Signs/Symptoms of Aspergers....

Amanda - posted on 05/31/2010 ( 19 moms have responded )

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It has recently been brought to my attention that my 5 y/o may have aspergers...is there anyone out there that may be able to give me some definitive signs/symptoms. From what I have read on the internet and heard from health professionals it would be best to definitely have him tested....I am so scared and nervous about this.... Please help me if you can.

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Julie - posted on 06/11/2010

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My son was diagnosed with Aspergers when he was 7, after I told the doctors (listing my reasons).
Firstly he never ever slept from the age of about 3 weeks, it was as if he was always "bored". This lead to constant crying.
He always lined up his toys/ teddy bears in an exact order on his bed.
He was utterly frustrated at nursery and used to come home and destroy his bedroom (throwing furniture around, including the wardrobe and bunk bed).
From an early age, probably about 2 he would clean everything in site especially the stairs wall (Young children never use the banister) and while cleaning he would chunter away to himself about how "it was about time that those other children would learn to use the banister, this is ridiculous!" and becoming fixated on the hoover.
He would ignore people who were wearing black (I later found out that too many black things cause him to have a bad day), how ever would chat away like "a wise old man" to anyone wearing red.
From the age of about 4. He would take things apart to work out how they worked, and kept a small box containing springs and batteries under his pillow, from said items.
He asked questions about everything, and would not accept a simple answer, and would elaborate as the questions were answered.
He taught himself to read, and by the time he was 5 he had read every book in the infants and the adjoining primary school. However he was very obnoxious and frustrated that the other children in his class (in his words) "had not made enough of an effort, as they should have learned to read by now, so I don't have to read the teachers books to them".
He prefers the company of adults he can have a proper conversation with.
Both us as parents, and his teachers sometimes felt as though he lived in a "bubble", and when he was 6 he said he would like to jump on a hedgehog and burst the bubble he felt he was living in.
We moved house before he was 6, and about a month after we moved he was so stressed with the change he tried to run away from home at 6 in the morning, unlocking the back door, because he couldn't unlock the front door, and tried to take the car with him. When we saw him at 6.30 coming back down the garden path telling his dad how cold it was. He had the mirrors adjusted, the seat adjusted the keys in the ignition and switched on, and the car in gear! He had not turned the key far enough to turn over the engine, however seeing that the problem seemed electrical he moved the fuses in the fuse box around.

He doesn't like change, needs to know the time (however ticking clocks send him mad!) He lives by his watch.
William would rather read a factual book, than a fictional one, because he NEEDS to know everything!
He has certain rituals he has to stick to, for instance he must have a kiss and cuddle from me and his dad before bed or he can't sleep. He cannot wear black trousers with black socks, red and yellow are fantastic colours, always lucky.
He doesn't like noisy situations as he can't "think" and "thinking" is what William does best.

I hope that some of these things help you. Once we managed to get a diagnosis after year of being told I was just a paranoid mother it was like a weight had been lifted, and it also helped William as he was aware that something was not right.

Best Wishes,
Julie

Catherine - posted on 11/14/2011

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it took many years to get my now almost 13 year old to get a diagnosis as she didn't "fit" into anyone category...but finally they agreed on asbergers and capd we went from tourettes to odd to adhd to autism....but they are all on the spectrum. It didn't change anything once we knew, except explain her actions and reactions and gave us a place to start helping her to succeed in the real world. She is loving on her terms, cannot stand change and everything has to be structured, she is fixated on dogs and can tell you anything about any breed. she is extremly hyper sensitive to noise and tactile and routines , she has to have "even" numbers of hugs and kisses and has to be rocked at night before bed. Cannot do anything out of routine unless we give her notice. The biggest thing i can tell you is never give up on your child you know what is their normal and fight for them. My daughter is now making A's in school but only has 2 friends as socially and emotionally she is way behind.God says to love unconditionally and that is what you have to do...it is NOT the end of the world, it is the Beginning of a new understanding of who they are and what they can accomplish in their life with your love and support.

Melanie - posted on 11/07/2011

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Many of these things apply to my 8 year old son, but he is brilliant (not just being a proud parent) he will teach adults how to defrag the hard drive of their computers on line and does not ever get grades below an A. Can any of you tell me what kind of help specifically that your children are getting. We don't need it academically, but he doesn't relate to children his own age and asks a million questions that I am not capable of answering. I adore his quirkiness, but don't want to avoid getting him help if he needs it. Please share your experiences with the type of help that you are getting.

Susan - posted on 06/08/2010

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My son is also 5 and his diagnosis of aspergers was confirmed last week. I was convinced it was developmental delay due to a traumatic birth and he would catch up. I wanted the test to prove he wasn't asperger! Saying that, now that I have a diagnosis I know what I am dealing with, I can learn with him the strategies to cope and make his life as easy and normal as possible. I'd go for the test, don't be nervous, it can only help one way or the other.

User - posted on 06/03/2010

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Hi Amanda,

Aspberger's syndrome falls within the family of autism spectrum disorders.

