BF myth: Breastfeeding past a year – what’s in it for bub?

[deleted account] ( 267 moms have responded )

This is a subject on which there are vastly differing opinions, some mothers very much against the concept, some very enthusiastic.. I want to make it clear that I’m not talking about when to wean your child – that is completely up to the mother. I’m talking about the benefits provided by breastmilk should the mother decide to breastfeed into toddlerhood.



I think we’re all in agreement about the benefits of breastmilk. But do all these benefits just stop at 12 months (or whatever age?) According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, increased duration of breastfeeding confers significant health and developmental benefits for the child and the mother, especially in delaying return of fertility (thereby promoting optimal intervals between births).

http://www.naturalbeginningsonline.com/b...



In Australia, 21% of children are still being breastfed at 12 months. (Donath and Amir, 2000, quoted in an article published by the Australian Breastfeeding Association. http://www.breastfeeding.asn.au/bfinfo/t...



This same article also provides the following information:



Breastfeeding your toddler can provide:

31% of his daily energy needs,

38% of protein requirements,

45% of Vitamin A requirements, and

95% of Vitamin C needs.

Source: WHO/CDR/93.4



What the research says –

The Australian Breastfeeding Association has provided some more detailed information, discussing the benefits if extended breastfeeding in terms of:



Immunological effects

Goldman and Goldblum (1983) showed that immunologic components of breastmilk are maintained into the second year of lactation and are still providing protection to the infant. The data showed that the production of IgA antibodies operates throughout lactation

Cognitive development

Enhanced cognitive development has been shown to be positively associated with duration of breastfeeding

Obesity and nutrition

Kries (1999) in a cross-sectional study found a clear, inverse, dose-response relationship between the duration of breastfeeding and incidence of obesity and overweight. Longer breastfeeding duration was a significant protective factor, attributed to the composition of breastmilk rather than other lifestyle factors which were adjusted for. In a study of affluent United States infants, those who stopped breastfeeding before 18 months gained more weight from 12 to 24 months, but were the same in length, in comparison with the infants who breastfed for longer than 18 months (Dewey et al 1995).

An interesting fact is that another study of mothers who breastfed for 12 months or more showed a more relaxed attitude to feeding their toddlers and they were less likely to exhibit high levels of control over when and what their toddlers ate and drank. The increased intake by toddlers of a variety of foods as well as the fact that these toddlers were leaner but taller was attributed to the maternal style of feeding which accompanied longer-term breastfeeding (Fisher et al 2000).

Bone density

Researchers have found that the greater the amount of breastmilk infants receive, the greater bone mineral acquisition in the long term.

Dental

The research in this area is incomplete and contradictory, and is ongoing. . Nevertheless bottle-fed babies are significantly more likely to develop caries. Further research is required into all the risk factors for dental caries.

Effects on the mother

Sustained breastfeeding also provides many benefits to the mother including lower risk of anaemia, longer periods of lactational amenorrhea, reduced risk of osteoporosis and breast cancer, promotion of postpartum weight loss and sense of personal achievement



This is a very rough summary of some of this research.. You can read more at http://www.breastfeeding.asn.au/bfinfo/s...





What’s in it for mum?



I’ve mentioned the health benefits, but some things are hard to quantify. Norma Jane Baumgarner, author of “Mothering your nursing toddler” writes: “Nursing is not only a pleasure, but also quite a convenience. A major task in mothering is helping your child several times daily to overcome fears or hurts or exhaustion. There are various ways to comfort a crying child - walking, rocking, singing - but none is easier or more efficient than nursing. It has been described as a little bit of magic on your side: presto, a fussy child is happy again.” and “Being very close to a warm, cuddly child is the advantage mothers like best about extended nursing. “ http://www.naturalchild.org/guest/norma_...



Breastmilk is best for your child, but it doesn’t have to stop until you and your child are ready.



As well as the Australian Breastfeeding Association site I’ve used, Kellymom also has some great information and links on this topic:

http://www.kellymom.com/bf/bfextended/in...

