They think my 3.5 year old son has PDD. I need HELP!

Sarah - posted on 12/15/2009 ( 26 moms have responded )

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I am new to circle of moms and I have 2 kids. My son and my daughter whose 5. My son is 3.5 and they think he has PDD. He is seeing a therapist every week. He is almost 4 and I have not seen a change in his behavior at all since 2 years old. He melts down really easily over petty stuff like, not wanting to share or his tie laces on his shoes are wrong. He will throw major tantrums and kick or throw stuff around even at school. He spits in public and hits as well. He does not want to participate in school activities or free art. He excessively washes his hands at school. He plays alone all of the time. He stacks toys up or lines them up and has repetitive movements as in going up the slide the same way all of the time. I just need some advice. Do you really think it's PDD or something else?

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Lydia - posted on 12/21/2009

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Hi..I feel your pain, I also have 2 kids. My son is 16 and my daughter is 5...My 16 yr old son was diagnosed with PDD at the same age as your son. First of all, get him to a neuroligist asap for an MRI and a EEG, to rule anything out. PDD is a form of Autism and my child pretty much acted the same way minus the spitting and not as much of the trantrums. What I suggest you do get him evaluated by an Autism specialist to get him an actual diagnosis because waiting to see what happens should not be an option. You need to know for show so you can get the proper treatment and therapy. My son went through a lot I raised him by myself and I didn't even know what Autism was back then, so I know he missed out on alot of help. I did my best in raising him and as I started to learn about PDD I started getting him all the help that was out there that they don't advertise and now my son is 16 in high school and going to graduate next year. He still has his challenges but let me tell you when he puts on that cap and gown there is not going to be a dry eye...I know you have a long rough road ahead with your son, but if you get him the proper help, have patience, and just always be there for him it will all be worth it at the end...trust me...Good luck!

Sheila - posted on 12/16/2009

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I think I would be looking for a developmental pediatrician...someone familiar with the full autism spectrum. PDD, or PDD-NOS...it is a spectrum diagnosis regardless of the letters.

What is the therapy? OT/behaviour/speech?

Does your son hand flap? Twitch his fingers repetitively, make low rumbling sounds? How are his verbal skills? Receptive/expressive language? Did he meet the expected milestones within the typical timeframe, or were there delays?

I couldn't take my son out and about when he was two until three, or if I did it was so horribly awful that I would end up in tears. I learned from the OT that he has sensory integration disorder...so the noise level, the movement of people, the inability to process all of these incoming signals caused him such anxiety that he would scream from the overload.

My son NEVER played with other children, he was always alone. In fact, this past month of so, his teacher sent a picture home of him playing with another child. It has been a long time coming and I cried tears of joy. It is not that he DOES NOT want to play with others, it is that he can't. He has no idea what other children will do next, and this inability to anticipate their actions would cause him anxiety.

My son lined everything up, or stacked in perfectly formed little pyramids...or he grouped by colour.

When you write, they are trying to see what happens, who are "They" the school staff?

Anxiety is the result of something else....not the root.

I don't know your son, I have never observed your son. So, it is challenging to give a fully informed opinion.

However, you are describing a child whose world is shrinking. You cannot take him out into the community without major trauma (and it is a trauma) He is not having a positive school experience, and in fact is withdrawing from activities that a typical child would enjoy. He is socially isolated and appears to be engaging in ritualistic hand-washing. He demonstrates repetitive movements, and lines up his toys. He is easily frustrated and his "tantrums" go beyond what you consider to be typical.

If he were my son, I would be getting him to a developmental pediatrician.

Do I think it is PDD? No, I don't. It sounds like autism. Do I think there is a huge difference between PDD and Autism? No, I don't. If autism is on a scale, or a spectrum, we start with 1 and go up to 100. A one on the scale is someone a little quirky, but that's about it. 100 is a non-verbal child who engages in self-injurious behaviours, is often aggressive and demonstrates most traits. PDD just means fewer traits are evident so maybe they are at a 60...but it is still a spectrum disorder that needs to be addressed in the same manner.

