Help! Asperger son hurting little sister

Jennifer - posted on 03/25/2010 ( 36 moms have responded )

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My son is 10 years old and he is hurting my daughter almost every day. I have not heard of many Aspies who are aggressive, but my son is the bully. I'm looking for others who have a similar experience.... or just some advice on what to try next.

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Sue - posted on 04/01/2010

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My Aspies son is now 14, never been medicated, and had aggression/violence issues. On occasion he still does but no longer towards people. He has actually matured into a wonderful 'man' who is becoming socially acceptable, gaining many friends, participating in extra curricular activities such as singing in public and the like... The reason for posting that stuff is to let you know that it DOES get better as they get older... This son and his older sister fought constantly...still do but to a much less degree...and it got bad. My son obviously is VERY attached to certain objects and items that he owns and therefore the threat of losing those assisted greatly. It was a time and case by case situation though and was never perfect. Sucks that there is no answer to all the prayers!!! But I just want you to know it DOES get better. I couldnt be prouder of the man my baby is becoming :) After the years of daily phone calls from the school, the suspensions for aggresion and foul language, the dramas.....he has finally started to mature. It will happen....

Abby - posted on 03/25/2010

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That is a tough situation. My two younger kids are like oil and water with a blow torch. How severe is the behavior? Depending on your definition of "hurting" and the severity, there would be a variety of options. My son has Asperger's and has been getting aggressive as well usually when he is tired, overstimulated, or hungry. When he is angry he may throw a fit or hit, but we are working with Applied Behavior Analysis right now to deal with my son. The biggest thing is trying to figure out why he is behaving that way first. Does he want attention? Is he overstimulated? Is he wanting control? In any case, when he hurts your daughter he needs to have a consequence and it may help to have something posted for that for a reminder. After he is calm then go over the situation and give a way to handle it. . My daughter, 12, is currently diagnosed with ADHD and mood disorder. She was so violent that she needed to be in a pediatric psych unit and have them work with her for a while. If you do not mind posting more information, there may be other solutions.

Rachel - posted on 04/02/2010

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I know its frustrating i go through a similar situation with my son who is 6. Time outs don't work for him he laughs at me. he listens to his father alot more for some reason and its not that i'm any easier on him than my husband is. my son really gets to me at times as well, times where i'd like to get out and not come back for awhile. but hang in there i wont' say it will get better cause i do not know. i keep thinking my son will get easier on the head. we have tried taking things away and that doesn't help either most times. like you he forgets shortly after he gets in trouble.

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Maggie - posted on 01/28/2012

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I see that this thread has reactivated. One of the main topics always has to do with whether or not to medicate. When you consider that some of this behavior could lead to very serious consequences and could lead to legal prosecution and your family being sued because you didn't do your due diligence, you might reconsider. Treating someone's brain chemical balance is really no different than treating someone for a chronic physical condition. You wouldn't deny your asthmatic kid his inhaler to help him breath, so you shouldn't deny him medication that can help him buy some time until he is able to control his impulsive behavior. Don't forget that while this is your child, one day he will be the size of a man and even you could be in danger - I know a woman whose autistic teenager attacked her and if her other son hadn't been home to call 911, she would be dead. This is not simple and there are no simple answers.

Kris - posted on 01/28/2012

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Not many kids with Aspies do that sort of thing. I would take him back to the paed and recheck into Aspies, he could have more of an autistic side then when first diagnosed.

My son has PDD and we were told tht it's closer to Aspies but still higher on up the Autism spectrum disorder list. we have seen the paed on several occassions over his bullying of his sister and he advises against medication as it will slow down other important areas of the childs development, esp when the child is very smart.

I have tried everything possible with my son and have found seperating and monitoring their play to be the most effective way of avoiding the aggressive mood swings. When My son gets aggressive its due to the way he presieves the things around him as he sees it completely different to us. I work with him and work hard and have taken him to early intervention classes and he has settled a little bit. When he is off the top I take him from the situation and place him in another area without the trigger to his aggression being around him and it makes a difference.

shopping centres are the worst so I just remove myself from the situation by taking him out of the store and now I am starting to shop on line to avoid the hassles and the triggers by having them delivered to my door instead of putting up with the fight from him. I hope that this year he will show a little more improvement as he starts school for the first time.

