Breastfeeding is hard!

[deleted account] ( 29 moms have responded )

Was anyone else surprised at how really difficult it is to breastfeed even thought it is the natural thing to do?

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Minnie - posted on 06/14/2009

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Melissa,



I am not going to insult you or offend you I just want you to know that you have been going on misinformation. The truth is that only about 2% of all human mothers cannot or should not breastfeed their infants. It really does women a disservice for you to give out blatant UNTRUTHS (that breastfeeding actually causes failure to thrive and infants missing important milestones).



In traditional societies, where formula is not an option, the success rate of breastfeeding is greater than 99%. How do you account for that? It's in western cultures that the art of breastfeeding has been lost during the 50s and 60s when infants were almost exclusively formula fed. Now we have first generation breastfeeders, who don't have mothers, grandmothers, and sisters, aunts, cousins, and close female friends to support and educate a new mother. THAT is why we have so many women (like here on COM) who insist they just COULDN'T nurse or that their milk wasn't enough. And also due to our commercialistic society in which formula has pushed half-truths and lies onto unsuspecting mothers and doctors who have a vested interest in advocating formula.



I highly doubt that our species, not to mention all of mammalia, would have been so incredibly successful on this planet if breastfeeding truly was the mysterious, complicated, and inadequate thing that women make it out to be.





Just so you know, both of my girls are skinny. I and my husband are skinny. I was 15 lb at 13 months (so less than your girl!!) and I was breastfed. I am perfectly healthy. My first was 16 lb at 13 months. She is 3 years old and only 24 lb and in the less than 1st percentile. My second is following in her tracks (AND happens to have crawled and sat up by herself at 5 1/2 months- and at eight months is starting to walk, and gets ONLY my milk- and in fact, infants in traditional cultures tend to crawl earlier than their western counterparts). All of this to say: doctors are so incredibly used to the growth of formula fed babies- they base ALL babies' growth on those charts, which are tailored to formula babies. And then when they come across a child who does not fit in with the average, they want to fix it. THAT is why doctors give breastfed infants formula for 'FTT.' Because they think every child should fit in with the norm, and they think they have to fix something that doesn't. And formula packs on the pounds because it's produced from a substance that's designed to make a large mammal grow 500lb in its first year of life.



A better way, if the infant TRULY had FTT, would be to check latch (one of the major reasons infants don't get adequate milk intake), make sure mother is not limiting time on the breast, check to see if mother is feeding on demand, to make sure she isn't supplementing, to see if there is another health issue that needs to be addressed, etc.



You say that your child has always been on a schedule- it is a known fact that scheduling a breastfed infant is a major cause of FTT. It is not breastfeeding itself that causes it, but the MISUSE of breastfeeding.

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Louise - posted on 06/15/2009

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I too thought breastfeeding would come naturally and be easy, how wrong I was!! It took Jack and I weeks to master and there were many times were I fantasised about starting him on the bottle due to massive sleep deprivation and extremely sore nipples (showering was agony)! We kept at it and now nearly four months on we are both doing really well. Jack is putting on lots of weight and I can once again enjoy my showers, (when I get the chance)! Anyway hope this is helpful xox

Kylie - posted on 06/14/2009

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With my daughter I had trouble the first three days of breastfeeding but the midwives spent a lot of time with me and my baby helping us getting our breastfeeding technique right. They wouldn't let me go home until i could get her on and feed her comfortably. They showed me how to lay down and nurse and it was the best thing ever. As soon as i got home i was a natural and my baby thrived, i ended up sticking with it for 2 years. My cousin tried to breast feed but she didn't get the support i did and ended up with sore nipples and eventually mastitis so she gave up after a few months. i think breastfeeding is the easiest part of motherhood and i think it pays to get expert help in the early days to help you get started.
with my second baby my milk didn't come in for 3 full days and he was soo hungry on the third day i sent my hubby out to go get me a bottle and formula, my baby had one formula feed and an hour later i had heaps of milk..the human body is an amazing thing.