I don't mean to be cold. But as parents, we have to sometimes be very methodical and look at the facts. If he was a friend's child, what would you think if you saw the behaviours you have described, knowing that he has a sibling that acts in a typical manner?

I am methodical, but I am passionate and I don't believe in wasting time. Time is on your side when your child is young. Early intervention is the key, and waiting accomplishes nothing. It is a slippery slope, and the longer essential therapies are put off, the further down they go.

You wouldn't have written if you weren't concerned. Take action and get him to someone who will drop the wait and see attitude. The sooner you get answers, the sooner you can help your child.

Good luck....and please know that I am sincere in my hopes that your child will get the help that he needs.

Sheila

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Sarah - posted on 01/10/2010

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Thank you for the advice from you guys. Jacob just saw the neurologist this past week and he is such a weirdo. He told me that Jacob's brain is disorganized and he is going to be the next Dr. Seuss and I need to allow him to blossom because he is so smart. What in the world is this guy talking about. I had found out that this doc tells everyone the same "Termanology" which is Disorganized brain. Jacob's mental health therapist had qualified him for TBS which is Therapeutic Behaviorial Services but I am not sure when it's going to start. They will be going out to his pre-school and the home to help with his behaviour. Which is really good. They still haven't given us a mental health diagnosis yet. Not sure when they will either. He is a smart boy and I love him to death along with his sister,

Angela - posted on 01/07/2010

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(((HUGS))) You may want to try a different doc. Just because he doesn't act up in the doc's office doesn't mean he is not autistic. It may mean that the doc office is a calming place for him for some reason. My son is on the ASD spectrum... I got him re-diagnosed this last year... they added ADD and major sensory issues, But I have not seen a report yet.

Tell your son to spit in the sink. Funny but it worked with my child. Tell him what he can do. Forget about what he can not do...it works great. My son has transition issues,,, sounds like your son does to. Shopping is horrible. If you have to just leave the store... and ignore all teh comments from every. What does your gut say. That is what you have to listen to,,, my daughter is doing things now and my dh doesn't think much of it... my son made these same noises... I am watching,,, I have her on a list to get tested also for autism,,, but I think it is sensory seeking,

Doris - posted on 01/07/2010

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Please dont be afraid, practically all of us live with dormant diceases, my son was diagnosed with PDD it is a mild form of aspergers. Your discribtion of your childs behavior is very simuliar to my sons, you NEED an at home ABA, what he or she does is works with your child alone to bring them, for lack of better words, into our world. The lack of social skills are indeed the major problem with PDD I say this because without mimicing ie, abc's, following directions etc. it is hard to teach them, wether it is to stop spitting etc. the ABA will help with this, your child also needs a speech therapist, a physcial therapist and an OT occupational therapist, ie holding of spoons, forks etc. Starting now at an early age is great. To Answer your question, YES, will all do our children unfortunately due do our governments experiments were unable to kill, adjust or work out of their systems these imperfections so that is what professional therapist helps our children to do, is to not allow that PDD get a perminant hold on our kid. Dont be afraid We Have To Be Our Childrens Advocates

Sarah - posted on 12/21/2009

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I'm sorry go to youtube and look in the search engine and type in Sarahluvsadrian805

