rage and autism

Candace - posted on 12/15/2009 ( 44 moms have responded )

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My son is almost 11 and is having the worst rage outbursts. It has been going on for a year now. He is hitting, attacking us, biting, slapping, yelling, and now swearing. He attacked his teacher last week and scratched her hand. His teachers had to restrain him with bean bags to protect themselves, my son, and the class. His outbursts are almost daily and they seem to be getting worse. We have two other children and I'm concerned about what this is doing to them. They cry and cling to us in fear. I feel all alone and wondering what we are going to do with him. We can't live in fear but we can't live without our son either. Help!!!

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Christine - posted on 12/15/2009

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Hi,

I'm a Speech-Language Pathologist who works with children with Autism. My advice is to see a behavioral therapist who specializes in working with behaviors related to autism and other disorders. You'll be able to find information on the internet and you may be able to get a recommendation from your family doctor, special education department, or even a local Speech-Language Pathologist! The behavioral specialist will work with your child and your family to set up a program specific to your child's needs. Every member of your child's team (teachers, SLP, and others) will need to work with your family and the behavioral therapist every step of the way. The behavioral plan will be something that everyone will need to be a part of for it to work. I hope this helped!

Magen - posted on 12/27/2009

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I have to say I am so glad that so many mothers have had such great advice. My son is still young and we have been able to control his anger though non medication routes. I want to talk to you about the gf/cf diet. It can be expensive if you go to health food stores and buy all the specialty stuff which is what I did in the begining because that's what I thought I was supposed to do. But I have learned some alternatives. You can go the super cheap route which is just eliminating all gluten and casein with no substitues which would mean a meat, fruit and vegetable diet. But you must be careful gluten and casein are hiding in all kinds of foods. Lunch meats are the worst. You will need to read ingredients and avoid MSG aka monosodium glutemate and sodium casinate. I beleive parkay is a casein free margarin. Sugar and artificial colors and flavors can also alter their brain chemistry. If you decide to go down that path you will probably need a good vitamin. But I have discovered Peptidase which is an enzyme that breaks down gluten and casein into their harmless amino acids. I use Kirkman labs because they are cheap and autism friendly. Google them you may find many things that can help you. I also use lavender oil (I put it on my son live perfume dabbed on neck and wrists) and breathing and counting techniques. I don't know if these will work for you but they have worked for my son. I know that his outbursts are scary for you and your family but try to imagine how terrifiying they are for your son. He has feelings he can not express and is probably begining the testoterone fest which is male puberty. And testoterone causes increased aggression. Does he excersise? I'm sure you are saying, "what make him stronger are you crazy", but 30 minutes of cardio a day may really help him. The endorophins will help calm him and help him expend some energy. Remeber all medications have side effects so check into those to see if changing or eliminating some helps. Good luck and remeber though he can't always tell you he loves you and needs your love.

Sue - posted on 12/26/2009

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I dnt knw wat to say bt im sure u r blessed wit strength n patience to handle such situation. My prayer wil always be with those who hav children wit autism..

Corie - posted on 12/26/2009

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My son started extreme raging at age 10. He is now 17. Things are better now but it has been a long road. My son has asperger's and was dx'ed at age 8. We did sensory, therapy, IEP's, meds ( adderal and respirodone were not the most helpful). We even had a functional behavior assessment, anger management etc through an autism clinic here in MO. I always believed in my gut that he was very anxious all the time but it came to a head during puberty and in middle school. He never acted out in school-just refuse to work. At home it was a different story, he wanted to rule the roost. I know he wanted control to be able to predict what would happen, but that doesn't not work well in a family. I was afraid to get him up in the am, afraid to drive in the car- he was so physically abusive. We were looking for a residential placement but could not afford the cost. I finally called the police and got support, I gave up custody but not parental rights and he was hospitalized for 2 wks for med management( in the past it would only last for 5 days), then to Boys and Girls town for around 9 mo. He learned about his disability, gained self-control, living in a group, gained self-esteem and confidence in school. He is very bright and has many gifts, his anxiety level is down and when he makes mistakes the rage is not as bad and we can talk about it and negotiate changes. I am no longer afraid that I will be kicked in the head, and I can leave his sister(13) and him at home for about 1 hr w/o worry. He is in an alternative school with no homework and is getting B+ grades. He is doing great-not perfect but great compared to 1 yr ago. We are still in therapy and he has been home since August. He knows what he has to do to stay at home, and wants to stay at home. It is important to get "outside" help. They have access to resources most folks can't afford. Good luck- I never thought I would have to do what I did 1 yr ago when he was 10 or 12, I wish I had made the call when the violence started, maybe it would not have gone on so long. Perhaps the "experts" know more now- when I was begging for help 7 yrs ago there was nothing in my area short of sending him to John Hopkins for residential- that was way out of our ability.
n

