signs

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Kristen - posted on 03/09/2011

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Natasha - Obviously, it is very hard to tell when kids are so young, but I always tell parents to got with their mommy instinct. My daughter was diagnosed with PDD-NOS just before her 3rd b-day. Your son looks very much like she did in many ways. He has many issues that are considered spectrum. But, you do not have to wait! Go find a DAN dr. in your area right away. Early intervention is absolutely key. The earlier you begin treatment, the better their chances for help and recovery. I would go to ari.com - the Autism Research Institute and take the ATEC test. It will give you a good idea of where he stands, what some of his deficits might be. I have found this very helpful for parents. Also, have you tried the GF/CF diet with him? Do you give hi any cod liver oil to help with eye contact. How about vitamins? Many of our kids are deficient in the B's, zinc and magnesium. Watch his behaviour after certain foods...anything with red dyes, preservatives, etc. I am a Rescue Angel for GenerationRescue.org which is another great site to get more information about your son. I have spoken to countless parents over the last 6.5 years to offer support, links and services that may be helpful and share our experiences. My daughter had no eye contact, she would spin in circles, not respond to her name, had about 20 single words, had no receptive or expressive language and no interest in any social activities with her peers. She would not play appropriately with toys and had a very limited diet, with sensory issues (hated loud noises). We were told she would never have friends. With early intervention and following the DAN protocol, she is now a happy, healthy 10 year old. She attends public school (no aide) and excels academically. She does Girl Scouts, plays soccer, is in the school musical, does theater and has a ton of friends. No one who meets her would ever even think autism had been a part of her life. If you would like to chat, I'd be more than happy to speak with you and offer some suggestions on how to start. Feel free to message me. But, I would urge you to go to the generationrescue.org site as a place to start. Best of luck, Kris

Mary - posted on 03/10/2011

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You are getting a lot of great advice from the ladies here!
I have 4 kids.
1 Aspergers ( I knew at 7 mo there was an issue)
1 somewhere in the Spectrum or Bi Polar ... not sure he is 6
1 4 year old who is classic ADD/ADHD
and an almost 3 year old who is a Typical child.

I can tell you that there is something going on with your son and that he is very blessed to have an observant mom who wants the best for him.

Personally, I prefer a Ped Neuro over a Developmental Ped.
Either way, keep recording, take notes, and get him an evaluation from a Dr.
You are doing the right thing working with him.
My now 8 year old Aspie son makes great eye contact.
Now.. if I can get him to chew food... :)
(sensory issues)

Mary

Jo - posted on 03/07/2011

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Oh and food is a big issue because of "Sensory Integration Disorder" and "Tactile Defensiveness", my daughter has both. Something that could help is to be scientists. My daughter responds well when we use the other four senses to "evaluate" a food before tasting it, consequently most food smells like "cotton candy", but macaroni and cheese smells like flowers (LOL). We listen to, look at, touch, smell and finally lick (taste) our food. She ate macaroni and cheese for the first time EVER, two weeks ago. For her things are always the way they were the first time she experienced them, ie. I have to cover the sensors on ALL automatic flushers because the first time she was on one it flushed while she was on it; she gets up from her naps at 2:45pm every time I lay her down because once we had to leave at three and I told her she needed to lay down until 2:45. Make food as happy as you can, if your son has a "Rolodex" like my daughter, you'll need that positive experience to build future events.

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Antonietta - posted on 05/26/2011

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Hi Natasha, Everything you mentioned reminds me of my 3and half yar old angel. he got diagnossed with pdd at the age of 3 exactely. the earliest a child can get a diagnosis is 18 months. dont wait go as soon as possible to a child psychologist to get the diagnosis. in the meantime enroll your child to therapy (my son does ABA therapy) in 4 months his autisic liek manurisms have diminished a little and his vocabulary went from 25 words to 150+ words. the earlier you start the intervention the better good lck u r in my thoughts!
oh and most important the beginnign of this battle is a strong mother they need our strenght to grow be positive

Carlene - posted on 03/10/2011

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I totally agree with Allison! Get to a DAN dr in your neck of woods. We went to Georgia Davis in Springfield Il. granted they do not accept insurance (@ least she don't) and very expensive, they will get stuff done quick, they are not like other drs who jack around. and if his ped won't give you a referal, you don't need one:))

Debora - posted on 03/10/2011

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This sounds a lot like my son. He was diagnosed by one group of experts as either high functioning autism or asperger's. Others have said PDD or PDD-NOS. If I had to guess, from what you've told me, your son may be somewhere on the spectrum. Ask his pediatrician for a referral to an expert who deals with and diagnoses autism frequently.