Sarah - posted on 12/21/2009

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Thank you guys for all of your help. He throws tantrums when he can't do something on his own like untie his shoes,not sit in the cart at the store,to me it's petty stuff but to him it's a big deal. The doctors keep telling me that there is nothing wrong with him because he talks,he smiles so they said how can he have Autism or even be on the spectrum? Jacob did not talk until he was about 2 years old and the therapist at Behaviorial Health said that he cannot have Autism because when kids have Autism they don't have a speech delay and like I told her there is mild and severe maybe my son is "high functioning" but I don't know because they don't know. Jacob was also behind in fine motor skills and gross motor skills when he was younger but at his preschool they said that he has a 30% delay in gross motor skills but he's not really behind. When he is at preschool the teachers has mentioned to me that Jacob does not like to engage in fine art and he does not like to get his hands dirty. He also goes up and down the slide the same way each and every time. His favourite thing to do is stack up blocks or play in the playhouse where you can pretend to cook. He does not play with anybody and would rather be alone OR he will allow the kids to sit by him and play with their own set of blocks but when they take Jacob's blocks he will throw a raving fit. He does not like circle time. So to me this is red flags of "something" that is going on with him. I literally have videos of him going into different meltdown's here and there. Look up Jacob and you all can watch them on youtube and tell me what you think. Thank you

Julie - posted on 12/20/2009

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Sarah, I read your post and it reminded me of the tough times with my son. He was diagnosed with Aspbergers. but not until he was 7. From 3 to 7 was really difficult, despite the multiple times we had him evaluated 'inconclusively'.
I agree with the posts below. Have your son evaluated immediately. The earlier the intervention the better for him and your family.
Investigate behavior modification techniques for autism. (I read 'Aspbergers and Difficult Moments' and 'Parenting your Aspbergers Child' that truly helped. Find the website for your local autism foundation or autism speaks.org.).
Find an occupational therapist who works with children who have sensory integration or autism focus. They will help with the behavior modification. Look for a pattern in your sons behavior...starting with the biggest issues first and focus on those: what triggers a tantrum,what is his reaction, how big is his reaction? When you start looking for a pattern, you will see one. When your child is having a big reaction/tantrum, he's trying very hard to tell you something. You just have to figure out what he's saying. Children on the spectrum just don't understand their enviroment around them, what to do, how to play with a toy or a person,what is expected of them. They stay in their fantasty world, which is predictable and safe. Good Luck!

Debbie - posted on 12/20/2009

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Get to a good pediatrician that specialized in PDD/Autism as soon as you can. Children's Hospital is also a good place to start, if there is one near you. But above all, continue to work with him, treating him like a "normal" child, and expect him to act properly in public. The more you reinforce these behaviors the better he will be able to cope in the long run.

Sarah - posted on 12/20/2009

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Morning Sharon,
WOW thank you for all your help. My son does see a Therapist at Mental Health and he does see a Behaviorial Pediatrician but she's on Medical leave until Feburary and he does see a Neurologist for his head and he will see him again in January but the Neurologist had said that he does not see Autism in my son and I said what am I supposed to do with him when he acts like this as I was describing the behaviours to him. He was such a jerk towards us. He had said to us that my son's brain is disorganized.....? What all that means I do not know. I just want to know what all is wrong with him. Thanks and have a good day :)

Sharon - posted on 12/20/2009

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You do have some of the red flags of autism going on. Either a developmental pediatrician or a neurologist familiar with autism can help with a proper diagnosis. You could contact the Autism Society of America for a recommendation of a specialist in your area. Autism Speaks also has a list of specialists on their website. I would then check with your state's Department of Mental Health for any possible funding streams that might aid your family in some of the costs involved in therapies that could help your son.

It sounds like you would then need to talk with a behavior therapist about his behavior issues. You would want to find a board certified behavior analyst (BCBA) that can do what's called a functional behavior assessment (FBA) on your son to understand the triggers behind some of these behaviors. This would be used at his school to create a behavior intervention plan (BIP) to help the staff understand the best ways to respond to these behaviors. You could look up bcba certification on google to help find a therapist in your area. If it is PDD/Autism, once you have a diagnosis, you would then need to let his school know and ask for an education assessment as well. In my state, the medical diagnosis does not mean you automatically have the educational services that help our kiddos most.

GOOD LUCK!