[deleted account]

Sounds to me like there may be more going on than you think. My son was first diagnosed with a mood disorder due to this type of behavior (early onset bipolar disorder) ODD ADHD and once we started him on a mood stabilizer and some other med combos, he is doing soo much better! It has come to the point that regardless of his diagnosis, you MUST protect yourself from this behacior. Do you have respite care? Can you or your hubby calm him down without being attacked? The last 3 times my son has done this, we hospitalized him to protect him from hurting himself as well as us, because my son gets out of control and starts hurting himself too. I'd contact the psychiatrist he sees FIRST THING and DEMAND some help. These disorders very frequently occur with other types of mood disorder. Call me or text me if you need toi talk! I'm in the treches with you and it looks like we are in good company!!
Tina 803-720-4133

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Carrie - posted on 04/01/2011

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My 6 year old son has talked violant sence he was 2,he was siagnosed with high functioning asd. It was strange when he was 2 he got up one morning as happy as he could be lookied at me and said "i am going to kill you today" I know he didnt know what that meant ,but as he has goten older it has goten wore and i took him to the local mental heath clinic here and they seen him a few times ,but he would shut down and then they said they couldnt help him,so next time we go to the specialist i am going to have to tell her we have to do somthing,because its just geting out of hand.

Carolyn - posted on 03/22/2011

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I've been in your shoes and we are currently working with a behavior specialist in our home and school. Our son has attacked his teacher and other children, been sent home and nearly suspended. We are making progress, not as quickly as we would like, but things are getting better.

Elizabeth - posted on 01/03/2010

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My little girl used to suffer horrible rages, many times violent. Turns out that public school was her stressor. She couldn't make friends, got hit in the head a lot, called names (like, the little dummy), couldn't eat the food, and hated most everything about school in general. (she's also very small for her age) She didn't understand "how" to communicate with peers or teachers, and basically walked around for 8 hours miserable. The teachers said she was just "flat".
I've removed her from school to be home-schooled. The violence is almost non-existant. She still becomes angry when frustrated, but the rages have all but disappeared.
Search for his "trigger", that can be like looking for a needle in a haystack, but once you find it, you'll ALL be a lot happier. Good luck!

[deleted account]

The rage cycle looks like a bell curve. The upward swing is the when the child is stimulated for some reason and starts to "rumble"-- there are usually warnings from him/her. These would be increased flapping, sensory input requests, verbalizations, sweating, etc. The rage stage is the upper portion of the bell curve-- the part you described. Interestingly enough- our autisic children usually do not remember the details of this stage. And then they calm down. Your son is 11-- often the chemical beginning of puberty for males. Is he on any other meds? Has anything else changed? What grade is he in? In school- children spend K-3 learning to read. They then read to learn and are required to demonstrate comprehension of that reading. If he does not understand his school work-- that could be uspetting him and he may need MORE modifications and reduction of work.

The key is to identify some of the triggers and prevent these rages. I'd go see a medical doctor and a counselor that can look at some medications that might help too.

And learn how to restrain properly. Which sounds like the school did so. Are you prepared for a rage attack in a restaurant? You need to have some plans in place " incase" -- seriously it is better for everyone involved.

I'd also document everything so you have good info for the doctors.