I know someone with a aspies child and she said that when she started him at school he became aggressive and she didn't know why, then one day she went up to the school and she witnessed her son being bullied at school and put a stop to it straight away and when it was apparent that was happening she kicked it in the butt by involving the school and his teachers and other parents she knew from the school and when it stopped she saw a huge drop in his aggression towards her, her hubby and his siblings. He still has the on and off little temper but no where as bad as what he was when he was getting bullied.

try getting the school involved in a talk, a incursion to help other children become aware of children like ours so they have a better understanding of what we go thru and all that. It might help. I have raised it with the school my son is going to attend for the first time this year and they are considering it.

Deborah - posted on 01/28/2012

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Sharlene Wills: Thank you for being oh so informative. So what if it is from 2010? This was on the feed so I posted something. I am sure you have better things to do than to insult people who are just trying to help.

Deborah - posted on 01/27/2012

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I don't like the idea of meds for kids (MAYBE natural herbal). My son is non-verbal and 8 yrs with Autism. If your child speaks you have an advantage over me :) This is what I'm doing with his agression: "Well, I have been trying to give my son a label for his emotions when he is feeling them (I can tell what he is feeling somewhat of course by his behavior and sounds). I started with 'mad' because this is the emotion most associated with the aggression. He has begun saying 'ma' for 'mad' as that is his level of speech-the first couple letters of words. I had to teach him the 'mmm' sound first with repitition. When he gets aggressive, I have been ignoring the slaps/kicks/aggressive behavior (distancing myself slightly if needed) with no eye contact and no reaction. I ask him 'are you mad?' with a calm quiet tone. Then I cue him by telling him 'say mad' (repeating it if I have to), when he tries I tell him 'good job saying mad'. Sometimes I don't need the cue, he will answer my question with 'ma!' now we need to take care of him yelling it out (leading by example). It didn't take long for him to realize that using his emotion words is a lot easier and more of a relief than hitting and kicking. If he is really upset, I try to redirect to another activity like a book or his fidget/sensory item after he says 'ma'. He sometimes finds the need to say it a few times so each time I tell him 'good job saying mad' and I try to remain as calm and quiet as I can, remembering emotions are transferable and that he has sound sensitivity. I have started with the next emotions-Sad and Happy-so that he might understand there is a difference between labels, there are many emotions and that all of them are ok to feel. This has been a learning opportunity for both of us. The aggression has minimized considerably, I am so proud of him! Although all kids with Autism are different, I wanted to share this because the more tools you have in your toolkit, the better chance you have of getting the job done."

Jerri - posted on 04/05/2010

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You might want to see if hes doctor can see if he might be going into puberty. That's what my 13 year old son did and still does. The doctor said he's going through a process that he doesn't understand why he feels certain ways. He was 10 years old when the doctors told me that. It's not going to be easy if he is. I have 3 girls and 1 boy that he does that to. I wish you luck ! ! ! !

Tracy - posted on 04/05/2010

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Hello Jennifer,

My son is 8 and has Autism not Aspergers, but being that they have some similarities with symptoms, it is possible that your son may be hurting his sister as a way of getting your attention because he feels ignored and does not want to share with her or she may have annoyed or agitated him in some way.

Loud noises and chaotic situations are a factor, but when something happens that is out of what they relate to as proper behavior or scary to them, they react first as a way of protecting themselves. Does your son talk well or not? Usually when a child with Autism or Aspergers is severe, not being able to communicate their wants and needs is apparent and when this is the case, they act out where they cannot express to you what may be bothering them and what they want and need from you to feel better. How old is your daughter? If she is old enough to understand, you may try talking to her about her brother and teach her how to act toward him in the future so that he does not feel intimidated by her and they can form a better bond as siblings. I had to do that with my two other children and now even though at times it is still difficult for them to play together, they know not to upset their brother cause they know how to read the signs to know when he is upset and back off, but they also are starting to grow closer and he no longer hits or bites them.

Gail - posted on 04/04/2010

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I forgot to tell you that there is some hope as they get older as my husband also has aspergers and his mother said as he got older his behaviour progressed to the point he was able to be taken of meds and knowing him today and compairing him to my son i would never of guessed he had aspergers so this gives me hope that my son will progress in the same way and i hope that all your children do also..
Most of you talk about having a son with aspergers my friend has a daughter with it and she has been told that it is rare in girls but when they have it their behaviour progresses alot faster and worse so your all lucky including me to have boys....