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Merry - posted on 11/01/2010

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What to expect the first year is a REALLY common book here in USA and it gives about ten reason why you should NOT breastfeed past a year.
Lots of myths, wives tales, and out right LIES!
I am disgusted and I don't read the book anymore but I'm sad to say it is like the bible of mothering here and I don't know how it gets by lying like that!
Please don't buy it and don't promote it if you are asked.

Minnie - posted on 10/31/2010

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And in addition to optimal health for the baby, breastfeeding is the culmination of the normal reproductive cycle of a woman. Fewer periods = lower estrogen levels and fewer hormone fluctuations and a lowered risk of developing breast, cervical and ovarian cancer.

Raven - posted on 09/22/2013

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I breastfed my first two kids till four years old. I'm currently nursing my 2 year old daughter. My girls insisted on solids at 4 months, (some rice, gnawing on a pizza crust) which made me feel guilty, but I believe strongly in following your intuition. My son had GERD and he was hard to introduce to solids at six months, so respect their differences. For me I studied attachment theory in grad school and I was deeply effected by the knowledge that strongly attached children do not become mentally ill. My mom had severe mental health issues as did my dad and brother. I have struggled myself. I am not rich, but I can give them my wisdom. If it worked for our ancestors for millions of years why should we mess with that. The "normal" age of breastfeeding for all people has always been 4-5 years. In the industrialized west it has only been fifty years that breastfeeding was driven out in favor of commercial formulas, and this has coincided with awful violence in our world. It's hard in our society, with better living through chemistry drilled into the older generation, and mothering and nurturing looked down on, but we must face the struggle for our kids.

Karla - posted on 05/02/2013

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My daughter is EBF. I looked forward to breast feeding before she was born. I am the first in my family and my boyfriend's family to breastfeed. In the beginning we had no supoort and were acutally judged everytime I pulled my breast out to nurse. I held my ground and told everyone who had an issue with my daughter eating that they could go stare at a wall or something (I wasn't always nice about it). Now that my daughter is getting close to 6 months, I am often asked "how long are you going to do that for?" or "when are you going to pop your T-- out of her mouth?" In my opinion, my daughter's well being is far more important than people being offended or scared of a breast.
When I get snide comments, I wonder off in a tangent about the known benefits of breast feeding and "extended breastfeeding" for the baby and the mother. This typically seems to work at getting the nay sayers to not want to make any negative comments, and most times, actually gets them interested in breastfeeding.

Amy - posted on 12/11/2012

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Ajlaa, don't worry about the milk supply issue! If breastfeeding's going well, then your supply is likely to become *more* reliable. By the time I'd been breastfeeding for more than 18 months (my first, now 3 and a half, breastfed till 2 years 7 months, when I was second trimester pregnant), supply was no issue at all. Even toddlers who feed intermittently (6 feeds one day, 2 the next, 8 the day after...) tend not to mess with Mum's supply too much. The way my local breastfeeding counsellor put it was, "No, your breasts know what they're doing by now, the milk'll go up and down like a yo-yo right along with her". She was right, too. At just over 2, my little girl had a gastro bug, and I suddenly found myself exclusively breastfeeding her for a few days - I had to eat a lot! But solid food was literally going through her. With breastfeeding, she was over it in a few days, and people who didn't know the full story (had assumed she was weaned a long time ago!) were astounded how much weight she *didn't* lose through a few days of diarrhoea and no eating. I had ample supply while exclusively breastfeeding her, and fullness, but no engorgement, once she recovered and went back to two feeds a day.



Don't think about things like the look and feel of your breasts as a sign of supply. Once you've been feeding past 12-18 months, your breasts are amazing efficient. They make milk quickly from the second the child starts sucking, store enough milk sitting around to be a buffer when the child starts, and will probably *never* feel full / hard / bursting / engorged like they did in the early weeks. Please don't let this comparitive 'floppiness' make you doubt your supply!