Ashley - posted on 06/14/2009

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i wanted to bf so bad. and i tried but my son couldn't latch on properly and was therefore starving:(, so when he was 3 days old i gave up and gave him formula. i cried all night and for a few days after every time i fed him cuz i couldn't bf. i felt like it was me and that i was a failure as a mom, but when he was 2 months old i found out he was tongue tied( the little piece of skin that attatches the tongue to the bottom of the mouth is too far forward, almost to the tip of his tongue so he couldn't stick his tongue out) so we got that fixed and if they would've caught it at the hospital i would've been more than likely to bf. but he is just as happy on formula, in fact they say you need to bf cuz it helps build their immune system, but my son is 7 months old and he just got his first ear infection a couple weeks ago. there is nothing wrong with bottle feeding, but if bf is something you really want to so than don't give up. good luck. don't listen to people on here just giving you a lecture, you came here for advice and that's what most people are doing.

[deleted account]

wow i'm glad to see that i'm not the only one. didn't mean to start a fight! my baby is 12 weeks and we are still bf-ing. my supply has been a problem but we are working on it!

Marie - posted on 06/14/2009

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Quoting Toni:

Hey all, I just wanted to add my thoughts to this.. my son is 3 weeks old. Breastfeeding was extremley difficult for me, even after seeing a lactation consultant or 2, He couldnt latch. And to add to the problem, he had been fed formula in bottles in hosptiatl because they were concered about how low his sugars were. He learned to take the bottle this way, and after 2 weeks of attempting to breastfeed with no luck, after researching and learning all about it, trying to work it out, stress and no change, I did give up. Im not going to lie, but at that point it wasnt working out for us, and I did stop trying. I did my best, and I think thats all anyone can do without going crazy and gettitng really stressed out. I did get a breastpump and am pumpin so he can get some braestmilk in there, but obv doesnt have the full effect that full nursing would. It is incredibly difficult, makes you wonder in the old days , before formula how they did it, well they had wet nurses, but yeah crazy.



Hi Toni,



Sorry to hear you had to give up something you wanted to do. I have a friend who had to pump for the last 8 months and take a lactation drug for most of it because she couldn't nurse her baby - we suspect - now- that he has a small tongue tie that stops him from being able to latch correctly - he can't stick out his tongue.  You can get your baby checked for that and still try to nurse once it's been corrected.



 



Also, pinch your nipple between your thumb and forefinger - place your fingers at the outside of your areola about 1/2 an inch away from the nipple and slowly move your fingers together. Watch what your nipples do - if they withdraw or go flat, you CAN BF but you have to start with a nipple shield to get baby back to nursing, and transition away from it over a period of a week or so.  Also, pumping should help distend your nipples giving baby something to attach to.



As for the latter information - personal experience - I have flat nipples and large areola. When my milk came in baby couldn't latch. He slept in 2 18 hour stretches which my midwife chewed me out for, then we started pumping and spoon feeding Alex until he woke enough to take more, AND we used a nipple shield.  You can also buy nipple shapers and shields by Medela.



My son is now 13 months and still breastfeeding. :)

Marie - posted on 06/14/2009

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Quoting Toni:

Hey all, I just wanted to add my thoughts to this.. my son is 3 weeks old. Breastfeeding was extremley difficult for me, even after seeing a lactation consultant or 2, He couldnt latch. And to add to the problem, he had been fed formula in bottles in hosptiatl because they were concered about how low his sugars were. He learned to take the bottle this way, and after 2 weeks of attempting to breastfeed with no luck, after researching and learning all about it, trying to work it out, stress and no change, I did give up. Im not going to lie, but at that point it wasnt working out for us, and I did stop trying. I did my best, and I think thats all anyone can do without going crazy and gettitng really stressed out. I did get a breastpump and am pumpin so he can get some braestmilk in there, but obv doesnt have the full effect that full nursing would. It is incredibly difficult, makes you wonder in the old days , before formula how they did it, well they had wet nurses, but yeah crazy.