Hope this helps.

Karen - posted on 01/01/2010

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maybe he feels overwhelmed with certain situations and these outbursts are the only way he can communicate this. maybe his school will provide him with a smaller class, or a quiet place to be for a little while each day to help him unwind for being over stimulated? is he entering puberty early? the hormones from puberty might be helping these rages too. you are not alone. you have friends to vent to and who care what you are going through.

Rebecca - posted on 01/01/2010

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My son is 10. He has rage issues as well. He was in public school but his behaviors were so violent he was finally transferred to a therapeutic school. Even there he has issues, I've actually had to drive to pick him up because the couldn't get him to calm down. Earlier this year we got him involved in an extended day program and his behaviors still were violent. As part of their procedure, when a child is violent and unsafe they call the police and ambulance for the child be taken to the er for an evaluation. This was done 3 times in 6 weeks. The second time he was taken to a larger hospital with a unit dedicated to children's pschyatric issues. This stay only lasted 2 days because of insurance. The third time the after school called the police went thru the same steps but this time he stayed at the larger hospital for 5 1/2 weeks then into a sub acute program for 3 1/2 mo. He was ok finally returning home but 2 weeks before christmas he had another bad episode went thru all these steps again, stayed at the hospital for 2 weeks. He was able to come home for christmas but 8 days later he is back on the unit. We have found he thrives when he is in that very structured environment. He has made friends, talks in groups and ndividual therapy, has learned to play his younger brother, etc... It has been really hard for me as his mom to deal with the fact that I can't give him what he needs right now, but when we visit him at the hospital and he is smiling, joking , laughing, making friends weknow he is ok. I want him to succeed and he does that in these structured settings.

Kathy - posted on 12/25/2009

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Hi, my heart goes out to you. I have a son with Aspergers who displayed similar outbursts of rage at the age of 12. We were told it was due to puberty and hormones raging which he did not understand or know what to do with. I can offer no advice, but to hang in there. My son is now 15 and though he can still fly off the handle it is no way as extreme as it was, he has certainly settled and is growing into a lovely young man.

Naomi - posted on 12/22/2009

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my son was on risperdal and we took him off ourselves as it made him worse to take after a year or so. He had terrible rages against his brother which haven't stopped totally but have improved. He is very tall now and is very well built so discipline can be hard. He hated the risperdal as it made him sleepy but not in a good way. I agree with looking into diet and nutrician, when I started following the Slimming World plan to lose weight, the children both ate the same as me and both his and his brother, who has adhd, behaviour improved drastically.

MeLissa - posted on 12/22/2009

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Hi Candace. I know how hard this can be. Our 6 year old autistic son went through a horrible rage stage where he would literally attack our younger child or himself. He threw a desk at his class in his autistic school. He was on Abilify and that caused his rage to be worse. We took him off of the medication and that did help improve his mood. Now he has them when he is jealous. It is still something we struggle with, but maybe his body is changing and he doesn't understand what is going on. That could cause a lot of stress for a normal child, never mind one that has autism. First thing I would suggest is consulting his neurologist/pyschologist about possible side effects and maybe changing his medication. I am sure they could also do some type of work with him to help him learn to control his behaviors. I would also suggest talking with him about what is going on. Maybe if he understood some of the things going on with him, every male goes through, that would help some.

It doesn't seem like much but I hope something helps. I know how hard this particular part of autism is.

Alisha - posted on 12/22/2009

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I noticed that you said he was on adderall. My 11 yr old was started on that earlier this yr to help with her issues (she has Aspergers w/ OCD, bipolar disorder, grandiose delusions, and hallucinations to name a few). She has always had violent outbursts but never like the ones she had on Adderall. I had to call the police to help me get under control and put her in the hospital for a few days because she was becoming a danger to herself (running out into the street and almost got hit by a car) not to mention those around her. It turns out that the Adderall was making her psychotic-intensifying her mood disorder instead of helping to balance it. Maybe it is having the same effect on him. She still has some violent outbursts but not as bad or lasting as long. She is now taking Depakote, Leviothyroxine, Coginten, Abilify, Conserta, and Singular her moods aren't perfect but they are much better than they have ever been. I just hope that when puberty does start it doesn't take as long to figure out the right combination (this combination took us 7 yrs to figure out). The best of luck to you,I know it isn't easy and it is scary for the younger ones (I have a 5 and a 6 yr old), but hang in there you will get through it.
Alisha