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[deleted account]

Maybe you should wait. My son loves it too, begs for ninnies but he's older and it's finally time. Don't rush him. It is such a wonderful bond. As long as you stop before third grade he will benefit.

[deleted account]

My 8 yr old son still wakes 2 times a night to suckle for an hour at a time. He is soothed and it calms my nerves too. He only needs a little when he wakes up. I'm considering weaning but I'm nervous we may not continue to be close.

Zoe - posted on 04/24/2014

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But how did you wean her off?? My son is almost 2and I feel the time has come to stop.the problem is how do I take something he loves so much off him????

Marisacherried - posted on 02/02/2014

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I only breastfeed because my daughter is allergic to cows milk, soy, and wont take any of the hypoallergenic infant formula (we tried over a dozen) so shes been EBF since 5 weeks. I dont really feel more attatched or bonded with her when I feed her. shes just eating and im reading or watching tv or whatever. I'll never understand the bizarre passion some people have for it. Id prefer if she had other coping mechanisms besides being on the boob so I can work (she wont drink out of a bottle) etc but I cant for the life of me find an infant or toddler formula without high fructose corn syrup, even the hypoallergenic hospital formula is 48% CORN SYRUP. I'll feed her as long as I need to, since she cant have cows milk anyways but its so much work and makes her so dependent I dont think ill have any more kids unless better alternative formulas come about.

Tamren - posted on 01/07/2014

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I am ebf my almost 3 month old daughter. I also have a son who will be 2 next month. I have pumped and stored my milk in the freezer but my daughter does not take a bottle. I'm thinking of giving it to my son. He was breastfed with supplementing formula till 6 months then just formula. Is giving him my milk now a good idea?

Mabel - posted on 01/06/2014

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My baby is 19mths now and im still bf, mostly in the night. The thing is I really want to conceive again and we have been tryin since my baby was 8mths. My period came after 6wks, should I stop bf b/4 I can get pregnant again?

Jennifer - posted on 12/27/2013

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Maureen,
I know you posted this almost 9 months ago, while perhaps for the benefit of others, I will reply.
Not only do the health benefits for mom and baby continue past 1 year old.
The World Health Organization recommends till at least 2 years old.
Even formula manufacturers make formula for toddlers as they have recognized babies need more than cows milk for health purposes beyond the first year.

Ambur - posted on 11/05/2013

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The doctor told me that I could give him milk, soymilk or ricemilk now. He told me that he should still be drinking a milk like substance for fluid. Why would I wean at a year if he still needs a milk like food? He's just over a year and shows no sign of stopping breastfeeding.

Donna - posted on 10/21/2013

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It's not just physical health benefits, there are also the emotional benefits....for both mom and baby. It's an easy way to calm a child for any reason. Why would I give up an easy sure-fire way to ease a difficult situation? It makes so much sense for toddlers who really do not understand logic. By the time they wean, they may be that much more able to cope in general. I never understood why anyone would stop doing something that helps make mothering easier on so many levels.

Nadiya - posted on 10/15/2013

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fed the first for 18 mths. Most astounding benefit was his quick recovery from minor colds, flu etc

Joanne - posted on 09/20/2013

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@karla kraemer I wonder if a lot of the people who snicker realize the benefits of breastfeeding? My grandmother didn't breastfeed and had no idea at all about the benefits vs formula feeding and when I explained them to her she was mor accepting to the idea. I agree with you 100% if you are uncomfortable why are you staring ? Look away this is to benefit my child and I will not stop doing something that is so healthy and natural for him to please someone else.

Joanne - posted on 09/20/2013

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This was amazingly helpful my son is only 2 months old and I have heard horror stories about Doctors who don't believe in breastfeeding past 1 year. The one doctor asked a friend of mine who still breastfeeds her 2 year old if she does it "just for fun." After you wean them don't you generally give them milk in some other form anyway whether it be cows milk,soy, almond, etc?So I was wondering myself if there is any benefit to breastfeeding past the first year. Thanks for the info!