Typically a child with aspberger's sounds "like a little professor." They tend to have advanced verbal skills, but due to the autism aspect of the syndrome they might seem fixated on a topic that they want to talk about ALL THE TIME. Typically a child with a.s. has difficulties if things "don't go their way." Anything unexpected, out of the routine, will send them into a meltdown. They have a hard time seeing anything from another's point of view, and don't follow social cues. They often appear isolated from their peers.

The trouble with autism spectrum disorders is that no two children are alike. So, when you ask for definitive signs/symptoms...you can only get answers like well, usually we see this, or sometimes we see this. There is no symptomology because it is not a physical illness...it is a neurological disorder that impacts socialization and communication skills.

It is typical to be scared and nervous, but a diagnosis of aspberger's is no the end of the road for your child. It is a tool that will help you to help your child navigate a very different path than his "neuro-typical" peers.

Find a local support group. Get informed, and be the best mom you can be to your little boy!

It is better to find out now and get the supports in place than bang your head against the wall for the next four years.

Good luck.

Sheila

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19 Comments

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Lisa - posted on 12/23/2011

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I have been told by teachers and others that my son may have Aspergers. I have been trying to get help in getting him diagnosed one way or another, but have has no luck. I have tried contacting the autism group, but not heard from them. My pediatrician is no help either. During the summer I haad a survey completed by his teacher and me and have heard nothing. The dr said that they were looking into it. Can anyone tell me what I need to do next?

Joanne - posted on 11/08/2011

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My son is 13 and has it..he got diagnosed at 9...he gets fixated on one subject and lives breatgs and dreams it till eventually he will start with simething else.he finds it hard to maintain and start friendships...can be very immature. however on the plus side he is very loving and excellent at creating.drama and it..he is doing great at school in his lessins and in general is a very happy teenager..i no he will do great in lufe in whatever he puts hus mind too.the thing that i find the hardest is his lack of friends...however he goes to scouts and air cadets...dont panic or get upset bout yoyr son be proud of him and life will be good jo xx

Dawn - posted on 11/07/2011

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no need to be scared, it will later benefit your child long into adulthood. I have a 18yr old son who was just recently diagnosed. I have know since he was an infant that he was uniquely different.I also have a 11 yr old son who is strongly beginning to show the signs. These two boys are my oldest and my youngest of 4 children. Knowing early will hopefully save you much confusing anguish and headache. Test your child. It will open other doors to them which otherwise may have been unavailable.

Dawn - posted on 06/19/2010

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I agree , have him tested. And aspergers is not the end of the world. Many famous people have had it or probably had it and many do not get diagnosed until they are well into adulthood. Aspies can with assistance have a great successful life.

Anne - posted on 06/19/2010

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Hi Amanda, I too was scared and upset when it was pointed out to me by the school earlier this year that my son may have Aspergers. We now have him in the system for assessment and I feel so much better about it now because we know we are doing the best for our son and if he is, indeed, diagnosed with Aspergers we know that a whole load of channels will open up for us to get him the help and therapies that he will need. We are being very positive as he has an intelligence beyond his years and we just need find ways to help our son use his gift in the best way possible.

Sharmin - posted on 06/11/2010

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Please have him tested!!! The sooner the better. If he is in public school, they can get him the help he needs. I am in a little 2 AA School District but they know their stuff and can help you before he starts school and all the way until he turns 21!!! (special ed. program) It is sooooo worth it. My daughter is now 16 and she is getting what she needs. The school is so helpful and understanding.

Amanda - posted on 06/10/2010

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Thank you so much for the warm wishes and wonderful info. Yesterday was a meeting with a bunch of people from the school, and they did ANOTHER one of those questionnaires, and according to that, and the school psychologist, he has mild to moderate aspergers...I've decided God has a plan for us, and A LOT of trust in his father and I, and we'll get through it. God bless you all, and yes, I have found that he brings so much joy to my life.....

Jennifer - posted on 06/10/2010

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Like the one lady said, I don't think there are any one set of symptoms to go by. And I too could leave Emma in one spot to play and go clean, and a couple hours later, she'd still be there, playing with the same toys. She had no desire to crawl or move. My daughter has facial twitches, can't understand social cues, has no clue that people around here have feelings or wants and needs. She's kinda like in her own little bubble as far as that goes. She can be totally aloof, in the clouds. She used to rock back and forth a lot, and be obsessive about lining up her toys, no matter what they were! It was kinda funny some days to walk into her bedroom and see all of the Barbie shoes all lined up! Or maybe rocks she had picked up outside! Her doctor told me she was just lazy. I heard that a lot. She didn't walk on time, she didn't hold her bottle, she didn't want to breastfeed, etc...It just turned out that she was an Aspie girl! Even now she doesn't like wearing some fabrics because of the way they feel. There are some sensations that she just does not like! Certain sounds, touches, etc... But don't be scared or nervous. Your son is still your son and he will bring you much joy! May I suggest finding a group of other mothers of Aspie children to visit with from time to time. I think that will help a lot. You don't feel so alone in the world! LOL. God bless you and your son!

