how do kids with autism act around other children? do they get excited ever?

Linda - posted on 08/19/2010 ( 39 moms have responded )

28

1

2

my daughter is an only child and im a first time mum and my daughter doesnt point yet or clap , she says mum , dad , no , ba-which means bath , ta- thankyou , she spins the wheels on her toys , not obsessively , she might go up to the toy spin the wheel a couple of times then play with the toy or move on to another toy , shes 13 months old, shes walking , getting into everything , she eats anything and doesnt care if i change her routine , but i think shes autistic because her eye contact is not the best and although she reaches for stuff she wants she doesnt point. she doesnt spend much time around kids but shes happy when i take her to her cousins school to pick her up , she gets excited seeing the other kids and she approaches these kids.so thats why im asking , if she gets excited when other kids are around, is this something an autistic toddler would do?

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Vicky - posted on 12/08/2012

1

0

0

I have a 12 year old boy that was just diagnosed with autism last year. The specialist at the university said that he is considered to be a child with minor autism. I have known children that have autism that would be considered much more severe but none the less i am worried sick about him. He has very little desire to interact with other children or adults and struggles with engaging conversation. He is very comforitable at home with his own family but that is about it. He does well with accepting his role as a student even though he struggles and also is very good at home about doing his household chores. A few years ago my older son turned him on to xbox games, wich at first he shopwed little interes for but as time has gone by it would seem that this is all he wants to do.I moniter this to about 2 hours a day but i am feeling like its probubly to much.When he is told its time to get off,he gets upset like most children would but he gets off anyway. I have tried soooo many times to introduce new things to him. I try to get him interested in toys that are age appropriate, books,new friends and he has no interest in any of it. I have tried grounding him from the few things he does enjoy with the hope he will then try new thing but of these past years it has not worked either.I feel like my parenting of him is not what it should be, that i am letting him down i guess because i cant find things that interest him like the other kids his age.Is there anyone out there that can offer me some advice about how i can get him to want to try new things and enjoy the outdoors and friendship of other children? I just want him to be happy and i keep thinking that it cant be possible that keeping himself so secluded can make him happy.He is a very kind hearted,well adjusted kid and im proud of the person he is but i would just like to find a way to get him more involved with other things

Grace - posted on 08/22/2010

2

9

0

I'm not sure of everything but my son is autistic high functioning. My son didn't speak until he was four years old he was very distant from other children he also had his own imaginary world. He didn't like to be touched much. He also did have the problem with eye contact which he still does till this day.He couldn't deal with change he doesn't like change if his food touched he could handle it.I'm not sure what other autistic moms have seen with their children but my son at that age did not like other children too much. i'm not sure if this helps u at all.

Mary - posted on 08/22/2010

100

12

12

My Autistic son LOVES everyone. he doesn't need to even know you and he will hug you and go anywhere with you. He tells everyone he loves them and will mis them when they are leaving. He does not like all children though, he's perticular on which kids he will play with or let into his world. He does go into his own world sometimes and its hard to reach him. He will start laughing and its like he's not on the same plane as we are. He is usually very happy, unless things change unexpectantly. He's not really predictable where his attition and focuse are concerned. Sometimes he's obsesed with lines, dirt on him, food, and order.

Sarah - posted on 08/31/2010

49

22

8

Speaking from personal experience, with my son being on the spectrum. Right from very young, he could care less if anyone were in the room with him or not, including myself. In fact, even now he tries to avoid people, especially peers!

Samantha - posted on 08/25/2010

1

1

0

Hi,
I have twins that were 8 last month and one of them is autistic. When they started pre-prep the nursery were worried about the non-autistic one as he didn't use eye contact but this was purely due to not 'learning' this from his brother, which was soon rectified. I think toddlers are excited at new things anyway so this isn't necessarily an autistic trait. I had my son diagnised at a very early age due to a separate congenital issue, and I used a system called Portage which I found very helpful. I hope this helps you.....Good luck and God bless :-)

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

39 Comments

View replies by

Joni - posted on 03/11/2013

85

0

1

When ever any mother are in doubt I always say go to early intervention. My sons dr told me he was fine @ 15 months when I noticed something wasn't right and @ 18 months he told me again he was fine. @ 2 I decided to take him to another dr and she told me she was seeing signs of autism. Told me to contact early intervention to get an assesment. I did and they told me not in so many words that she thought he had autism finally 6 months later got him an appointment @ childrens and he was diagnosed with mild/moderate autism. Dr are not always right.