Sarah - posted on 12/19/2009

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Hello Sheila,
Yeah I don't know. It's so frustrating when you have no idea what's wrong with your child you know. Thank you so much for your opinions and ideas. Yeah Jacob insist on having everything with a button on it. He's not much for long sleeves as he will wear them but not very often. He hates the tags too. I buy most of his things tagless.

Sheila - posted on 12/19/2009

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Hi Sarah,

It sounds like "strong pants" means pants with a heavier density. This sounds like a sensory issue. Light cottony shorts might feel horrible to him. My son has issues between seasons when we change from pants to shorts, then shorts to pants. He prefers short sleeves to long sleeves because he doesn't like cuffs. His socks can't be tight (this means I can't touch his toes when his socks go on...) If your son prefers heavier weight fabrics it might be that lighter fabrics feel horrible...like ants crawling on you skin. My son can also not tolerate tags on his clothing. When he was younger, I would have to struggle to dress him because he hated clothing. His uniform was track pants and a t-shirt.

Water touching the face can be similar in sensation to the light materials he avoids. Also, water splashing is completely unpredictable which also leads to heightened anxiety. Not only does it hit your face randomly, it then starts to trickle down...again, think of a bug crawling on your face and this is the level of his anxiety.

Children on the spectrum (PDD included) can feel a heightened anxiety if their hands are dirty/sticky. Our OT still tries to get my son to engage in messy play, but he will have none of it. In fact, I would say this is the one area where I have seen next to no progress. My son will wash his hands, but it has to be "his way" with no help. He does not like glue, creams, mud, sand...he has unusually clean hands for a five year old.

For handwashing, you might try this
a) give him 10 handwashing passes a day. (or 5, or 15...whatever number works)
b) this does not include handwashing after using the bathroom or for before meals
c) let him know that when his passes are over, he can't wash his hands anymore.
d) he will probably try to use the bathroom more to get handwashing in, but you can monitor that
e) if he wants to handwash and his passes are done, a super positive diversion will be needed....
f) or let him use a baby lotion....something gentle that will help his skin'

I hope this helps!

Sheila



The desire/compulsion to have everything just right (like shoelaces) is a red flag for autism, but it is also possibly OCD related. The same can be said of handwashing.

Sarah - posted on 12/19/2009

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Hello Sheila,
Yeah I know something is not "wired right" with Jacob. I have video tapes of where he was in a meltdown several times and I have not had a chance to let the therapist see it yet. I wanted to mentioned to you that he also does not like the sun he covers his face with his hands and when he's in the shower he uses his hands as a barrier because he does not like the water in his face. He also tells me that he wants to wear "strong pants".....??? He has to wear jeans or jean shorts but they have to have a button on it. He refuses to wear pull on clothes and if I put it on him he throws a fit and goes into a meltdown. He has to wear tie shoes and refuses to wear velcrow shoes and he is so obsessed with his shoe laces that they have to be the same way he tells me and if there not he'll untie them until they are "his right way" He loves the water as in washing his hands a million times a day. His hands are washed so much to wear they are really red and raw. Why is he like this?

Sheila - posted on 12/19/2009

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Sarah, they are not just quacks, they are dangerous if they are saying they don't diagnose until 5 or 6. I know children that were diagnosed between the age of one year to eighteen months. An experienced doctor, even an experienced nursery school teacher, knows when there is something "not right." And the most experienced doctor who also values common sense will tell you never to ignore a mother's instinct.

Go with what YOU know to be true and BEST for your child! See if you can videotape (without him noticing) so that you can show the therapist what you are dealing with, what your son is dealing with.

This is going to sound wacky, but do you know any yoga instructors? I know each of my posts are very long, and I tend to throw a lot at you, but DEEP BREATHING is so important. When Jacob is calm, sit with him and his sister and show in through the nose, hold it in your tummy, out through the mouth. Roll your shoulders, shake your arms, wiggle your fingers....These exercises help with self-regulation. They have to be taught when your child is calm They work. If you know anyone who does yoga, or who teaches it, this is an excellent first step because when he starts to escalate, you can try to cut it off with let's breathe, breathe...deep breaths.

