



-make sure he understands what will happen when -- so we use visual picture schedules; I took pictures of the school and made him a map to know where to go; we review the schedule for the day before school (it changes on a 5-day cycle); we use social stories to explain what is going to happen and what is expected of him



-make sure teachers or other staff are prepared to meet his needs -- my son needs help with transitions and with handling frustration, so I usually write something up for the staff/teachers about how to help, what works best and what makes things worse



-I second the good communication suggestions. We have a communication notebook that gets sent too and from school so the teachers and I can write back and forth about anything that happens or might affect his day.



-do sensory issues need to be address? my son needs regular sensory breaks, so I make sure that either the school has tools for this or I send things from home; my son also isn't good at asking for breaks until it's past time that he needs them so I make sure that staff knows what to do



-is frustration or agression a problem? for us, I make sure that staff and teachers know the early warning signs of a pending meltdown, hopefully to stop it before it starts.



 



Hope that helps.

Jennifer - posted on 01/20/2009

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Make sure that you meet his teachers! Also inquire about any additional help he may be eligible for. My daughter is now 11. We have worked VERY closely with each of her teachers. She has had continued support from guidance, and speacial ed teachers. My daughter now sees a therapist weekly to help her adapt better in social settings. We have also started seeing an art therapist (since she loves art!) Find out what your son enjoys, and use this as a reward. (giving him extra time to devot to his passion) You can make his school experience fun, and rewarding for both of you, it just takes alot of communication between you and all of his teachers. You will be shocked at how willing the teachers are to listen to you. They want to make it work as much as you do! Good luck!

Jeanette - posted on 01/19/2009

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hi my son has just been diagnosed with aspergers after fighting for 5 years just take each day has it comes, my son has some days where the change is difficult but some days he is ok explain to the school ur sons condition and get the support from the school, if he his in a good school they will support you, does he like routine because when he starts school put everything that u do into his daily routine and he will soon get used to the new routine cause we did this before he was diagnosed and we still continue to do this from jeanette

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