Riding a bike.

Juliana - posted on 07/10/2011 ( 19 moms have responded )

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My son is 8 years old and still cant ride a bike without training wheels. He has aspergers. We have been working on it this summer. We are moving into a new house and will only be about 2 blocks from his new school. He wants to ride bike to school. I dont know how to teach him to ride his bike. He thinks he should just be able to get on and go. I watched him ride with his training wheels. He is behind in his gross motor skills and he doesnt have very stron leg muscles.
Any suggestions would be great, thanks.

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Juliana,



I would see if you can find a "lose the training wheels" special needs bike camp in your area. My son that has Autism learned to ride a two wheeler at one of their camps. If no camp is near you, try a handle that attaches to the back of his bike. Even though my son learned to ride on two wheels he still has a hard time starting and stopping. The handle provides support and you can stop or redirect the rider easily. The handle looks like a push bar for a tricycle. We got ours from the camp.



Seeing my son achieve a childhood milestone of riding a two wheeler was so sweet! Best of luck to you.

Leslee - posted on 07/13/2011

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My son has mild Cerebral Palsy with balance, strenght, coordination, etc challenges besides his fears of falling. He learned to ride a two-wheel bike at a camp called Loose The Training Wheels. Incrediable camp at Sonoma State University, but the camp moves around all over the country. Check out the website at LooseTheTrainingWheels.com. Within 2 days, he was riding on his own in the gym and on the third day the counselors had him outside on the paths around the campus. They also teach them how to start and stop and the rules of the road. Best camp ever. Oh, my son went there when he was 7 but he was one of the youngest, many teenagers go to the camp (so it is never too late). Have fun!

Michelle - posted on 07/12/2011

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keep pedaling... our son is going to be 9 this aug...He still has training wheels :) its ok...dont let other parents bring you down...go ride with him ..everyday :)

Grace - posted on 07/10/2011

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Make the bike low enough so he can scoot. Take off the training wheels but make him scoot (i.e. both feet pushing the floor and let go, but tell him not to put his feet on the pedals yet). When he can scoot and balance the bike for some distance, then you can have him start putting his feet on the pedals. You probably have to hold the back of the bike (by the seat) and "jog" along next to him for a few trials.

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19 Comments

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Gotfaithm - posted on 08/28/2011

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My son is 12 years old and still complains when riding his bike it has no training wheels and im hoping to get him to complete the ride but he still has a hard time with balance.

Nadine - posted on 07/13/2011

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@Joyce - So sorry to hear about your father having difficulty with your son's diagnosis! I know for a long time, our extended family just thought Jonathan had behavioral issues and just needed some "good ol' fashioned parenting" such a relief when they finally came around!

Debi - posted on 07/13/2011

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My son was 10 before he could ride a bike and wasn't afraid of the swimming pool. It just takes a little longer due to their lack of coordination/balance. I would be hesitant to get him the pedals that click their feet in only because if he goes to fall, it's sometimes harder to get that foot out to stop himself. My adult friend broke her elbow falling because she couldn't get her foot out of one of them quickly enough.

Just give him time to get comfortable with it. Have you taken off the training wheels and see how he does? Perhaps that would show him that he needs more work?

User - posted on 07/13/2011

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Hi,

You might also try changing the pedals. Go to a bike shop, and get pedals that have a "casing" so that his foot does not "leave" the pedal (it might also be a velcro stra). Many children with hypo-sensitivity can't "feel" the food/pedal connection and this helps to keep contact so they can keep the pedalling action up long enough to build up some momentum.

Sheila

Shannon - posted on 07/12/2011

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Oh, also when you do try it you may want to try a grassy or sandy area and lots of padding and a helmet. If he gets hurt he may be timid about trying again. A tip my physical therapist gave us. My son learned on a baseball field not far from our home.

Shannon - posted on 07/12/2011

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My son has Asperger's and he just turned 11. He didn't learn to ride a bike without training wheels until last summer when he had just turned 10. It takes a while for Aspergers kids sometimes. He has been in physical therapy for the last 5 yrs and they kept telling me it was hard for him because of his muscle tone. Your child may have the same problem and may not be able to help himself because of this. If your child goes to physical therapy talk to the therapist about it. Just so you know my son was 10 before he could do it and we had tried and tried. If your son doesn't see a physical therapist and it seems he is weak in some areas, you may want to have an evaluation. Good luck!

Michelle - posted on 07/12/2011

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My daughter is 8 and just got the hang of riding without training wheels. She still can't stop, but we're working on that. Just take him someplace safe to practice (a playground, an empty parking lot, etc.). This will help build his leg muscles. Also, gradually raise the training wheels a little off the ground. It will help him learn to balance. Lastly, be patient. It may take him a long time, but he'll get it. :-)

Hayley - posted on 07/12/2011

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My daughter is 11 almost 12 (nov) and she still cant ride a bike without training wheels, she battles tremendously with training wheels too, at that same age she really wanted to ride her bike to school as well and i lt her with her training wheels and all and i just walked along side of her and helped, she really enjoyed this.

Lorri - posted on 07/12/2011

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my son could not @ 8 either. then i saw him riding the kids who had smaller bikes. so i went and bought him a small bike @ salvation army store and held on to the back of the seat while he peddled ,he was riding by the end of the week :)

Coralie - posted on 07/12/2011

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My son is 16 and still can't balance right to ride a bike, he has now given up on the idea. Don't kno if scooters r popular where u r but here in Oz they were /are quite popular and he manages this ok (wouldn't say he is very smooth or graceful but he doesn't care so I don't either :-))

Joyce - posted on 07/12/2011

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Myn son is 11 yrs old and won't even try to ride a bike for fear of failing. His dad and I are trying to encourage him without making him feel bad, but his grandpa gets angry and thinks he's just being stubborn., and wants to "make" him do it himself. We won;t let this happen. This has caused alot of family spats, as my father won't accept my sons diagnoisis.

Lee Etta - posted on 07/12/2011

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My son didn't even begin to be able to until age 8 also. He has Asperger's as well. He was not able to swing himself on a swing until age 9(he still has a hard time and is 10). It just takes time.

Lori - posted on 07/12/2011

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My daughter was 9 when she learned. Some kids, it just takes time. No real tricks...just lots of practice.

Nadine - posted on 07/10/2011

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I can completely relate! My son (also has Asperger's) at that age still couldn't ride for anything, or swim or do any other activities that involved large muscle coordination. He is 13 now and loves riding his bike and I can't wait to take him to the pool! My best recommendation is really to work with him on getting the bilateral coordination down (where his left and right sides of his body are communicating and working together) I can list a whole slew of exercises, but we went through a program called Brain Balance and it helped him tremendously with his coordination among other things!

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