Nancy - posted on 06/09/2010

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I went to the computer myself after years of trying to figure out why my son doesn't exhibit emotional responses. Up came the term "Aspergers" I do not know where to get my son tested for this either but so badly need to. His teachers,(13 yrs old) think he just doesn't care.If you know anything about it, please let me know. (my son was a preemie-27 wks-1 lb. 3 oz.)

Wendy - posted on 06/07/2010

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My granddaughter also has aspberger's, she is loving, when it is on her terms. Emma cannot tell what the temperature of water is, so we have to be careful so she doesn't burn herself, or get very cold hands. Structure plays a big part in our lives now, because other wise it is very confusing for her. So shower is at 8:30 pm. Bedtime is at 9:30 pm. Breakfast at 8:30 am, lunch at 12, supper at 6. You get the message, very structured. If I want to take her shopping I start telling her a few days ahead, that way it doesn't upset her, but we still follow the same routine. I find it is working well for her. She spends lots of time on her own, not with her friends, because she has to have things her way all the time. She loves affection, but on her terms and her time. Having been dx with as is not the end of the world, just a beginning to a new one.

Enjoy your a s child, they bring a new meaning to life.

Wendy

Amanda - posted on 06/05/2010

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I heard Temple Grandin interviewed once and she said the main difference between Asperger's and straightforward autism is the speech delay. Because she had a speech delay, she was diagnosed as autistic -- whereas a child with an Asperger's diagnosis might even be an early talker or "hyper-verbal" as Sheila was describing.

Social difficulties, "stimming" (repetitive behaviors that seem to calm the child), obsessing over a subject or object, and an inability to control emotions when things are "out of order" might be some of the signs.

As recommended by others, I suggest getting him tested and into therapy, as there really is no downside to treatment, even if your test comes back inconclusive. A diagnosis will insure that you can demand certain supports for your child in school should he need them -- not to mention services like speech, occupational or behavior therapy, depending upon his needs.

I wish you all the best and look forward to hearing how he's doing.

Amanda
Blogging for Billy at www.AmandaBroadfoot.com

Bonnie - posted on 06/05/2010

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My son is on a waiting list to see a developmental/behavioral pediatrician to get his diagnosis. I know he has it. He rocks and hums to calm himself when upset, or just falling to sleep. Flaps his fingers sometimes while concentrating on schoolwork. Cannot understand social signals, to join in playing with other kids, or understand jokes, facial expressions, and sarcasm. He didn't like lots of noises and lights as a baby, and into Kindy. Has meltdowns over things that most people wouldn't at his age. Very blunt in talking with people. Loves, loves, loves anything to do with the color green. Has other developmental delays, that are improving with speech therapy and special ed help in school. Don't be nervous, just go get informed. Speak with your child's pediatrician about referral to a developmental/behavioral pediatrician for diagnosis and treatment ideas. Getting in touch with other parents with kids who have the same diagnosis helps too. So many great ideas. Autism Speaks is a great group to get involved with as well.

Anita - posted on 06/04/2010

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my son is 8 when he was 4 he was dx with adhd and odd since then he has just been dx with aspergers then dx doesn't change who they are it helps you to understand them,my son loves the colour red doesn't look people in the eyes and get fixated on certain toys and that is all he plays withand plays the x box none stop,socially he gets along with people if he can use them in his game but only will play it his way and yells out "look at that fat lady" even when i've told him it isn't nice and shouldn't say it he goes but she is mum look at how fat she is.. i can't change that but i'm working on him only whispering it so no one eslse hears him..

Karen - posted on 06/04/2010

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Josh didn't have the "typical" flapping but he "shook" his head ALL the time like he was always saying no and he would opend and shut a squeeky cubbard till by bestfriend would have a anxiety attack (funny to watch) but I think the Most common report from every parent I know ( even add adhd parents I've met is that their kid fixated on something (their cars, their blue toys, their books and played or attended that thing for an OUTRAGEOUSLYl long time. I got to cleaning the house one day when Ja was 1 1/2 and I suddenly realise I havn't heard from Ja in HOURS. I FREEKED OUT started screeming running around the neighborhhod calling the cops and upsetting the neighbors only to find josh RIGHT where I had left him putting the shapes in the box and dumping them out. I had to go to therapy cause what kinda Mom LOSES her kid where she sit him but that was LONG time ago and he was my first child. Needless to say NO ONE believed me my 1 1/2 yr old sat their for 3 hrs without walking off or making a peep so they thought I was sleeping or drunk or something and luckily you could still smell the cleaning stuff or they were going to arrest me for neglect. (Ja was sitting in a dirty diaper and got a BAD diaperash) but he was still just trying to sit and play with his shapes while I was loseing my mind, trying to clean him up and talk to child services. WHAT a nightmare. LoL And all my friends would tell me how LUCKY I was that he was such a "good" and "quiet" boy. Once I got his diagnosis though and we learned what to do he started getting good grades and he's doing GREAT now at 11.

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