do all children on asd have mr?

Christal - posted on 08/24/2012 ( 26 moms have responded )

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i saw someone posted that most people with autism have mr...is this true?

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Jennifer - posted on 08/24/2012

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It's possible that people who are diagnosed w/ ASD & MR (Mitral Valve Prolapse) have a condition called Fragile X Syndrome. It mirrors ASD for symptoms & those people can have MR. I found that information at a site called awares.org. I wouldn't know otherwise.

Katlyn - posted on 10/02/2012

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I would agree with both Susan and Katherine. Language is powerful and our kids are looking to us to be their biggest advocates. Every human has weaknesses and strengths and can be labelled. Being accepting of our children does not involve accepting other peoples biases, ignorance or negative projections.

Monica - posted on 09/03/2012

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Remember that MR just like ASD are just titles. This doesn't mean that children will not be able to progress and achieve different goals. I am a Board certified behavior therapist and clinical director of an amazing company crystal minds new beginning. Crystal Minds New Beginning uses an Integrational approach to therapy. It combines fragments and pieces of Occupational therapy, speech therapy, art therapy, physical therapy and Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). We also use VB-MAPP, developed by B.F.Skinner, which is a verbal approach to behavior analysis. All of our programs have a verbal component to it whether it is ASL (sign language training), PECS (Picture communication exchange System) and other forms of verbal behaviors, including further development of Tacts, Mands and intra-verbals. We also understand that apart from speech and behavior, academic enhancements help individuals develop healthy self-esteems and prepare them for the later years of their lives therefore we also offer academic enhancements and tutoring programs to get your child on track!

For any questions please visit www.cmnbtherapy.com or email us at info@cmnbtherapy.com

Lisa - posted on 08/25/2012

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NO WAY! My high-functioning autistic son is also in the gifted program at his school. I think most kids with Asperger's are also gifted. It's also not uncommon for low-functioning autistic individuals to have savant abilities in some field - whether it's math, art, music - stuff like that.

Anaquita - posted on 08/24/2012

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If you mean mental retardation, by MR? No. Not all. Generally high functioning autism/aspergers, and pdd-nos do not. They have social deficits, and other problems, but academically are fine. Some of the more severe, and lower functioning do.

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Susan - posted on 10/04/2012

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i have read it...and my point is the same...think before you speak, because everyone is looking towards the parent to be the best example, in breaking down the barriers of people understanding autism.

This was in no way a personal slight to you or anyone else...and i don't really know what purpose your statement serves other than to get everyone angry 'en masse'...which for me does not achieve anything of benefit to parents...i don't have time or energy to waste on being angry and resentful of other people...i'm only interested in finding practical strategies for my family and sharing this with others...

Christal - posted on 10/04/2012

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Susan, and who ever else DIDN'T read what i was saying correctly!!!!! Ugh, some idiot said on CIRCLE OF MOM's posted that "most children with autism have some sort of MR"; I DID NOT for one second agree with this since MY son is very intelligent ( as most of our children ARE, no matter where they r on the spectrum!)...I found it Very Insulting for people to bash me for even posting the questio; which was for me to see exactly HOW MANY of you actually agree with that idiot! Ya know, i came on this site like everyone else, to find answers n to share my experiences, Some mom's r just toooo quick to get snappy! RELAX!!!!!! I would never Scold, insult, or even think of belittling our children! Susan, READ the question AGAIN!

Susan - posted on 10/04/2012

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yes...i agree with all that you have said Marlena...the good news is that projects are ongoing for adults with autism...well they are in Scotland...it's early days, but it is a start...the other part of that that i am concerned with is independent living for adults with autism...because all our kids grow up to be adults...by independent living, i mean affordable accomodation, your own front door key...with the option of support...which can vary depending on needs...for our kids to be succesful in the work setting (as some of them can)...they need the right support...

Marlena - posted on 10/04/2012

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Yeah they are pretty amazing kids. I recently read that in Switzerland companies are offering jobs to those with autism and putting them in teams to help balance out things that are up to par like language and people skills. I personally jumped for joy when reading this, because it is helping them become a bit more independant while allowing them to provide for themselves, a notion that I myself have lost many nights of sleep from. I really hope that they start programs like this all over the world. I think something like that might actually help them come out of their shells and boxes a little more. They are all given a task or two to do on a daily basis, which plays into the repitition tick, without over stimulation.

Marlena - posted on 10/04/2012

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Anyways, back to the question at hand. These people with Autism, be it mild or severe, have minds of their own. They are no more mentally retarded than any of us here. They think differently, sure. But who is to say that one way of thinking is wrong or another is right. We as humans tend to shy away from things that are different rather than embracing them as they are no strings attached. As many mothers of autistic children can tell you, it is something we do everyday that is as easy as breathing. People on the spectrum in my experience are less likely to lie, are quite up front without other motives, and overall show you things with their actions in place of words that can be miscommunicated. It was once said that actions speak louder than words. Actions are universally understood and can communicate a great deal more than the average joe realizes. Autism in a way protects these people from seeing alot of the down right cruel things that happen in this world today. Unfortunately it also tends to make them a target of ignorance, which can not be helped.