Breezie - posted on 04/03/2010

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My son is 11 and was diagnosed this past year. He is also very aggressive with his younger brother, who is 9. I have found that it is worse when he has had a rough day at school. He has punched his brother in the face, kicked him in the stomach, and attacked his face. His therapist and I have discussed trying him on some meds to help with his anxiety. It seems he is more violent when his anxiety levels are high. Have yet to get started on any, still waiting on an appt with psych. I try to keep them apart, or try to distract him from whatever may be bothering him, when I notice that he is having a bad day to keep him from lashing out at his brother. This can be very difficult at times. I wish you luck!

Kristin - posted on 04/03/2010

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our son has been put on risperidone and we seem to have a different child now. He still has violent outbursts but not as regularly as before, and is now more settled in school. Only sideaffect we have found is he gets tired after he has had his dose which is in the mornings - so he normally ends up having a sleep in the sick bay at school and then he is ready to face the day.

Kristin - posted on 04/03/2010

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Hi, I am in the same boat as you. Our 7yr old son has aspergers with aggression problems and it is usually his 9yr old sister or 3yr old brother that are on the receiving end of it. So no YOU ARE NOT ALONE there are others out there like me. so dont think its something you done cos thats how i used to feel but now i am not blaming myself anymore.

Dawn - posted on 04/03/2010

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try a counselor and respiridone meds from dr. and most aspies ae aggressive
momof 15 yr aspieDwn

Mary - posted on 04/03/2010

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OMG... this could be describing my son when he was 9 and my daughter was 7. He would become convinced she was looking at him funny or staring at him or be bothered by how she was eating and start hitting her. He thought she was doing things to purposefully bother him. My son was in a class for high functioning autism and all the other moms of kids in the class said their doctors were attributing sudden new aggression to hormones starting to kick in. All of these kids were starting to be put on meds with doctors saying things would only get worse as they became adolescents without meds. Since I have two brothers who were on meds since they were young, I tried to avoid that route. We went to a classical homeopath who specializes in autism and my son's behaviors stopped overnight with the remedy. In fact he moved out of the autism program and it hardly recognizable as the same child. I recommend you read Dana Ullman 's books on autism and ADHD and homeopathy first, so you get an idea of how it works. Or read Amy Lansky's book "The Impossible Cure." Then see a classical homeopath.

Gail - posted on 04/03/2010

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Just a few short lines to warn you that your son could have a reaction to Prozac if this is the first type of medication he has been on my son James was put on Prozac when he was 7yrs old and he had allutionations and swore black and blue that someone was in his room and was trying to climb the walls to get away from them, this was a very scary thing to see and even after we took him of Prozac my son's behaviour got worse due to this because he wouldn't sleep as he was scared the person would come back even though we told him they were gone for good.
My Psychologist at the time told us to persevere with it as it will settle down after 3 wks of this i'd had enough and seeked the advice of another Psychologist who told us to stop giving it to him as if we didn't we would be putting our son at risk of brain damage and even than he wasn't sure of how things would go with him as he had already been on it for 3wks with this reaction so please keep an eye on your son as i would hate anything else to go wrong for you and your family.
I'm sorry if i have scared you in anyway but i'm sure if someone had warned me my son would probably not have all his health problems that he has due to Prozac...

Jennifer - posted on 04/02/2010

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At least I don't feel alone anymore.. THANK you all for responding!!! A bit more information about our situation.... my 10 year old Aspie son is abusive to our 8 year old daughter. Like some of you, we have found that taking away privlidges has not really worked with our son. Reward systems have worked off and on but never very long or very consistently. It is almost like he forgets about what consequences he will recieve... his "currency" is video game time.... he does his chores every day to "earn" time on the computer, WII or DSI. We are seeing both a Psychologist and a Psychiatrist and we just put our son on Prozac yesterday. :( I really got to the point where we had to find another place for him to live or have him medicated.

Rachel - posted on 04/02/2010

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my son use to hurt his little sister to. he use to put a blanket over her face and slap her and that was just for no reason. we just sat him down and explained that she was to young to do that to her. we just explained that it would hurt her and said you don't want to hurt sissy do you? we just had to keep having talks with him about it and he got over it after awhile. what do you do when he does that. sometimes time outs are good cause he has to know he can not do that. but it does get better. how old is your son?

Gail - posted on 04/02/2010

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This is normal behaviour for a child with aspergers to forget what instructions you give him i would advise talking to your doctor/specialist about your options when it comes to medication and they might be able to refer you to other services that help with this situation as it will help you in the long run....