Julie - posted on 03/10/2011

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Also you can call your local early intervention yourself by contacting Board of Developmental Disabilities or local Help Me Grow program.

Julie - posted on 03/10/2011

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Is he is speech therapy? Some insurance companies will pay for it now and some make you wait until two. He doesn't seem autistic or PDD from videos that I watched but he does have some characteristics of Childhood Apraxia of Speech. I would just keep working with him and try to get him into speech as soon as doctor will refer you. Call your local children's hospital and ask for speech department. Ask them directly how to get speech evaluation with your insurance policy.

Chasity - posted on 03/09/2011

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Its hard to know from a video but my daughter was diagnosed at 33 months, so it is possible to get a diagnosis before 3. Things that helped out though was we had her hearing checked by 2 specialist because a speech delay and ignoring you could be because they do not hear properly. Try to get that done first to rule that out and keep a scheduled journal for a few weeks before going into the neurologist, write down things that you notice and questions that you will want to go over with the dr. Good Luck

Kelley - posted on 03/09/2011

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When my son was 18 months I knew he was different to. Mom's just know. He was always a happy and smiley baby, but had very few words. He did look me in the eye most of the time and hug and kiss me. He liked to play alone and did line up his cars or blocks. I asked his Dr. about this at his 18 month visit and was told he was fine and that all babies develop at their own pace. At his 2 year visit nothing had really changed and again I was told by the pedi that nothing was wrong. I then got him an eval with our states ECI. He was speech delayed and (no hearing problems) and at risk for Autism. He is now 8 years old next week and considered mildly autistic. He is in a mainstream class with 2 1/2 a week support if he needs it, a A student except in reading b/c of dyslexcia to. He is a very social child and unless you are a health care professional in ASD you would never know there is an issue with him. Early intervention in so very important, and if you think something might be wrong then it probably is. To what extend - time will only tell but you best chance is get him the therapies he needs now. Best of luck to you. Oh and I wouldn't change a thing about my son, he's amazing. Quirky but so Cool.

Pamela - posted on 03/08/2011

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hello its so hard to tell at a young age. Have you looked into MERLD mixed expressive and receptive language disorder ? my son cameron who has just turned 3 has this. when he was 2 everyone pointed to him screeching Autism Autism Autism now he is 3 there is no way you would think that ( he i still very quirky!) his pretend play is where it should be if not a bit above. I watched the Video and Im not sure if thats how you play with him often or if its just for the video.. Id like to make a suggestion .. you probably know most of this any way but play along side him don't talk so much copy his play and comment a bit on what he is doing . also in your everyday routines comment say things like get clothes off. put plug in turn on tap get in bath wash your face. etc after a few times of doing this and making it fun wait for your son to say something so for instance put the plug in and then wait ! ( waiting is important gives the change for the child to stop and think ohh what am I ment to do/say ?) make a gesture and look at your son wait a bit then if he doesn't say anything say ohhh turn on taps use the same words every time you do the routine.. see if this gets him talking a great one with this is balloons or bubbles.. we love balloons here .. Cameron will hand me a balloon and I look at him and have a face ( a what do you want me to do face) he will say Blow up balloon.. so I blow it once and stop and wait he will then say Bigger we do this again until he says let go and we watch it fly around the room and laugh .. I get alot of tips from Cameron's language school who use the book "it takes 2 to talk".. I also find cameron talks alot more doing fun things like on the swings, slide or seesaw when he is out and about and not thinking about talking his words tend to just come out ..