Lisa - posted on 12/22/2009

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Even when he hurt the person he loves most in all the world his mind was reacting to painful,uncontrollable urges that welled up inside him rather than from any desire to hurt.It was done against his own wishes, under the influence of impulses he could neither understand nor resist.KENZABURO--A Personal Matter

Lisa - posted on 12/22/2009

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My son is now 18 and for 5 years now we have been dealing with the rage inside him.Rispedal was the worse made his teeth rot out and gained 40 pounds.Please check that everthing is alright at school after putting my son on lots of differant meds we found out he was being harassed and abused by another child at school and when we took him out of school after years of trying to make him feel safe again at others schools and setting he began to calm down. he now takes a low dose of concerta and a ativan in the evening and is doing very well still some outburst when he dont get his way but only last few min now not hours and hours.Its the hardest thing we been through and my youngset son is still scared of him i hope they will one day be close again.if autistic kids are lashing out they are hurting somewhere for some reason we just have to find the reason and try to help!

RHODA - posted on 12/21/2009

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MY REPLY TO YOU, I HAVE TWO BOYS TURN 13 YEARS OLD AND I TRUELY FEELS YOUR CONCERN, PRAYER CHANGES SITUATION, AND BEING STRONG, BECAUSE YOU ARE TRUELY BLESSED, ARE KIDS ARE VERY SPECIAL IN DEED, AND THATS IS THE WAY, TRY GOD!!!!!!!!!!

Karen - posted on 12/21/2009

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Neurtin and Adderal was the worst for Alex, he gained 75 lbs almost over night and was depressed all the time.

He is on the Depakote, Wellbutrin and Serquil and doing so/so but he says he feels the war in his brain. 19 years old and wondering why he was born!

Karen - posted on 12/21/2009

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My son is 19 and although his rages and meltdowns have improved as he has grown up, he is still disconnected with reality. To look at him and as an outsider observe him he looks atypical, but he does not see the world around him and he is coping with life changes. In college but failing, not connecting with people and becoming stagnant...what's a parent to do???

Kristy - posted on 12/21/2009

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My son is only 3 so his fits of rage are pretty mild compared to your son's. One thing I have noticed that really helps is to get him on a gluten and casein free diet and to eliminate all food allergies. It is likely that his in ability to control himself is becuase he is having allergic reactions to the foods that he is eating. I feel for you, you should also look into getting him on some serious nutritional supplements like digestive enzymes and selenium. It may not put the genie back in the bottle but as soon as you figure out what he is allergic too, after a few weeks you should start seeing a whole new kid. Also try reading up on Autism, there are many good books out there that can help you understand what's going on with your son. I recommend Healing the New Childhood Epidemics: Autism, ADHD, Asthma, and Allergies: The Groundbreaking Program for the 4-A Disorders by Kenneth Bock and Cameron Stauth. You can get it on Amazon.com I think I got the name through one of the many autism support websites. I have this book and it has really opened my eyes. My son has only been officially diagnosed as autistic for about 6 months now and we are already seeing big improvements in his behavior as well as other areas. Good luck, I hope this helps.

Geralyn - posted on 12/21/2009

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Candace, you have to get immediate help at both home and school. I agree with Sharon that you need a behavior analyst. You should request an immediate IEP meeting to deal with the issue, and I would request that you be provided hours of consultation and training in the home, too.



There is a voluntary listing of BCBAs at the following website, listed by state:



http://www.bacb.com/consum_frame.html



If you'd like to contact me, please feel free to leave a message on my profile page.