Susan - posted on 10/04/2012

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oh Marlena...what a lovely story...it can be so hard to reach them, when they are struggling with language...you did the best thing and used a visual aid to help him express his deeper feelings..bless you...you're a fab mom and you can feel the love that you share between you... your son sounds wonderful......they really are beautiful souls, aren't they? ;))

Marlena - posted on 10/04/2012

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Yes we really are. I often find myself looking at things that he does when he zones out and trying to think of all the possible things that he could be seeing and the ways he could be seeing them. I think the happiest moment thus far was after years of trying to potty train him he said to me he does not need his diaper. then he took one of the dry ones and put on his bear and it has stayed on his bear for a few months now. He still is not fully trained, but always wakes up dry. His bear also has a band-aid. The story behind that one was he was playing with the son of my friend that is two weeks younger than him. The younger child is developmentally more advanced than my son. The other child told my son that he can't even speak German (we live in Germany) and that he only speaks bad English, that he is too stupid to play with, and he did not want him in his house anymore. I promply reminded this child that Alex does not speak very much but does speak decent English and German, but you have to listen closely to hear it. I also reminded him that all Germans MUST learn English in grade school at a young age, so if my son does go to school, he will have an advantage. I collected my son who was in tears and screaming. He said he hurt on the inside and that wyatt doesn't understand him. He asked me if I loved him and I said that I love him. We then decided that because we could not put the bandaid on the inside that his bear could wear it for him. I explained the best I could to him that when other kids laugh or don't understand that he should not cry, but look at his bear and the bandaid and remember that people love him just the way he is.

Susan - posted on 10/04/2012

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thanks for sharing Marlena...it's not easy bring up children with autism...and they really are a gift...i have learned so much too...the love we have shared as a family is phenomenal...we are the lucky ones...

Marlena - posted on 10/03/2012

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My son is Autistic, brave, funny, great with patterns, fascinated by the beauty of machines and cars, in love with his teddy bear even though he is about to turn 6, afraid of change, easily attached to people he deems as "good", and very quirky. He is not and never has been mentally retarded. So what he can't say words correctly that begin with S or T. So what he will always call my neighbor Wendy, Wemby. Yeah I spend an extra half hour in the morning conforting him in the summer because he does not want to stop wearing long sleeves. To me and to those that understand his quirks, he is the most amazing child. I honestly have less problems in the day with him than I do with my 7 year old non spectrum child. The plus side is that I learn new things every day by looking at the world through his eyes. I don't really see that he has weaknesses, because I see his delays from autism as a gift. My son will stay a child longer. He is just like having a very quirky 3 year old, because god gave him a bigger box to play in. It is not always easy to deal with him, but when those little moments happen and he just smiles and buries his face in my shirt and walks with his head held high in confidence, I know I have done my job well.

Katherine - posted on 10/02/2012

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I have to agree with Susan here. We don't use that term anymore. It's special needs or developmentally disabled. ESPECIALLY when referring to someone with autism.

Susan - posted on 10/01/2012

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i can't believe that in this day and age that you would even consider the language of 'mr'....i think you should take a good look at the language you are using...and ask yourself, what purpose is this question even serving?...it just seems pointless to me...

we as parents need to set an example to children and other adults who do not know any better...please search within yourself to improve on the type of wording you use and, ask if it's even relevant....as people will be looking to you to educate them in a positive way...best of luck

Katlyn - posted on 09/24/2012

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Definitely not. My 14 year old is in International High School and is ridiculously smart, but in certain areas. Other things are quite challenging for him (almost all revolving around social issues or telling time). Intelligence is most definitely not at a deficit. In fact, I have a memory that's almost scary good. When I'm in doubt, I ask him. His is even better. Often they may present in this way because they are so busy trying to tune out all the information they absorb that neurotypicals can easily ignore. My son loves headphones! He said the only thing better would be if they blocked out ALL sound:)

Esther - posted on 09/03/2012

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NO!!! Anybody testing kids on the spectrum who aren't MR themselves should know that the problem isn't with the kids-- it's with the test! My son has had it a couple of times and it came back borderline... then, we had a psych with a little common test who did a emergent language version of the test and he is suddenly a genius. Communication skills are weak in most of our AS kids and it's not fair to them-- or honest-- to use a test that relies heavily on communication skills. While I don't know the particulars of your situation-- my son was bombing academics until we fought for and got technology for him to use in the classroom-- Personal FM (teacher talks in microphone/my son wears headphones) and a laptop for taking notes and doing assignments (lousy small motor made my son not want to even try handwriting notes... but with the laptop he's doing pretty well) Hang in there! Keep up the good fight...

Lori - posted on 08/31/2012

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They absolutely do not. The majority of children on the autism spectrum have average to above average intelligence. My oldest son with autism is above average, my second son with autism is currently testing in the average range, but was non compliant during testing. MR is not the same as autism, although it can be present in some kids with autism.

Renate - posted on 08/26/2012

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I don't believe so. Autism has a spectrum from autistic who appear to be in there own world to mild and can function independent. Severe autism can mimick m.r.

Cherish - posted on 08/25/2012

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most people with classic or severe autism DO have some degree of MR....

People with Aspergers do not.By definition, the diagnosis of Asperger's excludes mental retardation

PDD is harder because it is such a generic diagnoses.

Christal - posted on 08/25/2012

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Thanks for your info! My son is pddnos & adhd n he is soo smart.. I didnt think it was true cause most people i meet on the spectrum are super intelligent

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