A shocking 20%

Michelle - posted on 04/01/2009 ( 13 moms have responded )

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Ive recently been told off a doctor that my baby wasnt trieving as she wasnt putting on enough wieght. My daughter has plenty of little fat rolls and a couple of chins so i wasnt overly worried but i did some research just to put my mind at ease. I was shocked to find that only 20% Of British women breastfeed and most of theese supplement. I dont understand it! Where has it all gone wrong and what are other countries doing that were not???

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Megan - posted on 04/04/2009

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I wish more doctors were pro-breastfeeding or at least knew enough about it to give better advice about what to do. I'm fortunate that my doctor doesn't mind my breastfeeding my son, but if I were having problems, he would be of no help to me. I'm just glad there are other places out there for help with problems. We need to get our doctors more updated with the positive aspects of breastfeeding and maybe they would promote it better.

Chelsea - posted on 04/04/2009

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Quoting Carolyn:



Quoting Chelsea:




I would just like to dispel the myth that because your doctor tells you to start solids before 6 months it's not always and usually isn't the right choice.  Just because a baby will eat three meals a day and still nurse a lot does not mean that they need to solids.  









How refreshing to have someone else mention that for a change!! Sometimes I feel like I'm the only one in these forums who knows that! I get very frustrated at the lack of information/wrong information out there! It also drives me crazy that old-school docs (and some not so old-school) are dispensing wrong information!!






http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids...






I'm in Canada and we do have slightly higher breastfeeding rentention rates than either the UK or the US (as previously mentioned). I don't think ours ever dipped quite as low as either country, and that's partly due to our public-health system that has actively promoted breastfeeding for many years, as well as provide no cost consultations and information dissemination.






You also need to keep in mind that if they say you're baby is "too small" or "too big"... the growth charts used by most doctors were made up decades ago and are based primarily on a bottle-fed baby who has a different growth profile than a breastfed one. The WHO has "redone" the charts in recent years to reflect a more natural growth profile, but these are still not in wide distribution.






 






 





I wish that there was some way to raise awareness of the wrong information that doctors are giving to breastfeeding mothers and to all mothers regarding solids, natural growth and breastfeeding issues.  Do you know of any way to raise awareness of the myths that doctors or spreading about?



 

Carolyn - posted on 04/04/2009

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Quoting Chelsea:



I would just like to dispel the myth that because your doctor tells you to start solids before 6 months it's not always and usually isn't the right choice.  Just because a baby will eat three meals a day and still nurse a lot does not mean that they need to solids.  





How refreshing to have someone else mention that for a change!! Sometimes I feel like I'm the only one in these forums who knows that! I get very frustrated at the lack of information/wrong information out there! It also drives me crazy that old-school docs (and some not so old-school) are dispensing wrong information!!



http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/solids...



I'm in Canada and we do have slightly higher breastfeeding rentention rates than either the UK or the US (as previously mentioned). I don't think ours ever dipped quite as low as either country, and that's partly due to our public-health system that has actively promoted breastfeeding for many years, as well as provide no cost consultations and information dissemination.



You also need to keep in mind that if they say you're baby is "too small" or "too big"... the growth charts used by most doctors were made up decades ago and are based primarily on a bottle-fed baby who has a different growth profile than a breastfed one. The WHO has "redone" the charts in recent years to reflect a more natural growth profile, but these are still not in wide distribution.



 



 

Johnny - posted on 04/03/2009

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Quoting Kate:

Australia fared a little better in 1995: 84% of babies are breastfed on hospital discharge, 61% are breastfed at three months and 49% at six months. 2001 data shows 23% were being breastfed at one year and only 1% at 2 years. The most common reason reported for discontinuing breastfeeding of children aged 0-3 years old was problems in producing adequate milk (30%). That shows a lack of education, because less than 5% of mothers actually have low milk supply. Sad huh?


It makes me sad that so many mothers stop breastfeeding due to low milk supply.  There is an alarming lack of education and everyone is just so quick to suggest formula as the answer to every feeding problem.  Baby has reflux... give them formula. Baby is too big...give them formula.  Baby is too small...give them formula.  Argh!  It has made me realize how very uneducated on infant issues most doctors actually are.  I know my doc has no idea about babies, he wasn't really sure I needed to bother BFing and suggested solids at 3 months.  So I always follow the advice of my public health nurse and the infant nutritionist (luckily they're both very pro-bf). 



I have chronic low milk supply due to breast surgery and have breastfed my daughter for 8 months with some supplementation until 5 months.  I educated myself on what I needed to do to make it work and joined support groups to get help from other women like me.  Like Kate said, most women don't actually have low milk supply, they may be uncertain about whether there is any milk there after the engorgement ends or find that baby is nursing constantly and not realize it's just a growth spurt or other such issues.  But so many I hear from give up when they don't really want to because no one helped them and their doctor just said, oh well, just give formula then. 



The thing that gets me about all that, is that IT IS POSSIBLE to breastfeed even if you don't have enough.  It shouldn't stop anyone from giving as much as they have to give.  I really wish that nurses & baby doctors received better information worldwide, because our little ones deserve it!

Johnny - posted on 04/03/2009

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Quoting Kate:

Australia fared a little better in 1995: 84% of babies are breastfed on hospital discharge, 61% are breastfed at three months and 49% at six months. 2001 data shows 23% were being breastfed at one year and only 1% at 2 years. The most common reason reported for discontinuing breastfeeding of children aged 0-3 years old was problems in producing adequate milk (30%). That shows a lack of education, because less than 5% of mothers actually have low milk supply. Sad huh?