Kelly - posted on 09/16/2013

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I'm new to the circle of moms, but find this infomation to be very informative. I hope to educate myself with as much knowlege as possible before my son arrives in November. If anyone has any suggestions as to how to post questions, please advise.

Thank you for you input.

Melynda - posted on 09/11/2013

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I breastfeed our first daughter till she was 3 yrs old. The reason we stopped was i was prego w our 2 nd daughter and my belly got in her way and we decided to " save the rest of milk for baby" as my daughter put it.

Alexia J - posted on 09/03/2013

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My Son still breastfeeds and he is 14 months old :-) My sons Father says that he gets absolutely nothing from being breastfed after 12 months... I told him to get a CLUE!!

Samantha - posted on 08/04/2013

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LOL, if the benefits just stopped after one year, my almost 13 month old would have starved to death by now, she still nurses 5-6x a day....oh and she is 90-100 percentile in height and weight and still has her chubby cheeks and thighs, walks and understands two languages.

Larra - posted on 08/02/2013

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My 13months still like being breastfed .my oldest i breast fed till he. was 2 n now he's 4yrs n say its nasty

Sasi - posted on 04/29/2013

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when my son was born my mother told me, the baby looks beautiful to her mother when she sleeps, she can watch her all day long.
but as i b.feed my son, he seems to be the most beautiful thing on this planet for me i can see his peaceful beautiful face all day long. can not describe the feeling when he see me while feeding, blinks his eyes, holds my fingers. my words can not describe what i feel that moment its just beyond words.
i don't want to get out of this feeling.
i will sure feed him for 2 years or more. if it was about me i would stop feeding him this moment but its about him, to decide when needs to stop. i don't even listen to any one, no suggestions no comments i would pass a smile. i believe this is very personal matter of we both :)
it is completely fine for me, 2 or more years, how long he is going to feed? whole life? these 2 years are going to pass in the blink of an eye. He is 13 months now but seems like yesterday the day he was born i still have the fresh feeling of it.
he loves the feed like crazy. we both are enjoying it a lot because we know this second year is going to fly away :) he is growing fast, we want to make the most out of our time together. i love you my baby, my world.

Maureen - posted on 04/26/2013

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Any words of advice when confronted by family members/friends who don't support bf past a year? My son is 11 months and my MIL is not supportive in general and my SIL is constantly telling me I need to wean him once he is a year old. I either get very defensive or try to change the subject. I often get very emotional because I feel I am always on the defense and don't know what to say. I don't want to have to keep bf in secret just to appease my close-minded family/friends. I because I believe he should decide when he's ready to wean and he is the happiest baby, so I know I'm doing something right. Any advice would be appreciated!

Hannah - posted on 03/07/2013

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I plan on breastfeeding my daughter until she is two at least, unless she stops on her own before then. With all I've read I would have a hard time justifying weaning her. I have a chance to impact her future by continuing as long as I can. Why wouldn't I give her that? But also I think any amount of time that you've spend breastfeeding is a wonderful thing.

Allison - posted on 03/04/2013

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I breast fed my son for 12 months. The day after his first birthday, he refused to nurse. He wanted to play and was happy enough with this pacifier (dummy). I was sad but it really was his decision. My daughter wouldn't use a pacifier and she wanted to nurse until 2 years and 3 months. Then she said her brother told her it was gross and she wanted to stop. Anyway, they are both happy and very healthy kids. Letting the kids decide worked for us.

Celeste - posted on 02/27/2013

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That's great that your child is fine. That's not the point of the thread. The point of the thread is that it's OK for children to nurse past a year. Many times, moms are told by medical professionals, friends and family that mama's milk loses its nutrition when this is clearly not the case. If mom doesn't want to nurse past a year, or it didn't work out for some reason, that's fine, too. There's just so much misinformation out there.