Hi Toni,



Sorry to hear you had to give up something you wanted to do. I have a friend who had to pump for the last 8 months and take a lactation drug for most of it because she couldn't nurse her baby - we suspect - now- that he has a small tongue tie that stops him from being able to latch correctly - he can't stick out his tongue.  You can get your baby checked for that and still try to nurse once it's been corrected.



 



Also, pinch your nipple between your thumb and forefinger - place your fingers at the outside of your areola about 1/2 an inch away from the nipple and slowly move your fingers together. Watch what your nipples do - if they withdraw or go flat, you CAN BF but you have to start with a nipple shield to get baby back to nursing, and transition away from it over a period of a week or so.  Also, pumping should help distend your nipples giving baby something to attach to.



As for the latter information - personal experience - I have flat nipples and large areola. When my milk came in baby couldn't latch. He slept in 2 18 hour stretches which my midwife chewed me out for, then we started pumping and spoon feeding Alex until he woke enough to take more, AND we used a nipple shield.  You can also buy nipple shapers and shields by Medela.



My son is now 13 months and still breastfeeding. :)

Kirsten - posted on 06/14/2009

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I am still finding it a bit hard after 3 months. But I think the thing that kept me going at first was-even adoptive mothers can get their bodies to produce milk and breast feed! So, if that can happen I can do it too!. It has been most helpful to rely on friends and family to help me with the process. But it does seem weird!

Rebekah - posted on 06/14/2009

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Yes Tori, it is hard. I hoped after my boys came out of NICU after 3 months it would all work but it didn't and I ended up pumping for another 4 months on top of that. I hope I'm able to do it next time but now that I know it's not so straightforward I hopefully will be a bit more prepared. Good luck.

Toni - posted on 06/14/2009

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Hey all, I just wanted to add my thoughts to this.. my son is 3 weeks old. Breastfeeding was extremley difficult for me, even after seeing a lactation consultant or 2, He couldnt latch. And to add to the problem, he had been fed formula in bottles in hosptiatl because they were concered about how low his sugars were. He learned to take the bottle this way, and after 2 weeks of attempting to breastfeed with no luck, after researching and learning all about it, trying to work it out, stress and no change, I did give up. Im not going to lie, but at that point it wasnt working out for us, and I did stop trying. I did my best, and I think thats all anyone can do without going crazy and gettitng really stressed out. I did get a breastpump and am pumpin so he can get some braestmilk in there, but obv doesnt have the full effect that full nursing would. It is incredibly difficult, makes you wonder in the old days , before formula how they did it, well they had wet nurses, but yeah crazy.

Mel - posted on 06/14/2009

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hey Lisa, just wanted to say thanks for your post. Even if i dont agree with you i appreciate you taking the time to respond and its good to know there are some other little babies out there! mine got to 8.8 kilos a few weeks back, now shes back at 8.5 so i guess i just have to keep up the constant feeding and hopefully by the time she is 2 she will be off formula and a growing girl. Thanks again

Minnie - posted on 06/14/2009

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I think they are- kellymom has theirs all set up already...if I put my three year olds' weights into them, while on the formula charts she's in the less than one percentile, on the breastfeeding charts she's up to the 25th percentile. Obviously less than average still, but skinny people are normal too, lol!! But it is a huge difference.

Sarah - posted on 06/14/2009

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Quoting Lisa:

Melissa,

I am not going to insult you or offend you I just want you to know that you have been going on misinformation. The truth is that only about 2% of all human mothers cannot or should not breastfeed their infants. It really does women a disservice for you to give out blatant UNTRUTHS (that breastfeeding actually causes failure to thrive and infants missing important milestones).