Sowmiya - posted on 03/11/2013

1

0

0

hai ..dis is sowmiya
my son is now 2.2, bt his eye contact is very poor..he wont make for 2 sec.he is not demanding for feed also..he would like to play with elders..he dont knw how to play with his age...bt making fraction of sec eye contact with strangers call his name..he is pointing things and saying ca..ca...bt speaks only ten words like appa, mama...likes singing,books,,,but he is not searching his dad tooo,,but as when he entered home he responds with smile..i m very much depressed and feel like dying,he is d first kid to me,, please help me ...

Joni - posted on 12/17/2012

85

0

1

I have a 2 1/2 yr old that was just diagnosed. If that's the only thing is not very good eye contact I wouldn't worry too much. Just watch her close as long as she's not loosing milestones I think she is ok. She's 13 months and curious she don't have time to stop and look at you. Lol.

SHUCHITA - posted on 11/29/2012

1

0

0

See a naturopath too, if possible. Watch her diet and avoid junk food. Try GFCF diet and see if her eye-contact improves.

Shelly - posted on 08/31/2010

44

16

7

Every child is different, but most kids with autism that I know personally, that I played with, and as a small child myself, I wasn't all that excited to see other kids. They were usually mean to me. I preferred my own company.

Shawnna - posted on 08/30/2010

4

2

0

I have a 3 year old son who has been diagnosed with sensory integration problems.His therapist doesnt want to "put a label" on him. I am wondering if anyone else has issues with violent outburst to self and others.my son constantly bites his hand and repeatedly says dubaduba..... when around other children,he prefers to be by himself and when there is contact with other children its usually violent.He doesnt like anything cold(potato salad,cold fruits etc...)He seems to be getting worse the older hes getting.IK would welcome anyfeedback.You can e-mail me at agatestephen@yahoo.com

Madeline - posted on 08/28/2010

25

42

0

They're all so very different it's difficult to say and girls often 'present' differently from autistic boys [I have two autistic boys] and over the years we've met a lot of autistic girls both at therapy and school.

Janine - posted on 08/27/2010

1

8

0

I really think its too early to tell.
My eldest son (10) has autism and I have another 3 younger children. I was worried about my youngest (2 1/2) when he was around 12+ months b/c I noticed that he couldn't point, and b/c we already have 1 child with autism it freaked me out. I can't actually remember the age he was when he finally did (was a big relief) but 12 months on and he is the most advanced child we have - very social, chatterbox, normal behaviour, intelligent, good eye contact and appears to be fine..
In regards to my eldest son's development , he reached his milestones on time, although a little slow with walking 16 months, but his eye contact was always very sporadic, he played on his own, quite aloof, and his speech didn't advance from 12 months on. He then started behaving oddly - repetitve, ritualistic behaviour, toe walking, hand flapping, tantrums when routines were changed, spinning his toys etc.. All of this started around 18months (that's when people pointed it out to us, we were oblivious so it may have been going on for a while). As a baby it was always difficult to get his eye contact in photos, and at one stage we thought he was deaf b/c he wouldn't respond to his name when he was engaged in something else (unable to integrate his senses). It was a difficult road, and still is.
In regards to social interaction with others, generally they struggle with socialising. My son played well with his cousins,and those he knew well but it was always in physical games (chasey, at the park, on the trampoline etc.. but really struggled to play with others (he still doesn't understand the concept of play and how to initiate it).
Good luck and try not to stress. She is only 13 months old and they can vary in their development just like my youngest sons case.
.

Kathleen - posted on 08/26/2010

2

6

0

Sadly, there's no set rules for how an autistic child will respond or react to stimulus - each child is so very dif. that's why the symbol for autism is a puzzle piece with varied colors and pattern. Our son now 17 did not make eye contact as a toddler and really didn't like to be held for extended periods of time - he was content to play alone and didn't interact with other children while playing other than to show them what he was doing. Most autistic kids don't like change in routine but that's not easily determined at such a young age. If you're very concerned that she may have autism I would consult a specialist in that field. If nothing else it will give you peace of mind and put you on the right track for raising your precious one.