Have to go. My son has just started to scream because he can't have a lollipop.

Sheila

Sarah - posted on 12/18/2009

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Hey guys. I live in Southern California and everywhere I turn to it seems to be a dead end. They sit there and tell me he's fine and he is 3.5 and EVERYTHING he's doing is "normal" I just don't know anymore. I strongly believe these doctors out here are quacks. They said that they do not diagnose a child with Autism out here until the child is 5 or 6. I'm like well that can be too late. He needs help now. When he was 2 years old he received services from Tri-counties and Easter Seals because he was so behind in his milestones to where he didn't even know how to play with a shape sorter. The Therapist notified me today that he got an approval from TBS which is Theraputic Behavioral Services to where they going to come out to the home and help me with his behavior. From this point I don't know where to turn for more help... I am not going to give up though.

Niki - posted on 12/18/2009

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Hi, Sheila. I'm new to Circle of Moms in general. This was one of the first communitites I joined. My 8 year-old son has autism and my 10 year-old daughter has PDD-NOS. Your son's behavior sounds a great deal like my son at that age. Like someone elso mentioned, it may have alot to do with sensory issues. He's on overload when he goes out in public. You need to get him somewhere to be officially diagnosed so that he can receive all the help and services he needs. I don't know where you are located, but I took both of my children to the Weisskopf Center in Louisville, KY. If you are nowhere near there, ask their pediatrician where to go. I'm sure they can send you in the right direction. However, be prepared to hear the worst case senario. In Louisville, 5 or 6 different doctors spent less than an hour apiece with each of my kids and told me they would never speak or function on a "normal" level. They both speak well, my son is pretty high functioning and, if you didn't know my daughter's diagnosis, you couldn't tell her apart from any other child.

Sheila - posted on 12/18/2009

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Hi Sarah,

I think one of the most frustrating things for a parent is to have a child who presents in a way that doesn't make sense. As a toddler, my son was very affectionate and loving. I had three separate pediatricians tell me he was perfectly normal, well within the expected parametres, and there is nothing wrong. Every time we got him into a specialist, he would BEHAVE!! I would sit there describing these behaviours, but he would be looking at a book, engaging with the dr and I looked like I was some over-protective mother who didn't have a clue as to what was going on with my own son! It was sooooooo frustrating! Even when he did his final assessment test, he was being perfect until the last ten minutes and then finally he showed all the behaviours that I was concerned abou...now, I have to be clear that he demonstrated other behaviours that they were looking for (far more subtle behaviours) but the last ten minutes locked it down. AND I finally had a pediatrician who had ample experience with spectrum disorder.

I would really look into a new OT. Explain that she probably won't see certain behaviours, because they are reserved for you, but let her know that this is what is happening..(if you have a camera, videotape it and bring it along to the OT and the next dr's visit and the preschool)

I have heard people reference a disorganized brain/or strangled pathways. This is the filing cabinet comparison (disorganized). If you think of everyone's brain as being a filing cabinet, organized A to Z...very structured. So, if someone asks you a question, you go the correct file, pull out the information, and then answer...this all happens in the blink of an eye. A disorganized brain has the same filing cabinet, but someone messed up the files. So, the information is there....it just isn't as easy to find. The more severe the disorder, the more messed up the filing cabinet. So, if you ask what did you do at school, you might hear all about firemen and firetrucks..or something else completely out of the blue.

Is there Dinosaur school in your area? It is a Social Skills program available in Canada and the US. In this area, you contact Community and Social Services preschool division, but I don't know who you would need to contact. It is an absolutely wonderful program, and I have known a number of children who have gone through it.

Until you have a diagnosis, I would be providing as much structure and routine as you can, with built in sensory breaks. Get a little pop-up tent that he can just go and relax in (they fold flat...disney stores often have them with pictures of characters on them...not camping tents).

If he is disobeying you, being defiant...think about what it is exactly you need him to do. Don't use more than four word sentences...very simple directions...eat now, play later. If you get into elaborate discussions, it gives wiggle room for more arguing. During moments of defiance and struggle, the less said the better. Be as direct as you possibly can. As well, and I know this is soooooooooo hard, don't escalate with him. Stay as calm as you can. I have had my son on the floor at the grocery store as he tore at my face and people walked by. I don't want to give anyone any reason to judge me even further than what they already have.

As well, we go to the same stores so the staff know us. It was rare for us to go to new places when he was three. Now, at 5.5 we do have more freedom.

Get an egg timer. If you need him to get ready/leave to go shopping..etc...tell him, when the timer is done, we're going to the car to go shopping. Introduce the timer with something easy like, when the timer is done, I am going to give you a smartie. Teach him that the timer has meaning, and it will help you to move from one activity to the next.

It is hard, and you are at that in-between stage....be strong.

I am wishing you well!

Sheila

Carolynne - posted on 12/18/2009

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My boys have migraines too, and one is diagnosed, Aspergers, and one is Diagnosed PDDNOS.. which I personally disagree with. My son, Keith, seperates skittles by color just so he can eat them. He doesnt have friends, and often struggles in school. He cant ride a bike- not even with training wheels (struggles with both fine and gross motor skills), and freaks out in the store/school performances- even if he isnt involved... and cant eat foods of red or green, and absolutely will refuse to eat if any foods are touching. The best bet is get a second opinion- if you dont agree. Research support groups in you area, the parent outreach programs are free, and a great resource. :0)

Sarah - posted on 12/18/2009

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Good Morning Sheila,
I do have a harness that I used when he was smaller but I have never tried to use it again. As for a stroller he probably won't sit in one as he likes to be the "BIG BOY" type of kid. He had Echolalia when he was about 2 but as for him repeating stuff he'll repeat like his name over and over again or like little simple words. His OT said that since he doesn't act up in her office there is nothing wrong with him and I just can't seem to get through to the docs or therapist's heads. The Developmental pedatrician had me fill out a GARS sheet for Autism and she had scored it and said that at home he is in the 73% for having Autism and then the preschool had filled one out and it has not yet been scored. I'm just confused because I do not have a diagnosis for him so I don't know how to "deal with him" you know what I mean? It's hard for him everyday because I don't know if it's going to be a good day or a bad day for him. No one knows what it's actually like until you have a kid with special needs just like I told the docs and the therapist. The neuroligist said that he gets frequent migranes and they come and go. He said that he might have a migraine today and then not again until 2-3 months down the road. He also said that his brain is disorganized?? Whatever that means I have no idea. He didn't really explain it to us.

Sheila - posted on 12/17/2009

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Echolalia is the repeating of words/phrases. If you ask a child, how was school, they repeat it back...don't answer. Or, they might repeat lines from a tv show/commercial. My son sometimes sounds like a game show announcer because he will repeat exactly what he has heard on a commercial...mommy, would you like some ??? a source of 8 essential vitamins and part of a nutritious breakfast?

It feels like he is doing this deliberately, but he is not. He is wired differently. He does not perceive the world the same as you or I do. He takes in the information, and then it gets scrambled. He is anxious when you are not present because you are his anchor in a world of confusion.

My son's OT once described his anxiety level to me like this: Imagine you are in an underground parking lot, it's midnight, and you think you are alone. Suddenly, you hear a second set of footsteps coming up behind you...this is the level of anxiety that your son faces every day, a dozen times a day. It cannot be reasoned away, you cannot convince him not to be afraid...he just is and it is what it is.

You need a better OT. She was not making progress with your son, but there is an OT out there who will!

With his skull condition, is there the possibility that he has migraines? Or, a constant sense of pressure. This type of discomfort can cause children to act out, especially if they cannot verbalize it properly.