[deleted account]

I breastfed my first child till he was 11 months old I wanted to do it for a year but he stopped by himself. I was frantic and took him to dieticians and paediatricians trying to get him back on the breast but he was just not interested. Finally his doctor said as long as he is eating his solids and drinking fluids he does not need me any more and so we decided to just let him be.

And today he is nearly 3, active, healthy (really he hardly ever gets sick) and is doing fine. I guess they can do fine if one decides to only breastfeed for a year

Nicole - posted on 02/02/2013

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My first daughter weaned herself early, but my new born seems to love hr some breast. As for how long I would breast feed, definitely till she tells me she have had enough.

Kari - posted on 12/10/2012

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i have that book and breast fed my first til he weaned himself at 16 months (I was a month preggers) and am currently still nursing my almost 15 month old...I don't recall seeing reasons why not to nurse...I shall have to read it again I guess

Amelie - posted on 11/29/2012

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I personally knew when it was time for me to wean my children. This happened between 2 and 2/12 years for each of them, totaling over a decade. I had always enjoyed nursing but there came a day where it just wasn't comfortable for me anymore, I just plain old wasn't enjoying it anymore. And I knew it was time. I certainly don't believe that I nursed them past a year to deal with attachment issues or because I was obsessed with bfing. I cannot remember a single time when any of my kids tried to get the ninny out in public, not that I shied away from nursing anywhere, but they always had manners about it (good table manners start young lol)

My nursing for years and your weaning early is not meant to be a slight on your parenting or your child. I am thankful so many babies thrive on formula seeing as so many moms choose it.

Jomana - posted on 11/16/2012

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i totally agree ...breastfeeding is the best. i love the bond it creats between mom and kid its magical when he is so close and feels safe amazing also its money saving benefit as u know how baby milk is sooo expensive and its less tiring getting up at night warming water washing the formula and all the headache and for me i beleive breastfeeding until 2 is the perfect age but who cares if u kept it a bit longer its ur decision and as long as u dont mind it to hell with others coz only u. know ur kid and what is best for them...my only thing i hate bout breastfeeding is doing it outside coz lots of ppl give u the look that they are uncofortable with it even when am all covered with this amazinly stylish breastfeeding cover i jus dont feel good doing it in public but again my child is more important than what strangers may feel

Roxi - posted on 11/15/2012

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Still breastfeeding at 17 months! Even though my Mom and sisters are sort of telling me to stop breastfeeding because he's old enough, I still do breastfeed him because it's what he wants and it works for us. It does help me comfort him when he gets hurt or scared. It also makes us much more closer than he is to his Dad which is very biased since he obviously doesn't have the breasts and milk! I'll continue breastfeeding for as long as he wants to.

Melanie - posted on 10/20/2012

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I found a chart on a blog a while back that I really like. It explains ALL of the reaons for extended breastfeeding for the toddler. It made me so happy to see. I've been nursing my 28 month old since birth, with very few complications, and tandem-nursing her and her sister for the past 10 months. It is a major joy to know I am giving my daughter the best.



Here is a link for the blog picture... Courtesy of The Alpha Parent.

http://www.thealphaparent.com/2012/03/di...

Michelle - posted on 06/23/2012

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My daughter turned 2 in may, she stopped day feeds around one (at that point she was getting it with afternoon and morning tea). For the next year she was only getting it at night and in the last 2 months we have been getting her to sleep in her own bed so she was only getting breast in the morning when I wanted that extra hour or 2 sleep, the last 2 nights she hasn't had any. I'm actually feeling better now than I did for the last few months, that could be because my daughter is in her own bed or because she isnt getting breastmilk. I loved breastfeeding that far but it was starting to get painful and i felt it was draining me. I felt good feeding that long becuase she was getting her nutrients she needed and she was also getting multivitamins which she has had ever since we started to not give her as much breastmilk.

User - posted on 06/16/2012

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My son turned 1 this month and I am still breastfeeding! Thanks! I feel much better about him getting all his nutrients!