Deanna - posted on 08/25/2010

1

1

0

Hi: My son was diagnosed with a mild case of autism when he was 2 years old. He is now 5 and is in an autism program "Kindergarten". My son sounds just like your daughter when he was that age. When I went in for his 2 year check the doctor asked me if he was saying 50 words or more...No he was not, he did not have great eye contact, but he was as sweet as could be, he played with his toys like any other kid and loved being around other children and hugging & kissing is his fave past time. I was in shock when they told me he had Autism...A little in denial as well. The good thing is that they started sending "Teachers" to our house to work with him untill he was 3 years old and he was able to go into an autistic pre-school. Now that he is 5 he goes to our local public school and is doing great, the teacher is even saying that he may be able to go "Main Stream" sometime this year. We still work on making eye contact when we speak. We have been evaluated by speach therapist and they do not see autism but a speach delay. He has always followed directions even at 2 years old...Pick up your toys, put that in the hamper, bring me your plate... He could never respond verbaly, but he understood everything. Within the last 3 years we have had tubes put in his ears (Helped his speach a lot) and just 2 months ago he had his tonsils & adenoids removed and now its like he is a new kid. getting good sleep and he is able to focus so much better.....My advice is to have her chacked out by the doctor, no matter how hard it is take what ever diagnosis she is given and get the help now. The extra schooling will only help her and as she gets bigger you can always have her re-evaluated. Like I said I think my son has a speach delay (Not autism) but the schooling has helped and he is doing great. All free of charge...We get services through Valley Mountain Reginal Center in Ca. you can always go directly to them and have her evaluated, you dont have to have a doctors referal.
Good Luck.

Rita_2_davey - posted on 08/24/2010

105

50

10

I dont' think you have anything to worry about. Autistic children normally babble, they don't understand when you say something to them, its like their in their own little world. She is doing everything any normal child of her age does. When around other children yes she gets excited because shes' happy to be around others'. Her appetite is good, children her age dont' really understand routine, other than naps, or bedtime, bathtime (but not always). I think you have a very happy child. If later on she shows' signs of attention span, change in routine etc. then I would think you should have her checked but right now feel at ease.As for eye contact she could just be interested in something else. Their attention span at this age doesn't last long, they want to move on to something else. Dont' worry mom, take care.

Cynthia - posted on 08/24/2010

10

10

0

Give her some time .... Read up on autism in the library. Sometimes Autistic child dont like being arround children and loud noises. they get scared very easidly in there serrounding but there very smart children . I have one . he is thirteen years old . I had to educated myself first on every disability out there. There many levels of austism and its not too hard to diagnose. let her play enjoy the children arround her. its good for her / him to interact and have that social interation with others but if you see your child clapping like a ticking motion flapping her hands speradicly and woundering eyes. walking on her tip toes. etc. then it could be.But look at the web site www.Austism.com read up on it and see. and check with your dr first too. I hope this helps God Bless

Kelly - posted on 08/23/2010

12

17

0

When you say your daughter lined things up, you mean she placed her toys in a line obsessively. My son has always done that and he doesn't like to play with or even interact with other kids. He will occasionally, though he usually remains standoffish.

Connie - posted on 08/23/2010

66

45

8

I would say the if she has Autism it might be a very mild case! But you should have her checked by her doctor and maybe some other follow up testing, my son who is now 10 yrs old has PDD-NOS which is a mild form of Austim but he does not react to other people when they come around at first and he usually doesn't even notice his friends if they walk by if they say hi unless I tell him but that is just him I suppose but that is also the Austim coming out also.

Linda - posted on 08/23/2010

32

18

1

I would mention your concerns to the peditrician and then contact Early Intervention in your state. 13 months is awfully young for an autism diagnosis, but at least this way you can get her in the system and be tested for other delays. Keep an eye on her speech development. My Andrew has Asperger's Syndrome and he actually was the first to talk. Da-Da, Ma-Ma, then that's as far as it went. By 2, my daughter (his twin) was delivering the news and he was saying 10 words. Early help is the key. Early Intervention is a federal program that may help you.

Amey - posted on 08/23/2010

1

16

0

my brother has autisum and as he is getting older he getting more aware but not much. my family are very sensitive about the subject and try to do as much as they can for the children they are all volenteers in a charity cally daisychain and its for autistic children and also for the brothers and sisters its brilliant will post the website and i would advise everyone to have a look as it is brilliant for the children. it is like the bible to my family x

Brenda - posted on 08/22/2010

5

14

1

Dear Linda,
Everyone has made some good points! I am a paraeducator who has work with 3 very different Autistic children. My best advice is to seek help from a trusted Medical Doctor. The earlier you detect any kind of condition or special ability the better for the child and yourself. It has been proven in lots of different cases that the earlier you know what you are dealing with the sooner you can improve the condition. I am also a mother of 4 very different children one which is ADHD. All kids act different and grow at different speeds! So don't worry and just seek out the best Doctor for what you might think is going on with your wonderful healthy child!