Abby - posted on 04/02/2010

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My 9 yr old son has aspergers, and recently he punched a classmate in the face and kicked him in the groin because he refused to return the other boy his book...should i put him on meds?

The school's special needs officer tells me to talk to him nicely, to keep reminding him on what is unacceptable behavior, but he is impulsive and simply forgets whatever instructions we give him...

Gail - posted on 04/02/2010

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I have a 14yr old with Aspergers and he was aggressively violent and would also hurt his older sister and lose control that i would have to jump in and cop the beating instead of her.
I tried locking him in his room but he would bang on the door until i let him out or climb out the window and enter through the back door just to get at us, His father tried to punish him by not allowing him to play his playstation but all he would do is shrug his shoulders and continue to play the playstation and just laugh at us and if you tried to take it of him he would kick and scream at us.

This happened up until he was 13 when his specialist changed his medication from Ritalin to Concerta and his aggressive behaviour isn't as bad anymore, meaning he will throw things around in his room or outside instead of bullying/bashing us up which isn't much better but at least were not the punching bag anymore.

You didn't say how old your daughter is but try giving your daughter some information about your son's dissability as this also helped my daughter understand where he was coming from and how he would might think and why he behaved the way he did.

Another thing is your daughter stirring him up in anyway like picking on him or complaining about the way he behaves as this is what my daughter use to do and that would start him off in one of his rages, i would find out if this is happening as if you can stop it from happening she mighten get hurt anymore.

I hope i have helped you some way even if it was just letting you know that your not alone with this sort of behaviour....

[deleted account]

Hi Jennifer, it is a great task to keep any child under control with their behaviour and i'm sure that you are feeling as though your hitting brick walls but there is a light at the end of the tunnel if you have the right support & patience to get through the process...
My son has recently turned 16 & was very aggressive towards animals & becomes aggitated with noises that hurt his ears or simply irritate him such as chewing.
Over time we have learnt to work around the things that trigger his aggression by doing those things seperately while teaching my son to be more tolerant of others with consequences for his behaviour. when i say consequences i'm talking about him being sent to his room for quiet time so that he recognises that he is angry & needs time out & something that he really wants to get being put on hold until he behaves... taking something that your son is looking forwatrd to away means that he has to work harder because it's something he is obsessing about & wanting rather than something he already has & knows he will get back eventually.
I am happy to say that after all of the screaming matches & consequences my son has grown up to ask first, take time out when he is angry & to understand that other people have issues too.
I wonder how your daughters self esteem is with her brother hurting her all of the time & if she understands that he has triggers for her to work around & understand that they need to be respectful of each other by working around each irritation ?
sometimes it's just a matter of explaining why things happen & how to get along ... maybe a designated space for your daughter to escape from your son in the house or yard where he is banned from entering will help your daughter ? a safe place to call her own ?

best wishes and know that you aren't fighting a losing battle :)

Penny - posted on 04/01/2010

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I am divorced and my ex has custody of my children. He is in denial about my son't behavior (ADHD and ausp). He says he only acts out in my home and never in his home. I think he's lying to me. He took him off his meds and then accused me of wanting to keep him drugged. He says his behavior is just normal kids' behavior. No it is not. His behavior is exactly like everyone else's behavior described here. I think my ex is doing my son more harm than good through his denial. I am desperate to help my son.

My ex won't read any books, nothing. He said he hired my son's therapist to give him all the info he needs. How much info can he possibly get in five minutes twice per month? He isn't even consistent with my son's appointments.

How the hell did he end up with sole custody is beyond my comprehension. He is hurting our chilid. I am desperate for an intervention to wake him up and to give my son the chance of a happy childhood-the chance all children deserve. Before anyone asks, he's 8 and he was diagnosed at 5. Behaviors emerged at two when he would hit and bite himself and occasionally hit his head in the wall. According to my ex it never happened because he never saw it.

Help me, more importantly, help my precious Elliot, please.

Tracy - posted on 04/01/2010

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Wow, your son sounds a lot like my daughter! My daughter is almost 8 and is physically aggressive to her younger sister (age 5) who is loud and loves to sing. They ride the school bus together and now have to sit three rows apart due to the issues on the bus. We also have separate meal times due to her sensitivities to chewing noises. This has saved us on a lot of stress. Her behavior in school has improved quite a bit this past year. They did an FBA (functional behavior assessment) and did not find any incidents when she was observed so their response was to do nothing. I requested an independent assessment (IEE) at the school districts expense and won it. The new assessment is now pending. I am hoping for some good information and advice from the new Behaviorist. How is your son's behavior in school? Does he have an IEP? I ask you these questions because you may be able to go down the same road that I did and request an FBA from the school district (and if you don't agree with it then you can request an IEE - also at their expense). Currently, their are consequences for my daughter if she is physically aggressive and I make a big deal when she does choose to use her words or walk away. Another option is to seek a therapist who works with ASD kids. I may consider that option if things don't improve. I hope that this helps.