It makes me sad that so many mothers stop breastfeeding due to low milk supply.  There is an alarming lack of education and everyone is just so quick to suggest formula as the answer to every feeding problem.  Baby has reflux... give them formula. Baby is too big...give them formula.  Baby is too small...give them formula.  Argh!  It has made me realize how very uneducated on infant issues most doctors actually are.  I know my doc has no idea about babies, he wasn't really sure I needed to bother BFing and suggested solids at 3 months.  So I always follow the advice of my public health nurse and the infant nutritionist (luckily they're both very pro-bf). 



I have chronic low milk supply due to breast surgery and have breastfed my daughter for 8 months with some supplementation until 5 months.  I educated myself on what I needed to do to make it work and joined support groups to get help from other women like me.  Like Kate said, most women don't actually have low milk supply, they may be uncertain about whether there is any milk there after the engorgement ends or find that baby is nursing constantly and not realize it's just a growth spurt or other such issues.  But so many I hear from give up when they don't really want to because no one helped them and their doctor just said, oh well, just give formula then. 



The thing that gets me about all that, is that IT IS POSSIBLE to breastfeed even if you don't have enough.  It shouldn't stop anyone from giving as much as they have to give.  I really wish that nurses & baby doctors received better information worldwide, because our little ones deserve it!

Chelsea - posted on 04/03/2009

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Quoting Melody:



My first baby was given formula while I was still in theatre without my consent, then I had no support with latching on so my daughter ended up being bottlefed - I was mortified.  Second time round I refused to go to the same hospital and only one midwife tried to take my baby to give him formula but I insisted he didn't need it and refused to let him go.  He's now 5 months, still breastfeeding and doing great.  I feel there isn't enough education and support, I feel I'm always emabarassing people by feeding my son in public although I'm very discreet.






With regards to getting him off the breast I'm concerned about getting him weaned in time for my return to work but don't feel ready/have the desire to stop altogether.  We know it's best, so why stop?






As for not putting on enough weight, my health visistor told me the same, I put my baby on solids per her recommendation and he's still feeding loads from me as well as 3 meals a day, so I guess she was right - he needed more.






Some of my friends never tried to breastfeed/feel strange about the idea.  Personally I was influenced by the fact my mum breastfed me and my brother and sister.  It seems natural and the right thing to do for me but I know you need encouragement, information, support and determination.






Having had one bottlefed and one breastfed baby my conclusion is breastfeeding is free, easier, better for both your health and I'd recocommend to everyone!





 



I would just like to dispel the myth that because your doctor tells you to start solids before 6 months it's not always and usually isn't the right choice.  Just because a baby will eat three meals a day and still nurse a lot does not mean that they need to solids.  

Allison - posted on 04/03/2009

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Quoting Morag:

. UK also have free lactation consultants available, bfing cafe's, groups... so there is support...it just seems to be poor education on behalf of the medical professionals and public!


And don't forget all the money formula companies spend on marketing, too! 

Morag - posted on 04/03/2009

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Recent studies from the UK NHS say only 3% of women bf'd beyond 6 months. I think its terrible. Ironically UK mothers get a really long maternity leave so really have no excuse to have to quit breastfeeding on that matter. UK also have free lactation consultants available, bfing cafe's, groups... so there is support...it just seems to be poor education on behalf of the medical professionals and public!

Itsamystery - posted on 04/03/2009

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Australia fared a little better in 1995: 84% of babies are breastfed on hospital discharge, 61% are breastfed at three months and 49% at six months. 2001 data shows 23% were being breastfed at one year and only 1% at 2 years. The most common reason reported for discontinuing breastfeeding of children aged 0-3 years old was problems in producing adequate milk (30%). That shows a lack of education, because less than 5% of mothers actually have low milk supply. Sad huh?

Megan - posted on 04/01/2009

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That sounds sad but true. The British people are so private and proper that they may have decided to believe what the media tells them about feeding their babies. Also, I would imagine the US isn't much better. We as a culture are so self-centered that we'd choose the "easy" way over the best way.
Mind you, I'm not bashing those who end up with poor support and can't continue breastfeeding or just don't have the physical strength, but I know there are lots of people out there who don't because they don't feel like it!

Leslie - posted on 04/01/2009

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they tired to tell me to supplement with my first baby they said she wasn't fat enough and i no she was very tall and slender shes 4 now and still slender, i think its more of like she said an older generation were told that formula was better but we all now boob is best!! it has antibodies formula just doesn't have! i have to girls and i must say they never get sick and i nursed both of them!! I'm from Canada and i must say a lot of people i no nurse and the numbers are going up. the goverment has put breast support into community centers which i tend regularly they even give you a food suplement so you can have a healthy baby to nurse.

Carrie - posted on 04/01/2009

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The US isn't much better.  The ideas from the 1950s that formula was scientifically better along with women returning to work sooner (without proper support for pumping) I'm sure has a huge effect on it.  Here's a link on it. 





The US has higher initiation rates, but the rate of exclusive bf (without suppliments) at six months is only 14% which is rather sad. (data as of 2003)  I think one major problem is lack of support from families too, since earlier generations often formula fed their babies and don't know how to help their daughters and grand-daughters learn to bf.



Emma - posted on 04/01/2009

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i dont think them results are very accurate, they cant be, well i hope not. its sad if they are right.



i think other countries either get better support or that they dont have as much choices.



a lot of women here are pressurised into going back to work even though it is now advised that we breastfeed to the age of 2. this country has its priorities all mixed up.



 



i would speek to your health visitor, or have you got a local surestart centre, they do a lot of work to support breast feeding

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