Kelly - posted on 08/22/2010

12

17

0

My son also has issues with eye contact and isn't very social. We really didn't start noticing too much until he refused to interact with the other kids, he absolutely has no desire to play with kids his age, and it wouldn't bother him if he never had to play with any children.

Kelly - posted on 08/22/2010

12

17

0

Thanks, I appreciate the support. We hope to find out soon, but if it takes a while oh well. We love him just how he is!

Sandra - posted on 08/22/2010

19

5

0

I have 2 boys..One boy is 4 and is on the autism spectrum and a 19 month old typical boy..My older one still will not play with or acknowledge his brother unless I engage him..My younger one talks and loves to be around everyone..If I would have had him first ,I would have had my autistic son diagnosed much earlier than 2 and a half..Definitely talk to your pediatrician and call early intervention for an evaluation..Hope this helps..

[deleted account]

I think that you are worrying about your child being autistic a little to early if eye contact is her only problem. and as a mother of three and an autistic child you might want to join some kind of play group so she can spend time around other children b4 u decide she has a developmental issue

Nancy - posted on 08/22/2010

4

12

1

Hello, I'm the mom of an Autistic child (officially diagnosed since 2). The only thing I can tell you is that although there are certain things that all Austistic children do, there are also differences. My son is high functioning and is a sensory crasher. I'm always told that he doesn't look like an Autistic child (as if there was a particular look). Most of the information out there is limited (i.e. Autistic children don't like to be touched, they never speak, etc). First things first, talk to your child's doctor. Then, if need be, get your child evaluated. There is no sense in driving yourself crazy and guessing that something is wrong. As moms, we have enough worries.

Kelly - posted on 08/22/2010

12

17

0

In most of the research I've done they will tell you that most autistic kids lack emotion, although my son hasn't been diagnosed yet I feel he too has some form of autism. He shows emotion with us, just not too much with strangers.

Susan - posted on 08/22/2010

8

14

0

Well, my 6 yr. old son has PDD-NOS (one of the 5 under the Autistic Spectrum) and he is always very excited (always has been) to see other kids. He just doesn't always understand appropriate ways of communicating with them.

Deana - posted on 08/22/2010

5

30

0

my 2 year old grandson has autism and my kids tell me that there are days that he is in his own little world and will not talk to anyone. then his therapist comes and he will not talk to her but when she asks him if he is going to sign he will break out in some awesome sign language. he loves to play with his siblings and he does get excited.

Christi - posted on 08/22/2010

1,038

34

74

i would talk to her doctors, but at first thought, she doesn't sound autistic. my son does the opposite of everything you say your daughter does and won't play with children. we can't even take him to restaurants because they are too overwhelming for him. my son is 20 months and the earliest you can get them diagnosed is 18 months. but if she is talking and doing all you say she is, i wouldn't be worried.

Abigayle - posted on 08/22/2010

54

82

1

My god son, his sister my god daughter have Asperger's Syndrome on the Autism spectrum and my son has High Functioning Autism with Sensory Integeration Disorder. They all also have OCD and ADHD. They mostly co-play tend to be talking to imaginary super heros. They do tend to fight more and are super sensitive. They make up quickly. They hate sharing their special toys or something they happen to have an attatchment to that week. A fit can come on if one knocks something over like a tower of their blocks. I found the WII has helped for the most part but my son is really good and if they aren't good he gets really pissed off when they mess up but I just stay close by and talk him down like I learned to do this past year.

Karen - posted on 08/21/2010

1

22

0

Hi, I am a pediatric occupational therapist who has specialized in ASD kiddo's for many years now. First, if you do have concerns, you may want to run them by you MD. Given that, what you have described is a typically healthy thriving toddler. It sounds like she is indicating her needs by taking you to things (you may want to check via simple games if she is able to isolate her index finger for pointing-as that would be a fine motor concern). Her play sounds like it is flexible and she is not getting "stuck" in spinning things, lining things up etc. That type of play that becomes dominated by "visually stimming" and becoming stuck in creating order may be a marker for ASD (but also sometimes children have difficulty with play ideas, which may be a marker with something called praxis. Difficulties with praxis often affect children with ASD, but also children with sensory processing disorder without ASD). If this is occurring modeling by a parent, sibling or peer helps a child "learn" ideas in play.