Tracy

Sarah - posted on 04/01/2010

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my son dose the same thing i just found out last year he has asperger syndrome he is very aggressive to everyone including me he sees 4 theriphist

LISA - posted on 04/01/2010

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Jennifer, my 9 year old son is exactly the same with his 5 year old sister. She has got to the stage that she is frightened to be left by herself and follows me everywhere. My son does it as he knows it is the only behaviour I can't ignore. I have a star chart for him which he gets stars for being nice to his sister along with other challenging behaviours. It is very frustrating and not fair on their siblings but they don't do it to deliberately hurt they do it because they want a reaction and don't understand.

Maggie - posted on 03/31/2010

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When my son was 10 he was put on paxil for a couple of years to "lengthen his fuse" It helped. He learned to manage his impulsive behavior during that time and didn't need any further medication. During that time, he always had to apologize for his behavior whenever he acted out - he hated that. ie. "I am sorry that I hit you - I shouldn't have done that, I should have controlled my temper. I am sorry that you got hurt" - then they have to shake hands My son is 20 yrs old now, a high school graduate, working part time and attending college full time. - You have to learn how to explain to your son that he is not ever allowed to hit or injure his sister - ever, even if she is the antagonist (you might want to watch to see if she provokes him on purpose). Remember you have to explain to him things that regular folks know by the time they are 10. You can forget trying the empathy approach - in the moment, that won't make a difference. If he thinks somewhat logically, make sure he can connect the consequences to the behavior - "if you don't hit your sister, then your won't have to apologize to her" Good luck, and stand firm.

Kim - posted on 03/31/2010

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Hi Angela, Yes, I agree Abilify helps but, in our case he reacted. But, my son is also mentally ill. But, the med we are currently on is Zyprexia. But, now my youngest daughter who does not have aspergers but, is cognitively delayed, mood disorders, and brain damage responds to Abilify. She is very difficult to work with In fact her two natural siblings also are on abilify. Although their problems are different they all three have a (what I call) a HUGE stubborn streak. Without the med Abilify they would not school or listen at all. But, interesting as it sounds they are physically not related to my aspergers son (they are all my adopted children) but, show signs of aspergers but, have yet to be diagnose with aspergers. As for respite help, we don't qualify for any from our county. I am forced to accept help from family and friends only. We struggled to get help for my aspergers/mentally son recently and the only way we did is I had to accused him in court and file charges against him of trying to hurt myself. Otherwise, he would be struggling still as we speak with delusions only treated by outpatient treatment every three months only. Mostly, because he wasn't suicidal or violent enough towards others.(We spent the last three years dealing with it at home.) Best thing I could have done for him. He is great, now! But, we both have scars on our hearts & souls how we had to go about his hospitalization. The rest of the family too. Although, my son NEVER broke laws or was responsible for his actions he was treated like a criminal in order to get treatment. Even going so far as they handcuffed him everytime we came to court and transported him by police car despite the fact that he never fought them or gave them any trouble. He just wanted to feel better and come home. Our system here needs lots of work. Needless to say if my husband and I had more money we could get better treatment. But, we don't. He is a hardworking blue collar worker who never got a chance to go to college. I never got to go back to school because after our first son was born with cystic fibrosis, well let's just say he needed me. We wanted more children but, because of our genetics we choose fostercare and eventually adoption. I cannot say I'm sorry. I love ALL my kids and am very grateful for them! As my husband is. But, it is so frustrating and a constant battle to fight for what they deserve...good healthcare. Has anyone notice how similar aspergers is compared to certain mental illness issues? Or is it just my kids because of seperate issues?

Angela - posted on 03/31/2010

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Our experience was that after being bullied for quite some time our son also became the bully at times. We used many therapy approaches, behavior therapy, anger management, something with the thermometer (can't remember the name) and also something called PMT - psychomotor training (adapted specifically for aspies with aggression). All of the methods we tried had some advantages and our son learned some new skills. Our son cannot role play, but he can discuss hypothetical situations, so we have these "what if" scenario's often for discussion.

