why cant i find a school that is good for my Asperger's kindergardner?

Ashley - posted on 09/27/2009 ( 15 moms have responded )

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The school always has her in the hall, she crys and screams not to go and the teacher eeryday have a bad report for me. I've done so much to give them a heads up from her diagnose to sending her phycologist to the school nothings working !!! Help please

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Richlyn - posted on 10/02/2009

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Here is the problem, " No Child Left Behind " When Bush created this program, he never imagined what a mess it was going to be. My child, now 24, never went through the terrible things I hear parents talk about. I found a Elem. sch. I loved and a High school that created a program for students with disabilities. You really have to fight for your chilld. Get an advocate, who is familier with learning disabilities. Get the parents rights book, and read it from cover to cover. It will be hard, but for your baby girls and your peace of mind, it has to be done. I am happy for you, that you found out early, and a name was put to this disability. You have no idea what kind of headaches come with a slow diognosis!!!!! I live in Montgomery Co. , Md and they have one of the best systems for children with dis. from ele. to collage. My son, yes with A.S. went to collage. He felt so proud to be with "the regular students" You will cry many tears, dealing with sch.officials, but your joy will come from the child right in the next room!!!!!

Kelly - posted on 09/30/2009

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Have you considered homeschooling or unschooling as we like to call it. I have a 6 year old with Aspergers and she went to Waldorf for kindergarten, it was a really great school with a really great teacher and she hated to go. This year with home schooling so far has been great she is doing really well learning the stuff she loves while we are slowing working on the areas she is not too fond of.

My experience with public school with my older son with learning disabilities is that they are just not able to meet the needs of so many different kids all at the same time. Please if it sounds like something you may only be slightly interested in do some research online there is so much good info. Home learning is a wonderful way to build a really strong family base. Good luck to you.

Christine - posted on 09/30/2009

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hey hunny I know how you feel I couldnt find a pre school who would take my son as they said he was to difficult to deal with he has autisum so took him out of school system and home educated him myself its really hard hunny but are there any support groups to help we had starfish love chrissy x

Tanya - posted on 09/29/2009

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Reading the replies here really makes my heart sink. My son was diagnosed Autistic when he was 5, however here in Australia there is very little support. Consequently, even with the diagnosis Dillen had no choice but to survive in main stream until year Three.



Due to my individual pursuits Dillen recieved speach therapy, and was also provided with an exercise plan from a Pediatrician to build upon his fine motor skills. However I am no expert, I am just a mum, and with no support it was impossible to know if what I was doing was right.



By third grade the Education system here finally identified Dillen as a child who may benefit from support, for the support system here has only ever catered for severely disabled children, and as Dillen grew older the methods used to diagnose him had changed, which resulted in him moving to within the Autistic Spectrum with a mild intellectual delay, not Autistic.



However the IM class he was given placement in seemed to be of benefit, the teacher had additional qualifications to assist in educating children with intellectual disabilities, and Dillen seemed happier due to no longer being compared to children capable of a lot more than he was.



Over the years I received assessments that placed Dillen highly within his class, which for me was reassuring, however nothing in the class is catered towards Autism, therefore Dillen has never been provided with a structure to benefit him, or to give him the ability to reach his full potential. Some say the classes are only really designed to separate the underacheivers from the pack, it makes school statistics look better.



Anyway, Dillen is now 12 and I am once again fighting the Department for support. There simply is nothing available for children that do not display severe disabilities. If he remained classified Autistic then there is an entire school. However because he has learnt to live with his disabilities, maybe due to peer pressure and teasing from main stream placement, Dillen has not been provided with a place in a support class for high school.



Yes I have had him reassessed by a reputable child psychologist at my own expense, and Dillens diagnosis has not changed. I have also jumped up and down and screamed at every Departmental representative. However I am told off the books that there is simply not enough places in support classes for the children who require it.



Consequently Dillen has been graded by the Department as one who may benefit more from main stream placement for high school, than a position in a support class. As they believe that some children do better in main stream regardless of their diagnosis.



How do I protect my Autistic child from the ridicule he is going to be subject to in the playground? how do I as him Mum provide him with what he needs to be his very best without support.



What you all have is valuable beyond words, one stupid 'Superintendant' is noting compared to fighting an entire stupid system. Looking at the glass half full may be of more assistance than any advice that could be given.

Lea - posted on 09/29/2009

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If you truly get nowhere with the teacher and principal- and it sounds like you tried early on to let them know what to expect- keep going. I can't believe the superintendant wants your daughter in the hall or crying every day. Take the psychologist with you. I just had the mobile therapist with me today for a behavioral issue teacher conference. It really does take a village- you be the chief.Strong, in charge, no backing down. Please keep us posted!