With regard to the question of getting excited..., remember, typically developing kiddo's get excited seeing friends, family etc. This is a wonderful expression of emotion. If she is not engaging with them after the "excitement" phase, she may be sensitive to being around that much stimulation which may again be a behavior related to sensory integration versus a neurodevelopmental issue, or simply shy! Eye contact also may be exhibited with ADS kids, children who have sensory integration issues and are sensitive to visual info or again a shy phase of development. (however I believe what we all call "shy" is really behavior manifested from sensory issues...!)

Overall, it sound like typical development, but it's hard for readers only having a tiny glimpse. You know and see much more obviously than what can be conveyed in a post, thus again, if you have concerns a quick email or visit to your pediatrician would suite you best:=)

Good luck!

Rebecca - posted on 08/21/2010

2

17

0

I don't think it is I think that is just a excited only child.

My daughter is autistic and I have known since she was 18 months, at that age she would not play with anyone including me, she loved her routine, she lined things up, she would not show affection at all, I didn't get a cuddle till 4, she did not talk, she lined things up. Now at 5.5 she gets excited around anyone else and jumps all over them, her Pead said it is because she is still very immature and doesn't know how to play with or act around other kids.

Your child does not sound autistic at all

Alisa - posted on 08/21/2010

5

8

0

Have you had her eyesight checked? Our youngest used to not make eye contact, seemed to stare off into space and not point to things. He has glasses now. Although I should say he is also autistic but he had more markers than your daughter such as touch issues, no noises when playing, didn't play with others, full on fits when his routine was changed or there were crowds of people around. But maybe it wouldn't hurt to test for Autism either. He went thru a bunch of programs until age 3 when they finally diagnosed him autistic and after 4 yrs in specialized programs he's about to be mainstreamed into a regular 1st grade class (I'm both excited and very nervous). So definitely get her eyes tested and if it makes you feel better look into the Autism too.

Marianne - posted on 08/20/2010

59

16

15

Hello There. In short, I have 2 autistic boys and none of the behaviours you have spoken of are in the slightest bit similar to how my boys were as toddlers. My youngest, still a toddler has no interest what so ever in other children. he totally disregards them most of the time. Will play near them but not with them. I truly dont feel you have any case for alarm ad it sounds as though you have a lovely little girl reaching all her milestones

Donita - posted on 08/20/2010

13

6

1

Our soon to be three year old daughter also exhibited several little "quirks" that we couldn't pinpoint as obvious autism. About two months after she turned two, we decided to take her in to her pediatrician when London seemed to stop talking to us and only repeat what she remembered from books and TV. There were several other things, too. But, mostly she seemed to be a normal toddler. She was diagnosed pretty quickly and went right into speech and occupational therapy. On our end, the TV went off and we spent almost all of her waking hours interacting with her. Less than six months later, she has blossomed from a toddler who didn't really ask for anything, interacted little with us, who was very shy around strangers, gave little eye contact, and didn't know how to engage in pretend play to a girl who is so much more social, talks to us all day, pretends, jumps (she couldn't before), asks for (or demands) what she wants, and seems to have no discomfort with eye contact. Her future looked bleak in the beginning of this journey. But, now we have no worries other than what parents would normally worry about for their children. Definitely see your pediatrician. If your daughter is in the spectrum, catching and treating it early will give her her best chances for success. And, don't let experts predict her future. You never know.

User - posted on 08/20/2010

837

9

263

Hi Linda,

Does she have any overt behaviour concerns (e.g. self injurious behaviours, screaming for long periods of time?). Does she smile at you, respond to you?
Can she follow a simple one step instruction (get your doll or hands up!)

My son always responded positively to seeing people...in fact, this was one reason why his diagnosis took until aged four...he seemed "social" enough to most people even though I had concerns.

So, as Theresa stated, since you have concerns go see your family doctor OR go to an infant developmental screening clinic (if they have them in your area). Outside opinions/help from professionals might shed some light on your concerns.

Good luck to you.

Sheila.

Theresa - posted on 08/20/2010

1,310

22

231

The best thing to do if you have concerns is talk to her doc. A lot of toddlers don't want to interact with other kids. At that age they are still very "me" oriented. I have a high functioning autistic son. There were no clear signs until he got to be school aged. Even then no one thing was clear, it was adding up a lot of little things that made us get the diagnosis. We also did foster care for an autistic 2 year old. He would get excited when our boys would get home from school, he also got excited when we would go visit reletives, he just had no iterest in interacting with them. Each child is different and it also depends on the level of autism. Talk to her doc.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms