Verbal Stimming

Shelly - posted on 02/09/2009 ( 16 moms have responded )

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Has anyone been able to curb or eliminate verbal stimming in their child with autism? This is new. He is 3 and has just started this in the last few months. I seriously want to cut my ears off. He never shuts up - but it is all jibberish and noises. He even does it very loudly while falling asleep. It is definately worse when he is tired or stressed. It is really interfering with him being engaged with people and activities. It is making him appear much more affected than he is. We tried gum to keep his mouth busy and that only lasts about 1 minute. I have taken to flicking him in the mouth when he does it. (not hard - it does not hurt him - he just doesn't like the sensation) to try to have him associate it with negative reinforcement.

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Tina - posted on 02/15/2014

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HI Shelly
I am new to the group here, and I wanted to ask you a question that might appear as if I am ignorant, but I really do not know what is TY. I have a son who is almost 5 ys old and does lots of stimming too, so what should i do.

Susan - posted on 02/12/2009

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Is he stimming because he's seeking proprioceptive input?  Try putting him on a swing, using an electric toothbrush, a vibrating device.  These might give him the sensory input he is craving.  Hope this helps.

Shelly - posted on 02/10/2009

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Lena

We are GFCF - Soy Reduced, Nitrate Free, Phenol Reduced, Egg Free. We have not added any new foods. He still uses toddler toothpaste because we cannot get him to spit. So I don't think that is it. I have racked my brain trying to figure out what has caused this to suddenly start and cannot figure it out



Rebekah

Ty is verbal - though limited. He can say I want phrases to get what he wants, he knows his letters, numbers, colors and shapes. Can label few things. Says I Love You. That is about it. I thought about the possibility of this being emerging langauge so I hesitate to curb it - but it is really interfering with his engaging with people and activities. Ty does have major SI issues so I am sure it is related. I just an not sure how else to redirect it to get him what he needs without driving everyone crazy

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16 Comments

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Pamela - posted on 05/21/2012

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oh thank god I found this thread ! my son is 4 and even though he has always jargoned its getting worse with all the noises high pitched grunting, growling. Ive always said if he could just be quite people would just think he was shy. I've noticed it is not as bad when he is out and about and not there are all if he is in a playcentre

Josephine - posted on 03/12/2012

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Hi Shelley--My daughter is currently receiving EI services in the NYC area...she had some functional language that turned into verbal jargon around 22 months of age...i tried for months to get the language back, but realized i was out of my league...then, my son was born when she was 24 months old, so we thought she regressed due to my pregnancy/his birth...we were completely thrown for a loop when she was diagnosed at age 28 with PDD-NOS...i had no idea what that even meant....7 months later,we feel her verbal stimming has increased tremendously ..if you listen closely, she is actually saying things, sometimes entire sentences through all the verbal jargon...she recently began labelling things, knows all her colors, shapes, numbers, alphabet when she is "focused", which makes us even crazier!! how can she hold it together long enough to be learning so much, but has moments that make her look completely autistic!!! we just dont get it!!! she will be 3 at the end of april...we too are losing our minds with all this stimming...



Our OT recently suggested using a hand massager around her TMJ muscle, and around her ears...we only do it as long as she will tolerate it...we recently started this, so we'll see how it goes...maybe its worth a try? my heart goes out to you Shelley...I feel lost and helpless through all of this, and quite frankly, im tired of getting 80 different opinions from 80 different professionals....the bottom line seems to be --try it all and see what sticks...good luck to you...i know i need all the patience and strength i can get!

Susan - posted on 02/13/2009

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Quick tip about oral vibrations: if you find that he's orally defensive with the toothbrush, run down the battery a bit.  Also, something that worked for us is one of those infant toys which you clip on the handle of a car seat that the child pulls down and vibrates back up.  You can put the plastic part in the mouth (that would normally clip on to the carseat handle) and pull it so it vibrates in his mouth.  OR, you can let him pull it and watch it vibrate back up.  Watching the vibrating bug provides proprioceptive input (it makes a "typical" person dizzy).  Catalogues like www.therapro.com offer other products that provide proprioceptive input - like the Z-vibe or the Vibrating Ladybug Pillow - but they are pricey as they are created for durability in a clinical setting.  Sometimes less expensive remedies do the trick at home! 