Celeste - posted on 06/14/2012

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Kathi, this isn't about which is better. This post is support for moms who nurse past a year and that it's OK and still good for babies. There is so much misinformation out there (ie. breastmilk loses nutrition after x months or x years, mom is only doing it for herself, etc etc).

Ajlaa - posted on 06/14/2012

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My daughter is only 5 months and i am planning to BF till 2 years. Hoping for enough milk supply!

Kathi - posted on 06/13/2012

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I'm a new FTM and wanted to say hello. I am breast feeding and formula feeding my daughter and she's doing great switching back and forth. She eats like a champ! Before she was born I didn't think I was going to breast feed at all, but I am actually enjoying it. I do have to say though, as a formula fed baby (both my husband and me) I also enjoy debating the pros and cons of things. My hubby and I are both very intelligent (he has a genius level IQ), creative, well rounded, and socially adept individuals with college degrees, etc. and we have minimal health problems and great relationships with our families. In fact my mom is staying with us for a month to help out. A lot of being healthy and well adjusted is about genetics and how one is raised and nurtured by good parents, not just about BF. Remember we were both exclusively bottle fed because that's what people did in the 70s. Anyway, I am happy to a part of the group and I hope we can all be supportive of each other's choices even if we don't always agree! :)

Liz - posted on 06/01/2012

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I'm pregnant with my third and plan on breast feeding all 3 at once!! : ) "Tandem nursing" sounds ike an intimidating concept, but it's really a lot less work than preparing extra meals and snacks all day and I just couldn't deny my babies something I knew they weren't ready to give up. My 2.5 year old only nurses a few times a day, but I'm so happy he's still interested, especially since it's given me an excuse to give his doctor about wanting to put off vaccines as long as possible!!

Cori Hughes - posted on 05/28/2012

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I stopped BF when my son was about 8 months. Not by choice though. My supply went down and he would only nurse on one side because that breat made enough, and came out fast enough for him. I tried herbal remmidies as well as medication, to no avail. However, I still have milk when I squeez my boobs, and he is 2 1/2. I am thinking about trying to pump and give it to him that way. If it was up to me I'd still be nursing!!

Erica - posted on 05/20/2012

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Alice- I'm glad that worked for you. I too had my son on formula at 5 months, but it was not by choice. He had a failure to thrive condition that kept him on formula for 5 months after we began. I personally felt like a failure as a mother for not producing enough breast milk to adequately feed my baby and keep up with his demands. I still tried nursing him as much as possible during that time though. Then after 5 months of formula supplementing, he tried solid foods and loved them! At that point he quit formula in a very short time, started feeding himself solid foods about 3 times a day (at 10months) AND went back to breastfeeding on demand. We're now 17mos into our breastfeeding on demand (and yes, he still loves real people food, and snacks. I swear he's in the middle of a constant growth spurt because he's always eating).

Children who are ebf are known to have better health, higher IQ in school-related testing, better social skills, more independent and better self confidence. I come from a family of 4 kids where each of us were breastfed until at least 3yrs old and we are all grown, well-rounded and highly educated people. We also all adore our mother and she is also my best friend. No attachment issues found, just good solid time in infancy and toddler-hood in which to build a strong bond and trusting relationship with our mother, through breastfeeding. ;) If you want more proof, check out www.kellymom.com.

Anna - posted on 05/15/2012

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baby girl is 13 1/2 months now and still refusing any other milk but mine. sticks her tongue out if she has cowsmilk even.. I would like to stop soon but seems she is still very dependant on my milk and she is a very fussy eater too. I am worries she will not get enough variety if she stops feeding, she has refused to eat food off the spoon since a very little baby,and have only accepted things she can feed herself,+fruit from tubes etc +yougurt..but this is my 4th child and I have fed all for 14 moths,so feel I have done a good enough job. maybe she will be more adventurous with her food when she stops feeding..she will not eat vegetables and fruit pieces as she doesnt like touching them..I dont understand how other mothers manage to get their babies to swich from breast to formula so easily as mine would never touch the stuff-swear she would rather starve herself! crossing fingers she will ease up on her feeding during the day soon,but dont mind it at night.