Lea - posted on 09/29/2009

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Mine is mainstreamed without an IEP (Individualizes Education Plan)- but the noises and everything hanging all over the walls and down from the ceilings really bother him. He does best in a plain cubbyhole type of setting-- and quiet. Conference with the teacher and principal ASAP- they have to accommodate her needs. Mine is also very adverse to going to school- it is not fun for him. Remember that with Asperger's there is also a social misadjustment/lack of development that makes things harder, too- so it's trying to please the adults and not knowing how to talk with peers about all that's going on in the classroom and in the end mine holds it all in all day- and when he gets home he lets it all out.

Colleen - posted on 09/29/2009

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make sure your child has an IEP ... and have an advocate with you when have to go the meeting ... they'll devise a plan that the school HAS to abide by ... and the advocate will speak up for you and ask questions that you may forget to ... i live in ri and i go to RIPIN ... they are wonderful ...let me know if i can be of anymore help ... good luck!

Wendy - posted on 09/28/2009

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we live in canada and you need to get an IEP as everyone else has suggested. my son gets occ therapy and massage therapy. he also has sensory tools in the classroom that greatly helps him. he has a scooter that he wiggles his bum to get it to move and when ever he gets ants in his pants or is uable to focus the teacher has him do a lap of the school and he is focused again. they also have a seat insert,wieghted vest and a exersise ball for him to do stretching exersises.

Heather - posted on 09/28/2009

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You need an IEP. It is a wonderful thing to have. The IEP team sits down and comes up with goals for your child. My son can be hard to handle in the classroom but, luckily he has a good teacher who is working for him. He gets speech therapy now and we are working on Occ therapy. I know one other girl is getting her own aid for school but she has autism and is not very functioning. I would try that first. Changing schools might make the behavior worse I know my son doesn't like change.

Audrey - posted on 09/28/2009

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Keep looking. My daughter has Asperger's and with the right teacher and alot of work at home she has come so far. My daughter is high functioning but still requires alot of work. Be strong.

Judy - posted on 09/27/2009

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My heart goes out to your daughter. It really does. My daughter went to kindergarten and there were only 8 children total in her class and she still had many diffculties..Does your daughter have an IEP? Ifnot, you need to request one. First, the school will do an MFE- or multifactored evaluation. This will determin if your child even needs an IEP. (Which she does, but the schools are ass backwards if you ask me!)

Second, is the teacher willing to work with you? If he/ she is, ask her to make your child a seperate area in which to do her school work. A spot IN the classroom, NOT in the hall. A place where she can still see what is going on, but the other children can't see her. Miss P did this for my daughter and it made a world of difference! I about lost it when my daughter looked at me the one day and said to me, "Momma,I thought you said school was gonna be fun." That did it for me. Her 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grade years I home schooled her. Then I found a school that specializes in AS and now she is in 5th grade there and there are only 4 kids in her class- 1 teacher and 1 aide! I have been blessed and my daughter now says that school IS fun! I sure hope this helps!

Jodi - posted on 09/27/2009

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The classroom has sounds and smells that probably bother her. Also the florecent lighting can be a painful stimulas. Your child need to have special accomidations and an IEP through special education is what she needs. She will qualify because of her aspergers. Call your local DHS and find out what the scholl has to provide for your daughter. It is a federal requirement that schools provide special educatiion to all children with special needs. The Federal government provides funding to all US schools for this. Sitting in the hall crying is not an education.

Jodi - posted on 09/27/2009

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The classroom has sounds and smells that probably bother her. Also the florecent lighting can be a painful stimulas. Your child need to have special accomidations and an IEP through special education is what she needs. She will qualify because of her aspergers. Call your local DHS and find out what the scholl has to provide for your daughter. It is a federal requirement that schools provide special educatiion to all children with special needs. The Federal government provides funding to all US schools for this. Sitting in the hall crying is not an education.

Jodi - posted on 09/27/2009

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The classroom has sounds and smells that probably bother her. Also the florecent lighting can be a painful stimulas. Your child need to have special accomidations and an IEP through special education is what she needs. She will qualify because of her aspergers. Call your local DHS and find out what the scholl has to provide for your daughter. It is a federal requirement that schools provide special educatiion to all children with special needs. The Federal government provides funding to all US schools for this. Sitting in the hall crying is not an education.

Jodi - posted on 09/27/2009

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The classroom has sounds and smells that probably bother her. Also the florecent lighting can be a painful stimulas. Your child need to have special accomidations and an IEP through special education is what she needs. She will qualify because of her aspergers. Call your local DHS and find out what the scholl has to provide for your daughter. It is a federal requirement that schools provide special educatiion to all children with special needs. The Federal government provides funding to all US schools for this. Sitting in the hall crying is not an education.

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