Juanell - posted on 12/21/2009

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Candance,

First and formost i am going to tell you to pray and i am going to pray for you and your family. Second, ARe you keeping a Diary of his outburst( noting what was going on around the outburst). My son will be 11 in Jan and he is very outspoken all of a sudden. When boys hit puberty so many emotions are going on ontop of his daily frustrations. As far as the baths my son did not like the way water felt you can obtain a waterless soap that will clean him just as if he had a bath and at the same time work with him on the water issues...my son screamed, hit , kick everything you can think of and i went to doing that first then bathing him out of a bowl then a bird bath dont forget everything is going on so fast for him and he cant slow things down being a parent is the hardest job on this planet ....start to educate your younger children as soon as you can that helped with my younger son also i can write so many things for you to try all night i fully understand all that you are going thru but also research his meds ......Educate yourself as much as possiable and always remember to take time out for yourself..

[deleted account]

i agree with you joy. it is such a difficult thing to do....especially when no matter what you do ,you are seen as a "bad parent"...sorry,thats what has happened to me. im a "bad parent" according to some people,cos im not strict enough!...but im a "bad parent" also cos im too strict.its a no win situation...just have to do whats best for your children!!!!! :-)

Joy - posted on 12/21/2009

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I had the same thing happening. I know your helpless feeling. I had to ask for help when my son at the age of 14 put me in the E.R. after attacking me when i told him to get in the truck because he didnt have a coat on. it was dec in wyoming. very cold. my boyfriend showed up and my son stopped. he took me and my son to his folks house. It was because of them and the support that they gave me that i did what had to be done. I called his consuler and they told me to call the cops. they came and got him. I cried and wondered for days if I had done the right thing. My son is now 17 and has been going to a treatment center. He is so much happier now. they have got him on meds and have helped him with life skills. he will be going to a halfway home inthe spring. It was the hardest call I have ever had to make. and i questioned weither it was the right one to make.But now when i see my son and he is smiling and happy and can do things for hisself. almost normal. he wants a car and a drivers liesence. he even now has his first girlfriend. Talk to local consulers or a doctor. It depends on the state that you are in as to what you have avilable to you. you and your son need help that you can only get from professionals. I tried to do it on my ownand with heop from family. but they can only help with the support you and your son have to live with this daily. Good luck and god bless.

Kelly - posted on 12/20/2009

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Candace,
My son is 11 and on trileptal for a mood disorder. When he was 8 years old, we went to the Amen Clinic in Virginia for a brain scan and we learned alot about his brain function. The mood disorder can be aggravated by stimulants (like ADD medication) and should be treated before ADD meds are given. We also got a lot of information from Dr. Kay in Lancaster, PA. I don't know where you live but I can look up contact information if you are interested. I know how you feel! Keep trying different things - you never know what might work! Good Luck!

Candace - posted on 12/20/2009

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THanks to everyone for their help and comments. We just had another bad night. We haven't been able to get him to shower in over a week and tonight was the night to get clean. We gave him options (either now or after dinner). It was a HUGE mess with him yelling, getting physical, him having to be restrained, and me in the basement with our two frightened babies (5 months and 18 months). I think he has always had the anger - it's just getting worse over time. Maybe it's puberty. I don't know. He's on meds (Adderall) and we just got him off Risperdal (thank goodness!). We are trying Neurontin which is not helping. He complains of being dizzy all the time and he has a lot of twitches. We've tried pretty much everything else, including Tenex. Nothing works for him. It's either way to strong or not strong enough. We have a behavior analyst who comes to the house. We showed her video tapes of his outrages (we taped because doctors didn't believe us because he was always so well behaved during visits). She gave us tips and they helped, somewhat and only for a short time. We have a neurologist, neurosurgeon, psychiatrist, physicologist, and case manager. My son also has developmental delays because he was a 28 week premie with a grade III hemorrhage. I'm not sure which behavior is the brain damage and what is the autism. He also has a severe stutter which makes things ten times worse. I'm sooo frustrated right now and scared for him and my girls. We can't live this way. I wouldn't mind trying the CF/GF diet but I heard it's very expensive. I'm not even sure where to start with it. I have been reading Jenny McCarthy's book but stopped when my girls were born. We have paused speech therapy for now because it's a trigger due to the stuttering. It's like we hit a huge wall no matter where we turn.

