Hey to all

Teresa - posted on 09/29/2009 ( 7 moms have responded )

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In not real new to the site, but I just wanted to say Hi and maybe a good story about your child. Thanks

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Brianna - posted on 10/02/2009

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I dont have any advice as such that may help though with my son in the last term I think to some degree it has helped for him to know which section of the playground he is expected to be eg sandpit, new play ground or latherant at his school and the children he has a particular problem with in the playground is sent to a different area until we can inprove on his socalization difficulties

Candace - posted on 09/30/2009

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My son started middle school this September. What an adventure he is to raise! I have a story like most. At about the age two he quit talking and had trouble walking. Unfortunetly, I had a terrible Dr. who told me he was a "boy" and not to worry until his 3 year old check up. My husband and I were convinced we didn't know how to parent. None of our other friends with 2 year olds had taken their doors off the hindges to prevent their child from banging his head into it. We signed up for parenting classes which turned into the best thing that could have happend for our son and us.



At age 3, we took him to the school district for help. They told us he was possibly hearing impaired and ADHD. I knew Andrew wasn't hearing impaired.I went home clapped next to his ear and he turned and looked right at me. Andrew was my first child and I believed everyone really wanted to help my son.



Luckily work took me to NC. I took him to enroll for school (kindergarden) and within 2 weeks the school had him at a pedicatric neurologist and diagnosed. By second grade my son was speaking again, walking, reading, writing and even bouncing a basketball. I really loathed living in NC. I missed my family, but had we not moved for those brief 2 years who knows what would have happened.



Andrew,12 now, is learning to play the French horn. He loves it and it's the first time he's wanted to be apart of a group activity. He is at grade level in school and above grade level in math. Andrew is a blessing and gives me the least grief out of all the kids. He always takes his showers, brushes his teeth, puts his dishes up etc. He follows rules which adults are in awe of while kids tend to think he's odd. He volunteered with me at a food pantry all summer and I could go on and on. Early treatment is key to treating an autistic child.



Andrew, also took part in a Neuro feedback program and gave me my first real hug instead of a head but a year ago.



For all parents with young children and frustrated, it gets easier! Hang in there. My son isn't stared at when I take him places nor does he display self injury behaviors any longer. A true blessing he is!

Teresa - posted on 09/30/2009

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My son is one of the smartest boys you will ever meet. Michael was around 2ish when we were told he had aspergers. After a vacination all communication stopped. No mama, dada, nothing. he began hitting his head off the wall and rock back and forth. He old Dr said "he would stop when he hurt himself" but he didn't. I then went to a GREAT Dr. that told me if I treated him like he had a "handicap" he would milk it. I thank that Dr everytime I read stories that aren't so good. I have a feeling that he has some ADHD things too but not told by a DR yet. (have since moved and have to find a different great DR)



I also think that the special school he went to from 2-5 help him so much. In a little town in Ohio, Hopewell school. Amazing ppl and amazing work they do. My son still has problems but I wouldnt trade it for the world. He doesn't have to be medicated and I thank God for that. Michael will hopefully be doing a spelling bee this month and is it sad he can spell better than his mommy. lol



Everyone who has a child with a special need, may God Bless you and I pray that He is with you and your child. Hope the good stories keep coming. Its a blessing to read.

Lisa - posted on 09/30/2009

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These stories are very familiar and great job on giving your special kiddos what they need to succeed. My daughter is 5 and was diagnosed ASD at 2 1/2 and last year that was changed to PDD-NOS. We too did 2 pre-schools last year and she has made remarkable progress! My suggesting for the playground would be to ask the teachers to put a little more structure to their playground time than they usually do for kids. Perhaps he can have a specific game (nothing fancy catch, sidewalk chalk, play equipment time) to do each day. If they had a picture schedule for him then he could even pick which task he would like to do. Perhaps other children can be involved if he is open to that or maybe that is something that you can build into. Our children are proof that early intervention is the key in treating Autism!

Shasta - posted on 09/30/2009

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It seems the playground is a common place to have issues for these little ones. anybody got an idea how to make it easier for them there?

Debi - posted on 09/29/2009

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Hi there! I am new to this site and am finding myself inspired! My 4 year old son was diagnosed with PDD-NOS when he was 2 1/2 years old. Through much speech and occupational therapy, he has made incredible progress. He is enrolled in the special education PreK at his school as well as at a private PreK to give him more exposure to the social communication component. Fortunately he is doing very well in the structured classroom.....it's on the playground that he has his challenges. Unfamiliar and unstructured events and environments present him with his biggest challenges, but we're working on that. Every day I wake up thinking how blessed I am have such a loving, intelligent son.....I see nothing but hope in his future!

Shasta - posted on 09/29/2009

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Hi! My middle son has PDD-NOS. He started Kindergarten this year and my husband and I were so worried because this would be the largest school he's ever faced and his first time eating in a school cafateria. We were afraid he would have lots of meltdowns. We met with his teachers before the school year and gave them a list I had printed of all of his triggers and some ideas on how to avoid or minimize a melt down. And while he has to sit away from the bulk of his class in the cafateria and at circle time, and has had a few other issues the teachers were expecting them and new what to do to help. He has blossomed! He has even tried a few new foods at school with the encouragment of his teachers. While he still spends his recess picking up acorns to bring home instead of trying to play with other kids, he has done remarkable! I felt like sharing that in case anyone needed a little encouraging. :)

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