Cameron was developmentally ahead rolled( 8 weeks sat up properly at 10 weeks, walked the day he turned 9 months first words froggy and doggy while pointing at 7 months stringing to words together at 14 months, until about 16 months then just stopped he wouldn't point any more he could name so many objects but could string things together.. its been alot of hard work and we have alot more to go. but I think we have cameron to only 9 months or so behind ( re assessment on the 29th !) and we will keep working on it to get him even with his peers. what ever your sons outcome no two kids with ASD are the same you need to find what's best for your son ..



oh and Cameron is also sensory seeking and avoiding ( but Im told he self regulates very well) which is why sometimes he can act a bit quirky he tends to go on the trampoline to work him self out or lay in the hammock to calm himself down if he is allowed to do this at school I would have no concerns but unfortunately heheh he can't just run around outside for 5 minutes to re focus himself.



Every single person is slightly sensory seeking or avoiding it just depends how it effects your life for instance I HATE having my toe nails touch or the sound of plastic on mental but it doesn't happen often .. some people cut there tags cause they can't stand the feeling .. some people lay in beanbags cause they love being cosy this is all sensory.

Yolanda - posted on 03/08/2011

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I have two that are PDD NOS and one that is autism..... Dominic does the hand flapping dont make eye contact he can be aggressive and he paces he use to run like no other in the store he also has sensory issues babies around 3 months or so start to stare at their hands dominic still does that he also stares at ceiling fans and anything that moves he is more talkative now but when he is excited or frustrated he dont speak thankfully his school taught him how to sign and he was diagnosis at age 2 well no i think it was just before he turned 2 his twin brother and his baby sister are PDD they tend to be aggressive and have very OCD tendencies they have to line things up by shapes colors and sizes and if they cant or one in the line is moved they have a meltdown they both have sensory issues just like dominic they dont like their head or ears touched and they were called pdd at age 2 as well not sure where you live but our city has a tots program its a special needs pre k that is helping them so much when dominic started there he wasnt talking and they got him signing and speaking they receive pt ot and speech this program takes regular children as well when they first go into the program they are tested to see if there are any delays and if there are they get an IEP i did start them off in help me grow which was also very helpful having shared all that i think it would be wise to go have your baby check especially if there is toe walking sometimes toe walking can raise some other questions about muscle tone in the legs n what not dominic is a toe walking and he has high muscle tones in his legs and low in his hands from the flapping again i think it would wise to make an appointment with a developmental specialist there many different programs out there to help i know i would be lost with out these programs

Maria - posted on 03/08/2011

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ask your pediatrician for a referral to a developmental pediatrician or a pediactric neurologist. Let them evaluate and tell you.

Cheryl - posted on 03/08/2011

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I have a son, who is now 10, that has PDD-NOS and he totally has what your son does. Remember that your son should have at least 5 things that are under the spectrum to be classified as PDD-NOS or any other diagnosis on the spectrum. He could have one or two and not be considered on the spectrum. It sounds like you need to consult a pediatric neurologist to get an official diagnosis. If you have consulted a developmental pediatrician, but I prefer a neurologist who has dealt with kids on the spectrum. My son grew out of his hand flapping (he only did this when he got extremely upset). He still makes fleeting glances to my eyes, but needs to be prompted to do so. I hope this helps. It seems like a lot of people have responded to your posts. Good luck and whatever you do, get him tested ASAP and get therapies right away! The sooner the better the outcome!

[deleted account]

I don't have alot of time to reply, but just to say that I am on some kind of developmental delay road with my daughter - it has been a ride. I just want to say that you and anyone else looking for causes to their child's DD... look into toxicity. My daughters lead levels are off the chart - I got a hair analysis done. I think this is contributing to her odd behaviour. Good-luck and get a naturopath if you can.

Lourdes - posted on 03/08/2011

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Hi Natasha! I am no Autism specialist, just a mom of a almost 6 year old boy diagnosed with Autism. He was just 15 month old when I suspected something was wrong because he developed no language. He started speaking at 3 1/2 years old. What really helped was searching for a DAN doctor...we live in Guatemala City so we had to travel to California to Dr. Robert Sears. We are so glad that we did!!! even if it was expensive for the whole family to travel. You can find him in FB, he has a page there, you can contact him there. He goes to a regular school with a shadow teacher but he is learning both in spanish and english. He still has things to overcome but he is so much better now!!! my advice is do not wait for a diagnosis, there is so much you can do ahead...do not waste any time, good luck!