Nicole - posted on 05/14/2012

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The World Health Organization recommends that TWO years be the Minimum amount of time a baby nurses. They must be crazy over attached women.... oh wait they are a mix of men and women that are very very educated. Due to the virgin gut of an infant, babies should be fed absolutely nothing but human milk for the first six months. For the record, nursing a three year old isn't always a delight. However, I keep in mind that she will not nurse forever and press on. Her stellar health and development make every feed worth it. Breastmilk is NOT best. It is the biological standard. It is every baby's birthright.

Nicole - posted on 05/14/2012

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Ina May Gaskin's Guide to Breastfeeding is legendary. I cannot speak highly enough of it.

Bobmusicgirl4 - posted on 05/12/2012

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Alice, there's nothing "to get" about breastfeeding, it's a personal choice sweetie. I've recently found that there's been some dangerous stuff in formula- but I'm not criticising you for choosing that for your 5 month old, now am I? I think the whole point of this was to inform people and for others to share their experience....this isn't a trolling thread.

Bobmusicgirl4 - posted on 05/12/2012

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To each her own I suppose....I personally can't breastfeed anymore and am not guilty about it at all. I breastfed my son for 8+ months and eventually couldn't keep my production up for him because he was a 95 percentile boy and I'm about 125 pounds. I couldn't eat enough to keep myself from feeling lightheaded so I just slowly weaned him off. I rarely used formula, only during the weaning process. He's 2 now of course so this was a while ago.
Personally, I think that people are extroardinarly nosy asking that type of question- "When are you going to stop breastfeeding?"
I just respond with: "When are you going to be able to tell when sheet is appropriate?" (you know what I mean...)
I wish people would just mind their own business because what may be good for you, just might not be the same for the next person. I personally think it's rude to ask such a personal question.

Toni - posted on 05/06/2012

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My daughter is 14 months old . and i still nurse her. and will continue to do so for as long as possible.

Marissa - posted on 05/06/2012

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Thank you. This really relieves me. I have a relative who recently asked when I was going to stop breastfeeding. I told her when my daughter and I both feel its time. She then proceeded to tell me I shouldn't be breastfeeding anymore and that I'll spoil her and ruin her teeth when she gets them. Zoey is only 7 months old. It really discouraged me but this was a relief to read.

User - posted on 04/26/2012

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My son is almost 3 and i still breast feed, breast fed children tend to smaller because they dont gorge themselves on milk and have small amounts instead of a big feed. Bottle fed children tend to have more weight issues later in life then breast fed children (the parent tends to make the child drink the whole bottle of milk).

Celeste - posted on 04/26/2012

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Alice, this thread is not for you to criticize others for nursing past a year. This thread is to inform the benefits of nursing past a year. If you don't want to nurse past whatever age, great. But, please don't insult or judge those that do.

Alice - posted on 04/26/2012

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Everyone can hate me but I don't get the obsession with breastfeeding. I agree that breast milk provides everything that the baby needs but it seems like if you do it over a year it's because the mom is the one that has trouble with detachment. I don't want my toddler asking for my tit out in public. I breastfed for 5 months and then switched to formula. My daughter is doing fantastic!

Melissa - posted on 04/19/2012

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The longer you breastfeed over your lifetime the lower your risk for breast cancer is.

User - posted on 04/17/2012

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I'm still happily nursing my 21 month old son. It's great for tantrums, when he is clearly just tired and overwhelmed. It also provides a nice way to transition from go go go to naptime/bedtime. He is also a somewhat picky eater when it comes to veggies and fruit. I eat VERY healthy, I love knowing that he is getting needed nutrition through my breast milk. He is basically never sick! I think he will probably wean sometime after two.

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