In traditional societies, where formula is not an option, the success rate of breastfeeding is greater than 99%. How do you account for that? It's in western cultures that the art of breastfeeding has been lost during the 50s and 60s when infants were almost exclusively formula fed. Now we have first generation breastfeeders, who don't have mothers, grandmothers, and sisters, aunts, cousins, and close female friends to support and educate a new mother. THAT is why we have so many women (like here on COM) who insist they just COULDN'T nurse or that their milk wasn't enough. And also due to our commercialistic society in which formula has pushed half-truths and lies onto unsuspecting mothers and doctors who have a vested interest in advocating formula.

I highly doubt that our species, not to mention all of mammalia, would have been so incredibly successful on this planet if breastfeeding truly was the mysterious, complicated, and inadequate thing that women make it out to be.

Just so you know, both of my girls are skinny. I and my husband are skinny. I was 15 lb at 13 months (so less than your girl!!) and I was breastfed. I am perfectly healthy. My first was 16 lb at 13 months. She is 3 years old and only 24 lb and in the less than 1st percentile. My second is following in her tracks (AND happens to have crawled and sat up by herself at 5 1/2 months- and at eight months is starting to walk, and gets ONLY my milk- and in fact, infants in traditional cultures tend to crawl earlier than their western counterparts). All of this to say: doctors are so incredibly used to the growth of formula fed babies- they base ALL babies' growth on those charts, which are tailored to formula babies. And then when they come across a child who does not fit in with the average, they want to fix it. THAT is why doctors give breastfed infants formula for 'FTT.' Because they think every child should fit in with the norm, and they think they have to fix something that doesn't. And formula packs on the pounds because it's produced from a substance that's designed to make a large mammal 500lb in its first year of life.

You say that your child has always been on a schedule- it is a known fact that scheduling a breastfed infant is a major cause of FTT. It is not breastfeeding itself tat causes it, but the MISUSE of breastfeeding.


on the point about the growth charts, aren't they going to make new ones now that take into account BF babies?? i hope they are as it may clear up some of the 'weight' issues around the subject! as i've said, i didn't BF but i think it's a very good thing, and i hope they do change the charts in the future so BF-ing mum's don't get worried about the weight gain (or lack of) issue. :)

Sarah - posted on 06/14/2009

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Hi Tori. i found breastfeeding extremely difficult, so difficult in fact that i ended up bottle feeding. The 'support' i received at the hospital wasn't very good, and i found it too distressing for me and my kids. i remember one of the nice nurses saying tho that it's not actually a babies instinct to breastfeed, it's something they have to learn. i guess that's why it can be so difficult, i'd always assumed it was something they just 'knew' what to do.
i think if you can try to continue that's the better option, but i also don't think there's anything wrong with giving formula. :)

Mel - posted on 06/14/2009

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and i never fed on demand. i never got that luxury. ive had a feeding schedule which has to be on time for the past 14 months.

Mel - posted on 06/14/2009

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and you dont push your views on others to! look through the COMs main page. do yourself a favour and look how many women have said their babies just did not gain infact dropped even 20% of their body weight on breast milk. due to it not having as much calories unfortunately as much as some mums really want to BF they just cant and unfortunately i have seen it make so many mothers several depressed and upset when really they dont have to be. so what they dont need is people pushing BF-ing on them. thats all im going to say if you dont believe the facts that is fine but all you have to do is look on here. yeah she was FTT because she just like me as a baby doesnt seem to put on weight easy shes going to be skinny all her life. in most cases formula helps but in my case all it did was keep her alive. shes still dangerously low apparently but shes alive and she would not be on breast milk so at least i can get greatful for that and this is on high calorie formula. im another example i lost weight on breast milk and therefore had to be formula fed yet i was still only just on 8 kilos at 13 months which i think equals to about 16 pounds dont quote me i could be wrong.