Shelly - posted on 02/12/2009

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Tyler is proprioceptive seeking. We have an indoor swing for him. I am going to try some oral stimulation with vibration like you suggested and maybe increase swing time as well. As far as the music - he is often auditory defensive - and will not put on earphones but I am going to try again. Thanks for the advise

Semantha - posted on 02/12/2009

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What about a ipod/cd player/music device to play music? I too am grasping at straws here, but I noticed both my sons LOVE music (and other noises) constantly, and when they have picked up my ipod they concentrate so hard on hearing the music that they are quiet. Well, the baby sings alot...ALOT! lol

Susan - posted on 02/12/2009

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Denise,



Denise,



My son's OT suggested there may be a correlation between SI dysfunction and the verbal stims.  The theory goes that the verbal stims create a vibrating sound, which gives the child the proprioceptive input s/he craves.  Parents who find appropriate ways to give the child that proprioceptive input may see a decline in the verbal stims.  Vibrating toothbrushes, vibrating pillows, and swings are some examples of ways to provide proprioceptive input, and there are many other ways.  I find this site to be a wealth of sensory integration information: .comHope that helps.  Susan

Denise - posted on 02/12/2009

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Hi Rebekah,



My son verbal stims a lot. Ever since he was a baby in his crib. Recently he's been doing it so much more, to the exclusion of everything around him. I'm curious about the SI dysfunction. That never occured to me. How did you make the discovery and what can be done about it? Thanks! Denise

Shelly - posted on 02/11/2009

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Actually that is a really good idea. I have been punishing him for doing it by scolding or flicking him but I have not been rewarding him for stopping or being quiet. I am going to try that. Thanks Rebekah.

Rebekah - posted on 02/11/2009

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Will he quiet down for a reward?? Or is he too young yet to accept a 'bribe' I know it sounds hideous, but if I didn't bribe my son I would have gone crazy. My son at that age really loved mini m&m's. I know you mentioned your son is on a restricted diet so maybe there is something he really enjoys. anyway what I would do is not unlike how one trains a puppy and to some that may sound cruel but let's get over the analogy and try and help our children. When you ask him to be quiet or settle or when he just is give him the reward and praise him. After a week my son learned this behaivor and improved on keeping it to a minimum. I'm just grasping straws here for you. Hope you can find something that helps. (hugs)

Rebekah - posted on 02/10/2009

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First question does your child have speech delays and any other form of language? Because at his age he may be trying to verbalize with you along with stimming. My son had only this verbal stimming until age four. I would give him a puppet to verbalize with or I would distract him with various things similar to you, lollipop etc.. Later the stimming behaivor was linked to a SI dysfunction, the need to hear vibrations in the ears. I'm not sure how to help you on this one, but just keep plugging away at different distractions and find one that helps. good luck.

Lena - posted on 02/10/2009

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Shelly, are you able to connect this new behavior with any new foods your son has started on in the last few months? Any new supplements or medications? Also, a strange question but - does he brush his teeth still with baby toothpaste or with a toddler one (that has fluoride in it)? If later, if he accidently swallows it, fluoride may trigger a number of challenges in kiddies with autism. 

Lena - posted on 02/10/2009

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Shelly, are you able to connect this new behavior with any new foods your son has started on in the last few months? Any new supplements or medications? Also, a strange question but - does he brush his teeth still with baby toothpaste or with a toddler one (that has fluoride in it)? If later, if he accidently swallows it, fluoride may trigger a number of challenges in kiddies with autism. 

Lena - posted on 02/10/2009

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Shelly, are you able to connect this new behavior with any new foods your son has started on in the last few months? Any new supplements or medications? Also, a strange question but - does he brush his teeth still with baby toothpaste or with a toddler one (that has fluoride in it)? If later, if he accidently swallows it, fluoride may trigger a number of challenges in kiddies with autism. 

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