Jennifer - posted on 03/08/2011

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My son had a speech delay and did some of the flapping and spinning in circles. I was pretty sure that there was nothing wrong, because he was very outgoing, smiled, and made eye contact. I put him in speech therapy at age 2. Come to find out, he is high functioning autism. It benefitted him a lot from me starting him out at such an early age. You should get him into therapy as soon as possible.

Allison - posted on 03/08/2011

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You do NOT have to wait. Find a good DAN doctor in your area. DAN (defeat autism now) Doctors are a parents best ally. My son was 2 when diagnosed. It may not be autism, but just a developmental delay and the state is required to help provide services like speech or OT. Trust your instincts. No matter how hard the diagnosis will be to hear, the earlier you tackle it, the better outcome for your son. Good luck and have strength.

Natasha - posted on 03/08/2011

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Oh wow that is considered sensory? oh okay so things like that, is that considered a fairly normal sensory that most kids have? I'm still having trouble understand sensory as such, and which things are really an issue, when he does spin I find he must be stressed, or he does things where he runs around stiff armed, but back and forth on a path type of thing. But no idea why he randomly does those things :(..I know something must be making him unhappy..that or he's bored*sigh*

Katherine - posted on 03/08/2011

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That's great that his hearing is good and you went to a speech therapist.

My son doesnt like the feeling of certain things, and hateees when his hands get dirty or slimeey. His hands go stiff straight and feet , I have no idea what to do when comes to eating any more :(

That's sensory. Perfect example.

Jo - posted on 03/07/2011

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I would look into getting therapies for your son. Even IF he doesn't ever get a diagnosis of a PDD, it wont hurt to have him working on some of these issues. My friends son was diagnosed at 2 and she'd had him in therapy for six months already. Parents know when something is different about their child.

My daughter doesn't have a "formal" diagnosis (still trying to figure out where to start since we just moved to a new area). At 18 months, we were talking to her doctor about her. She didn't talk, make eye contact, point, or play "correctly". Watching my son (who is now 18 months) it's a lot easier to see what his sister SHOULD have been doing. Instead of attempting to do her puzzles, she would line all the pieces across the floor, or stack them in a tower, and have an awful fit if you tried to pick them up. I had to take them away because it was so bad when she would get the "alphabet" puzzles out. Three puzzles times 26 letters leaves a huge issue across the living room floor lol. As she grew things got worse, she became more volatile in her fits. Those can happen on a whim and for no reason apparent to us. She's just turned 5 and has been in speech therapy/ OT for about 8 months now with huge improvements in tactile areas and speech. She still has a great deal of echolalia but she can actually form spontaneous thought if you give her enough time to process the information. She covers her ears when she hears loud noises, and when my son cries, she has a panic attack.

The best thing YOU can do for your son is to be his advocate. It's an interesting thing to say since I never really understood it until my daughter got her IEP for "autistic-like characteristics of behavior"... People told me she'd grow out of it. "Tantrums are normal", "Every child develops differently", and "It'll go away on it's own" are not the things a parent wants to hear, or should hear, when they voice a concern about their child to a doctor. I was ignored when she was two, at three she saw a speech therapist, but was evaluated at a "37", "40" would have given her speech therapy. I was told to "come back when she's four if the problem still persists". At four she was given her IEP. Don't let them make you feel stupid, or uninformed, or like you're overreacting. They don't spend nearly the amount of time with your child as you do. Go for a second, third, fourth opinion if you need too. Rest when you are comfortable with the information you have received.

Tania - posted on 03/07/2011

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also some of the symptoms listed below are not always there as every child with any sort of autism is very different , the spectrum is very broad

Tania - posted on 03/07/2011

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my son has autism and he would play like this not respond to me at all , firstly get a hearing test done to see that he can hear you then if hes hearing is ok then go from there , i did notice a few things in the clip but i suggest start with hearing test . also most children have selective hearing only respond when they want to , but i do understand where your coming from and at least your accepting there may be something there , just go with ur motherly instincts , also if you see a doctor or specialist and you still think something is wrong make it loud and clear you are your sons advocate and the best one at that , good luck

Natasha - posted on 03/05/2011

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And no he doent line up toys, well he does..but not obsessively just if i put out a ton of cars he'll line them up, and use one at the end of the line to push the rest ( I think he thinks its like trains tomas the train?)