Jackie - posted on 06/14/2009

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Your child was FTT for reason not because she was nursed. Maybe you weren't nursing properly. Maybe you weren't taking care of yourself enough to be able to nurse. Maybe your hormones aren't working right to produce the milk she needed. Maybe her latch wasn't proper because her mouth doesn't function properly. Maybe you were taking in too much of a food she has an allergy to. Maybe you were feeding here every 4 hours instead of on demand like nursed babys must be. Maybe maybe maybe.. but NOT due to nursing. Nursing itself does NOT cause FTT babies. Nursing doesn't do anything you have decided in your own mind it does. I'm not sure why you are in such denial about reality. I'm not sure why you like to make up your own reasons. I'm not sure why you don't do proper research and ask your doctors/nurses the proper questions to fully understand whats going on with your childs health. But don't push your ignorance on poor unexpecting mothers as the god written truth. Mother nature never would have created nursing if she didn't intented for babys to thrive on it! And if done properly with a little work you can end up with a beautiful, healthy, baby. As for the size thing... my sister was exclusively nursed until the age of 1 due to a gag reflex that would have caused her to starve to death on formula. At the age of 1 she was as big as our 3 year old brother. So your attitude that formula is the solution to everything... well once again proven wrong.

Mel - posted on 06/14/2009

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Quoting Jackie:



Quoting Melissa:

yes. i was also surprised to find out that it was not the best option majority of the time. its really a personal choice but breast feeding makes is so that baby does not meet their milestones very quickly and can gain very little weight and become FTT like mine. anyway im not going to give you a lecture just know that many of us out there know how you feel! bring on the formula, at least i will know better for second time around.






This is the biggest amount of bull i have ever heard in my whole entire 31 years on this earth!  Breastfeeding is best all the time.  It may not be an option due to many reasons but the most common one being peoples attitudes like yours.  It is hard work... if you haven't nursed before not only is the baby learning how to do it properly so are you!  Nothing worth having and doing is ever easy.  As for milestones and growth...  nursed babys have a higher IQ and reach all their milestones just when they are suppose to.  As my niece who was exclusively nursed until 6 months old and started solids... who is walking at 9 months old!!!  As for growth, yes nursed babys have a totally different growth chart then formula fed babies there is a reason for this.  Nursed babys use ALL the nurtirtion they recieve and use it properly because its in the form they are meant to recieve it.  Formula fed babys can be over weight and have other issues due to the fact that they are taking in things their body never needed all day long!  There are 4 children in my house hold who were nursed and they all hit their milestones on early or on time.  Most of them were early.  The one who was formula due to medical reasons hit her milestones early also... but she was nursed for 3 months too.  The way you choice to feed your child does NOT effect milestones or growth unless there is a underlining medical reason to begin with.  Right now I have two babys who I see daily.  The one who is breastfed is 3 lb lighter then the formula fed one but was born 3 lbs lighter then the formula fed one!  The formula fed one has met her milestones early and on time.  The breastfed baby has met all her milestones very early.  Including using 2 word sentences before 1 years old.  So where is your information coming from?  What are you comparing?  Stop giving out misinformation that is totally off the wall.  The last thing any mother needs struggling with nursing is an anti-nursing mother telling her flat out lies! 





 



 



woah dont you have some issues. im not going to take offence since i know you only act this way due to a personal problem with me, but to answer your question why do you think they put FTT and low weight babies on formula? its because yes formula babies do gain more weight and because they gain more weight they meet their milestones quicker. example my little girl is tiny and due to being small she has met her milestones very slowly didnt sit by herself til 11 and a half months can only commando crawl and just now at 14 months has she first pulled herself up to her cot this morning. im a very proud mummy now! point is little babies take longer to do things because they just done have their weight on them and therefore are no strong enough.



 



as for your comment about IQs this has come up alot on here and like many have said thats a big load of BS. there are many intelligent formula fed kids. my daughter was formula fed and guess what shes very very smart done everything from an early age picks things up quick started talking at 5 months playing with toys at 1 and a half months. very very clever little girl.

Jackie - posted on 06/14/2009

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Quoting Melissa:

yes. i was also surprised to find out that it was not the best option majority of the time. its really a personal choice but breast feeding makes is so that baby does not meet their milestones very quickly and can gain very little weight and become FTT like mine. anyway im not going to give you a lecture just know that many of us out there know how you feel! bring on the formula, at least i will know better for second time around.