Sharon - posted on 12/20/2009

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I agree with many of the previous posts here, it could be an issue of him approaching puberty or sudden changes in diet or medication. My biggest concern would be that the staff at school restrained him so improperly. They should be better trained on proper restraint. The school should also be doing a functional behavior assessment (FBA) in order to figure out the triggers involved in these outbursts. This would lead to a behavior intervention plan (BIP) that could aid the staff in knowing how to better handle the outbursts if they get that far.

I would contact a behavior analyst for an assessment of what the triggers are at home that cause these outbursts. The analyst could then give you better strategies for handling the meltdowns when they happen. I hate to suggest medicating, but if he is becoming a danger to your family, there are meds that help with the rage. My son is on resperidol and it helps a great deal.

Jennifer - posted on 12/20/2009

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I have a little girl with aspergers and so far she has not been shown any violent traits but my boyfriends sister who is also autistic and been off the charts in her behaviour. She is 13 and acting out extremely violently and she has a great deal of strength for a girl that young, her mother is not recieving any help but this is because she won't push for it. Social Workers have suggested that she send her to her room to hit pillows...this just isn't an option when your child can over power you and is ready to lash out at anyone who approaches them. So my advice to you is to push there are systems and people out there to help but sometimes asking once won't get you there don't let anyone say it will pass, or it's a phase. Say thats not good enough my family needs help, support and action to taken to get us through it. So keep pushing and good luck

Joyce - posted on 12/19/2009

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if your son is on any medication I would recomend that you talk to his doctor about the side effects my son who is now almost 12 was having horrendous outbursts of rage and we found out that it was a side efect of some of his medications and also the way his medications interacted with each other. due to removing some meds we have had a rage free child for almost a year now, although we do have to deal with a very wound up child it is definetly worth it.

Adria - posted on 12/19/2009

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I have read the previous comments but honestly the best answer to me was the speech therapist... I just want to add that I really think angry outbursts from autistic children are usually about their frustration of not being understood, sensory overloads etc. I spoke with the Occupational Therapist and she has calmed him down a lot by keeping his sensory overloads under control, that combined with the two speech therapists that he have that help him communicate his needs, and the behavior intervention TEAM constantly working on ways of helping him cope with his own feelings... has been the key.

Heidi - posted on 12/18/2009

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Hi Candace,
I have a 10 year old with autism. He has/had a huge impulse control issue. We worked with his diet, school and ABA staff with little to no success. Finally we decided to medicate him. It was the hardest decision we have had to face in terms of dealing with his autism. Although I still hate the fact that he is taking meds, I no longer have to worry about his behavior in school. He is in general ed with an aid, but no longer has outbursts. I am hoping that eventually he can stop taking them as he naturally matures. After you have tried every other avenue, this may be something to consider. It is a heck of a decision to have to make. The best advice I can give you is to educate yourself as much as possible on your options (behaviorial and otherwise) and make the best choice for YOUR family. Good luck and God Bless =)

Reba - posted on 12/18/2009

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I also second the slp. We began picking our 9 year old up from school for half days. Had tried for 2 years to educate staff, etc. We eventually pulled him out of school, then we found a class that uses the ABA program. The teacher that implements the program is the "behavioral specialist" and we work very closely together. He now attends full days and does not come home ready to battle. We also no longer have to force him to dress and go to school!