Have you tried using a harness when out. My son responded very well to it, and learned how to walk with me as a result of using it. You still get looks, but not as bad as the meltdown looks.

The next time you are out, if your son goes into meltdown, and people are staring, tell the directly he has developmental issues. Would he let you use a stroller for him?

See if you can get into another pediatrician. A spectrum disorder is neurologically based, and as hard as it is, it is not personal....given a choice, most children will seek to please their caregivers...they want to be accepted and loved. When a neurological disorder is involved, children behave as they do because their wiring is on overload...if they could simply "be good" they would. These children have to LEARN appropriate social behaviours....most of us are taught manners , and how to get along...but it is almost just implied teaching...we do not have formalized structured lessons on what a happy face looks like, what a sad face looks like...children on the spectrum do need this formalized teaching. It takes time and it takes patience....lots and lots and lots of patience.

Good luck to you and JAcob.

Sheila

Sarah - posted on 12/17/2009

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Hello Sheila,
Jacob does see a Developmental peds and she is on medical leave until Feb when we see her again. Jacob has alot of problems at preschool and the babysitter's house. He is so obsessed with washing his hands,obsessed with his shoe laces on his shoes and they have to be the same way or he will flip out yell and scream and untie them until he thinks there "okay". I am only 23 years old and I am so frustrated with these ignorant people out here in Cali. He does not hand flap or rock but he does get really excited over me tying his shoes and when he gets a snack before bed each day he holds his hands kinda bent and moves them up and down and has this big ole smile on his face and I do not know why he does this....?

He also throws these horrible tantrums to where he throws things around the room and will literally clear off your whole table and throw everything on the floor and will not want to pick it up when he's done with his tantrum. I took him the other day to get his glasses he has to wear and he dashed out in front of a car (he has no fear of anything) and I grabbed his arm and explained to him he cannot to that so we proceed to get in the store and he runs off without me so I find him and pick him up and he scream put me down put me down and everyone is looking at me and he's kicking me and he's spitting all over the floor and he slaps me in my face so I'm really mad at this point and this all went on for 45 minutes. I was embarassed but he sure wasn't.

I do not know what triggers these tantrums but when he's always at school or the sitter's house he is always asking "where's my mom?" "When is she coming back?" I have never left him at all up until I started working again. He has severely seperation anxiety and he already went thru it as a baby so I dont know why he's going thru it again. He also had surgery at 3 months old for Craniosynotosis which is where his bones were fused together and his soft spots were closing at a month old. He also talks very low and he mumbles.He repeats stuff all of the time and he is to put it frankly annoying on purpose.

He also has repetitive movements and dashes alot. It's hard to explain. He does sometimes make low rumbling sounds but when he's acting up or we dicsipline him he wants to hide. He was seeing and OT but she feels that it's not helping Jacob so she dismissed him but suggested to the therapist that he needs to have someone come out to the home and to the school to work with him. He talks very well for his age but he did not meet all his milestones as he was delayed. Hope this helps. If you want you can e-mail me at Sarahluvsadrian@aol.com Thanks guys so much -Sarah

Sarah - posted on 12/15/2009

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Thanks for the reply. He does see a therapist every week and they are trying to figure out if it's PDD,ADHD,or Anxiety. They are waiting to see what happens which is crazy. Everytime we take him out in the community he terribly acts up. Yells,screams,hits,spits so bad to where I literally have to pick him up and hold him like a baby and he starts hitting me. I just dont know what to do with this kid. He had surgery at 3 months old for Craniosystosis. My daughter never acted like this.

Rachel - posted on 12/15/2009

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My son was thought to have PDD-NOS at age 3 he was just officially diagnosed as autistic last week and he is now 3.5. Try to get him evaluated ASAP! That's all I can say some of the behaviors do sound like my sons. Lately he's been spitting out of nowhere, major tantrums.. The sooner you diagnose the better! Hope all goes well

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