Natasha - posted on 03/05/2011

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:O How old is your child that was diagnosed virginia? They were like this? Like he seems fairly "normal" he isn't consntaly spinning or things like that..He sometimes understands, and he understands no, but it's just his eye contact. Even so they are still on Autism spectrum? When did he start speaking?XD

Thanks very much for replying you two!

Do you think I should just wait till she (dr) will see him in 3 months (when he's 2) or should i want to see her sooner? I guess I should be patient, she says theres not much she can say till 2 ( at his 18 month appointment)

I just really want to know now. Like I see a lot of things he does but it's not the extreme or all the time..Somedays I think he's has it for sure! others I'm like maybe not..

Katherine - posted on 03/05/2011

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There is no way to tell from that video. Although it seems like he isn't attending at all to you. Did I see toys lined up? I would get an evaluation asap if you are that concerned. Early intervetion is always the best thing to do.

If he is hand flapping (a sign) and spinning in circles and has delayed speech that is another sign.

Here are some symptoms:

* Deficits in social behavior:

* Impairment in nonverbal communication: Some of the impairments in nonverbal communication accompanying PDD-NOS are:

1. These children don't copy their parents to the extent the children without PDD-NOS.
2. They do a number of activities without any accompanying facial expressions. For instance, they may develop the gesture of pulling adults or parents but without any expression on the face.
3. They generally don't participate in games and activities that require imitation.
4. With growing years when the children are in middle and late childhood, they are able to understand other people's gestures though they themselves don't use gestures.
5. The children with PDD-NOS "are able to show joy, fear, or anger, but they may only show the extreme of emotions." However, no facial expressions accompany these emotions.

* Impairment in understanding speech: Impairments in understanding speech by children with PDD-NOS has some of the characteristics like:

1. Children or persons with PDD-NOS having mental retardation may not be able to ever develop the ability of speech.
2. Children with a less severe PDD-NOS may be able to follow simple speech if accompanied by suitable gestures. For example, telling someone to bring the newspaper while pointing to the newspaper may be understood by such children.
3. Mostly, the affected children fail to understand and comprehend the real meaning of humor or sarcasm or common sayings, etc.

* Impairment in speech development:

* Unusual patterns of behavior: Unusual pattern of behavior include the following:

1. Resistance to change: The affected child feels highly distressed at the slightest change. For instance, minor changes in regular routines may lead to tantrums or the child becomes very sad if lines of toys or objects created by them is disturbed.
2. Ritualistic or compulsive behaviors: These behaviors involve rigid routines like insistence on having same foods, or repetitive acts like hand flapping. Some children become obsessed with certain tasks, like memorizing weather data, state capitals, etc.
3. Abnormal attachments and behaviors: Sometimes, some children may develop attachments to odd objects like batteries or pipe cleaners. Some children may develop infatuation with features like texture or the color of certain articles of their choice.
4. Unusual responses to sensory experiences: Many children with PDD-NOS may "seem underresponsive or overresponsive to sensory stimuli." Thus, they may be mistaken to be deaf or dumb at times. Some of them may act in a different way - liking the rough touch to gentle caressing or selecting foods in a very restrictive way or taking foods from a wide variety.

* Disturbance of movement: The motor skills of the affected children may be delayed but are generally within the acceptable normal ranges. They may be overactive at younger ages and may become less overactive in adolescence. They may "exhibit characteristics such as grimacing, hand flapping or twisting, toe walking, lunging, jumping, darting or pacing, body rocking and swaying, or head rolling or banging." Sometimes, such activities appear occasionally while in some cases, they are being exhibited over a period of time.

* Intelligence and Cognitive Deficits:

* Associated features: Some children affected with PDD-NOS may have the emotional expression that may be "flattened, excessive, or inappropriate to the situation." For instance, they may scream or cry without any reason while at times they may giggle or laugh hysterically. Sometimes, they may ignore the real dangers like moving vehicles or the possibility of falling from heights, while may get scared of harmless object like a particular stuffed animal.

Virginia - posted on 03/05/2011

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I have twins with pdd/nos and this description totally sounds like one of them.they were diagnosed at 2 and a half years old

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