Reba - posted on 12/18/2009

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Hi. I have an 11 year old asperger son and a 9 year old autistic son. Obviously environment (school, diet, etc.) and development can be extra stressors, but, a high number of children with pdd also have other disorders. My boys suffer from bipolar disorder as well. You know your child best. If you don't seem to be able to pin point where in the environment the behavior is stemming from you might want to consider a mood disorder as well. Speak with your doctor, he may suggest just a short trial of medication to see if there is an improvement. Medications are scary business for concerned moms and you might be saying already, "No way!", but take it from a mom who's been there, if it's a mood disorder it will only get worse without medical intervention. You don't have to commit to anything, but consider just a one or two week trial of medication if your doctor feels it's appropriate. Reba

[deleted account]

Candace, I do understand. My grandson is almost 15 and seldom goes into a rage anymore. But a few years ago, it was terrible. I don't have other children living with me, but I was doing some babysitting in my home. His rages are one of the reasons that I stopped doing this. I think that he has gotten better because he and I have learned what some of his triggers are. We avoid those things as much as possible.

[deleted account]

candace...i am the mother of a 14yr old boy. i had to give custody to his father because he would have killed myself and/or his 4yr old sister. i have tried to help him......but the only people who really understand what it is like are the mum's. i so wish i could wave a magic wand...and provide you with help. :-(

Helen - posted on 12/18/2009

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You poor thing and your family. My son is 4 & half and for the last year has done the same thing to me and has just been diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome, which is an Autistic Spectrum Disorder. I don't know where you are, but there is so much help out there these days. That Speech therapist said it all. You can also get a heads up on handling certain situations whilst in the process of getting him some help on the net. Look up some social stories for him on Carol Grey website and go to Tony Attwood site too, there is alot of info to read for you to better equip yourself too. Goodluck and a I wish you and your family all the best, as it is a hard age for him right now too.

Gunda - posted on 12/17/2009

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Been through the violent stage after much therapy and working with social behaviour specialist my son got better but still every so often still has outraged behaviour.
It takes a lot of patience and love from the family even though there is non in return good luck and yes the speach therapist has great advise.

Sheila - posted on 12/16/2009

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Prior to a year ago, what was he like? Is he approaching puberty? HAs there been a change in family dynamics? Have you moved? How verbal is he?

I ask these questions because you mentioned it started a year ago, so I am wondering if there was trigger.

You need help for your son, as Christine has suggested, but also for your family. You don't have to live without him, but you can get respite care (at least, I hope you can) If you are in Ontario, can contact the Children's Aid Society. A social worker can help you navigate a path to support...or, look into Community and Social Services. If you are in the States, your system is so different from ours that I couldn't begin to offer any help.

I have read in this forum that there is a medication used for blood pressure that helps with raging (I think it is Tenex) but I am not sure of side effects/long term impact. Get to your family physician/pediatrician and tell him/her you need help with your child.

Good luck,

Sheila

Verity - posted on 12/16/2009

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HI i have a 13 year old with Autism/Asperger syndrome and we have gone through the violence thing with him too. He ended up only doing half days at school because of his outbursts and at home we would have to protect our two daughters constantly. He used to go to a main stream primary school but since 11 he has been going to a special school which has helped him deal with his anger and violence so well that the outburst are few and far between. Our son suffers anxiety and that is what causes most of his outbursts due to his frustration. We found that because our son was changing physically aswell that this caused him great stress as he couldn;t understand what was happening to him. Your son may be feeling anxious inside about things around him and sometimes the violence is the only way to deal with it. Try and see if you can get someone to help him express his feelings in a different way or try yourself. Using pictures helped us and feelings cards. I can only hope that it settles down like our son has. He still gets violent sometimes so we keep a close watch on him but now he can explain his feelings slightly better, we are also noticing an affectionate side. Good luck and hope all goes well x

Stacey - posted on 12/15/2009

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I have an almost 3 year old son with Autism. He is not violent at all so I really dont know much about this area of Autism however, we have had our Son on the gfcf (gluten-free, casein-free) diet for almost 6 months and he seems happier, healthier and is making improvements. Although a change in diet is unlikely to solve your problems altogether, it may make your son feel better (maybe he gets belly aches/ pain/ headaches from certain foods) and may help him calm down a little. The results of a gfcf diet are varied from mild improvement to dramatic improvement, to no improvement, but I think its worth a try, do some reading, google gfcf and see what you think. Good luck, hope it gets better for you.

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