Recently our son started a new medication called Abilify. It's an anti-psychotic (similar to risperdal but with fewer side effects) and recent studies show a positive outcome with Aspergers kids. It seems to be a mood stabilizer and our now 12 year old is less affected by his hyper-sensitivities (like the sound of chewing) than ever before! He's having fewer meltdowns or triggers and for us the results at this stage are positive.

You are not alone, and what you're going through isn't easy. I would also recommend a sibling class for your daughter if they are available in your area. Her understanding of her brother's triggers and condition might help her in many ways. Also what Kim says is good - our son is better motivated by a reward system. He earns computer time, wii time (find your son's currency) by adhering to the house rules. Break it down in small achievable increments, eg: one hour with no tripping, hitting or pushing = 10 minutes computer time. Maybe do it per half hour - you know your son and can find out what is meaningful to him. Our son gives up entirely if he sees a punishment by something being taken away, he can't get motivated for the next half hour or hour to use good behavior, so this method of always earning a privilege works for him. Sometimes we have to change it up with different rewards and such, be creative and keep reaching out like you are for new ideas.

Kim - I recently hired a home helper to come in a couple hours for 2-3 days a week. Tough transition, but the best thing I did, I recharge my batteries, take time for self care. I'm in the Netherlands, so the disability benefits may be different here, but after some hard work and juggling, we found a way to do this, and it's great. Maybe works in the states somehow?

Kim - posted on 03/30/2010

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This may seem harsh but, do you give your son a consequence for his bad behavior? As hard as it is all children need to know limits. Even special needs children. I have six special needs children, and I have always been strick on what is allowed and not allowed. When my children did and do something I find unacceptable I respond immediately with a consequence. It takes time and lots of hardwork but, friends and family are almost always impressed by my kids being able to behave despite several special needs and personalities. (Five of my children are adopted.) The hardest part is balancing consequences with rewards for good behavior. Both are very important to make a solid change in behavior. Sometimes, children want attention and will do unacceptable things to get attention. Especially, with children with special needs. They don't have patience to wait. Jealousy is something I see in our home quite often. I spend alot of time talking and trying to explain things even if they do not always seem to get it. Sometimes, children with autism understand even if they cannot express this to show us. Being a mom can be very exhausting but, being a mom with special needs can can be even more exhausting. Does anyone have a cure for the exhausted way we all go to bed at night??? Hope this helps!

Jennifer - posted on 03/30/2010

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Thanks so much for responding! Here is additional info to clarify our situation.... my daughter is 8.. and in most cases her brother is tripping, pushing or hitting her.. he has also stepped on her and puts her down any chance he gets. He has a sensitivity to seeing or hearing people eat. We've been trying to get her to chew correctly but it is impossible! We now eat our meals separately... don't eat in the car.. and try to keep them apart as much as possible.

Kim - posted on 03/26/2010

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Hi, don't know if this helps but, my son gets more aggressive when he is feeling unhappy or ignore. My son is sixteen and he has another more severe problem unrelated to his aspergers. But, is normally a big teddy bear unless feeling depressed. My son's depression really became noticable at about that age. Hope it helps!

Angie - posted on 03/26/2010

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My son also was dx with mood disorder and adhd....he was unable to understand conseqences or boundries....before the right meds, so IDK that that will help.and what the psych. unit told un intervension is the key, if you can ward of the behavior before it starts that the children shouldnt be left to play alone..which IDK how that would be possible to be rifht there every second I cant imagine...

Angie - posted on 03/26/2010

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OH yes my son was when he was on the wrong meds..verry aggressive.he was on meds for adhd Focalin and then also depression Prozak and then also took Singulair for asthma....he was then hospitalized for three weeks..Psyciatrist said that those combos of meds generally casue aggression..and once detoxed they discovered the Aspergers....so now he is on the right combo and is not even angry all the time let alone aggressive. So I would say to you, look into the meds your son is on. Ad good luck it is all very hard, but its alot easier once they are on the right meds.

[deleted account]

Hi Jennifer: How old is your daughter? My son used to have aggression issues, but it was when he was in a summer preschool/daycare environment that was loud and chaotic. He is now 6, and occasionally gets aggressive with his sister (she's 10) or a child at school, but usually only when things around him are too loud, chaotic, or if he perceives that he's being picked on.

Just wondering what the situation is and when he hurts her. That might help to troubleshoot the issue.

Mom of Aspie son.

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