This is the biggest amount of bull i have ever heard in my whole entire 31 years on this earth!  Breastfeeding is best all the time.  It may not be an option due to many reasons but the most common one being peoples attitudes like yours.  It is hard work... if you haven't nursed before not only is the baby learning how to do it properly so are you!  Nothing worth having and doing is ever easy.  As for milestones and growth...  nursed babys have a higher IQ and reach all their milestones just when they are suppose to.  As my niece who was exclusively nursed until 6 months old and started solids... who is walking at 9 months old!!!  As for growth, yes nursed babys have a totally different growth chart then formula fed babies there is a reason for this.  Nursed babys use ALL the nurtirtion they recieve and use it properly because its in the form they are meant to recieve it.  Formula fed babys can be over weight and have other issues due to the fact that they are taking in things their body never needed all day long!  There are 4 children in my house hold who were nursed and they all hit their milestones on early or on time.  Most of them were early.  The one who was formula due to medical reasons hit her milestones early also... but she was nursed for 3 months too.  The way you choice to feed your child does NOT effect milestones or growth unless there is a underlining medical reason to begin with.  Right now I have two babys who I see daily.  The one who is breastfed is 3 lb lighter then the formula fed one but was born 3 lbs lighter then the formula fed one!  The formula fed one has met her milestones early and on time.  The breastfed baby has met all her milestones very early.  Including using 2 word sentences before 1 years old.  So where is your information coming from?  What are you comparing?  Stop giving out misinformation that is totally off the wall.  The last thing any mother needs struggling with nursing is an anti-nursing mother telling her flat out lies! 

Jackie - posted on 06/14/2009

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Quoting Melissa:

yes. i was also surprised to find out that it was not the best option majority of the time. its really a personal choice but breast feeding makes is so that baby does not meet their milestones very quickly and can gain very little weight and become FTT like mine. anyway im not going to give you a lecture just know that many of us out there know how you feel! bring on the formula, at least i will know better for second time around.



This is the biggest amount of bull i have ever heard in my whole entire 31 years on this earth!  Breastfeeding is best all the time.  It may not be an option due to many reasons but the most common one being peoples attitudes like yours.  It is hard work... if you haven't nursed before not only is the baby learning how to do it properly so are you!  Nothing worth having and doing is ever easy.  As for milestones and growth...  nursed babys have a higher IQ and reach all their milestones just when they are suppose to.  As my niece who was exclusively nursed until 6 months old and started solids... who is walking at 9 months old!!!  As for growth, yes nursed babys have a totally different growth chart then formula fed babies there is a reason for this.  Nursed babys use ALL the nurtirtion they recieve and use it properly because its in the form they are meant to recieve it.  Formula fed babys can be over weight and have other issues due to the fact that they are taking in things their body never needed all day long!  There are 4 children in my house hold who were nursed and they all hit their milestones on early or on time.  Most of them were early.  The one who was formula due to medical reasons hit her milestones early also... but she was nursed for 3 months too.  The way you choice to feed your child does NOT effect milestones or growth unless there is a underlining medical reason to begin with.  Right now I have two babys who I see daily.  The one who is breastfed is 3 lb lighter then the formula fed one but was born 3 lbs lighter then the formula fed one!  The formula fed one has met her milestones early and on time.  The breastfed baby has met all her milestones very early.  Including using 2 word sentences before 1 years old.  So where is your information coming from?  What are you comparing?  Stop giving out misinformation that is totally off the wall.  The last thing any mother needs struggling with nursing is an anti-nursing mother telling her flat out lies! 

Mel - posted on 06/14/2009

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yes. i was also surprised to find out that it was not the best option majority of the time. its really a personal choice but breast feeding makes is so that baby does not meet their milestones very quickly and can gain very little weight and become FTT like mine. anyway im not going to give you a lecture just know that many of us out there know how you feel! bring on the formula, at least i will know better for second time around.

[deleted account]

I can't breastfeed unfortunately. I tried everything to help but even the midwife said it would be too difficult.

Traci - posted on 06/13/2009

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I think its initially difficult, but once you get going, it is waaaay easier than bottles. With my first baby, it was PAINFUL for the first month or so. Blood and all! But after that first month it was so much easier. No packing up bottles, messy powders, etc. In the middle of the night, you just feed-no warming necessary! With my second and third kids I was afraid it would hurt again like with the first one, but it didn't at all. Hang in there! It is worth it!

Lynlee - posted on 06/13/2009

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Hi again and yes! Our son took about five days to figure out how to latch. We stayed in hospital for that length of time as I could not get him to eat and was determined to breastfeed. I hand expressed to begin with which was really difficult especially when every new midwife who comes on duty shows you a different way to do it. Then I pumped and fed our son with either a syringe or a finger tube. Finally he got it but man it hurt. I know they say if it hurts then the baby is not latched on properly but I am convinced that it will hurt for a while any way. I had read lots of books about breastfeeding and thought it would be easier but it was still painful three and a half months later! Eventually I went to the lactation consultant at the hospital and she said he was latching properly etc but said when baby gets tired sometimes they slip off slightly and that can cause pain. Also he was jerking back whenever I had a letdown which didn't help. After that it came right and I ended up breastfeeding til he was two when he weaned himself. Just keep perservering - I'm so glad we did!

Raechel - posted on 06/13/2009

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Breastfeeding is one of the hardest things in motherhood. I am technically not breastfeeding but I pump and feed it to my little girl. I tried the breast for a solid month and she would just fall asleep and I wouldn't get any sleep because she wouldn't eat enough. Not to mention I also had a supply problem because of her not eating correctly. Now I just pump because I still want her to get what is natural. She is now 13 weeks old and she sleeps through the night!

Cathelijn - posted on 06/13/2009

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I know!! I always thought it would just work. Straight after I delivered my daughter she latched right on but that was the only time it was easy! After that it was so diffecult for her to latch on it didn't help that lots of nurses came to teach me how to do it and kept pushing her on and she wouldn't get it..

Then I got cracked nipples and the health visitor kep telling me that I was doing it wrong it was all very frustrating and we are not even talking about the every hour feeds 24 hours a day! after 12 weeks I started pumping and just giving her breast milk in a bottle but then my milk dried up and so that was it. I am happy I did it because I know there are lots of health benefits for the baby but I was surprised that a natural thing could be so hard!

[deleted account]

Yes - although it's natural what they don't tell you is you have to teach your little one how to do it properly or it hurts. Even after my fourth I was amazed how something we think a baby should automatically know how to do (they would starve otherwise!!) is so flipping hard and painful at times.

Chantel - posted on 06/13/2009

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Yes!!! I always heard its the best thing and its natural and all that and no one ever said its really hard for some people!! I ended up quitting after 6 weeks but good luck to you!!

Marie - posted on 06/13/2009

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YES!! In fact my baby was STARVING inside the first 24 hours he was alive because he couldn't latch. He slept for two 18 hour stretches. We had him on to nurse whenever he woke up but he couldn't get a good latch since I have flat/inverted nipples. Nipple shield and pumping fixed everything. I've been through a HUGE list of things going on with my nipples my supply you name it.. I've been lucky enough never to experience mastitis.



Oh and the exhaustion! OMG! Of course just when you start wondering if the "every 2 hour feedings at the OMG-hour of the AM" will ever end and they finally do, you wake up at 3am in shock realising that baby didn't wake up and you can crawl back to bed.



One of my friends once said to me "Just when you think you're used to a certain behaviour or way of things, baby changes something". It's so true.



My little guy is almost 13 months and he's still breastfeeding.. Now to figure out how to get him to stop waking for a 2nd overnight feed...

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