Breastfeediing Myths

Brenda - posted on 11/24/2009 ( 126 moms have responded )

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So, what is the craziest, or most terrible brestfeeding myth or misinformation you've ever heard? Lets put together the worst of the bunch, but you don't have to only post the worst, post any of the common ones too!

Worst one I've heard personally:

Lady at my local WIC office said they had a young woman who was told, and completely believed, that if you wanted to nurse your baby, they clipped the tip of your nipples off after the baby was born so the milk could come out.

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Nicole - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting Lisa:



Quoting dani:




Quoting Lisa:

Hmmm...the tresillian link is to a family care service- that trumps the medical advice of the Australian Medical Association, the WHO, and UNICEF?

I do understand that what works for one does not work for all, but I do believe that when advice is given that contradicts sound current research that accurate information needs to be given.








My lord, Lisa, how rude you are. Not everyone who disagrees with you is an idiot or just making things up as they go, you know.








 








Tresillian is an arm of NSW Health, which is a state government department. Their work is actually based on very sound research. As I noted before, even scientists disagree with each other on lots of issues. That's how science progresses. Btw, I only recently stopped breastfeeding (my daughter is 15 months) and I'm a great supporter of it. But I'm here to support people and be supported, not trumpet my own views (even though mine, like yours, are supported by sound scientific research) as if they are gospel.









Not sure how my above comment was rude.  A disagreement makes me rude? I looked over that website, the research studies they provided and nothing shows me that the services and authority they provide is anything more than an average family or pediatric practitioner. My daughter's first doctor pushed solids at four months, told me to let her cry herself to sleep at seven months, and pushed weaning at one year. Sure, there has been 'research' that people have used to justify such practices, but current, well carried out research suggests breastfeeding on demand, breastfeeding past a year, and that CIO is dangerous to an infant.

Just because her doctor suggested those things, and the fact that someone somewhere did research to support their cause does not mean that it was sound information that my daughter's doctor provided me with. And that's what I see in the tresillian family care center's tips. Their tip sheets provide no research. However, the AMA, WHO, UNICEF, AAP, LLLI all provide extensive research and citations within their policy statements.

To me, the tresillian link is not a credible resource for parenting information. That's not me being rude.





Agree with Lisa 100%!!!!!!!!!!!!  I might be an idiot but I don't even know who NSW Health is!  But I know all of the organizations Lisa mentioned.  Very well. 



Dani, please know that I not only base my decision against scheduling feeds because of those organizations, but by experience as well.  I have counseled clients with failure to thrive infants because of scheduling feeds.  We are trying to make sure that doesn't happen to a woman's beloved LO.



It is always okay to admit if we are wrong and if I ever see any sound evidence that says it's okay to schedule feeds, I will admit my error.  Until then, I will encourage feeding on demand.

Minnie - posted on 12/01/2009

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I think that what many are forgetting regarding breastfeeding as a form of birth control is that there is no birth control method save abstinence that is 100% reliable. And that each method has to be carried out a specific way for maximum effectiveness. Birth control pills need to be taken at the same time every day, and are about 98% effective when used correctly. The condom, needs to be put on at a certain time, can't be reused, etc. and is only about 86% effective when used correctly.



Ecological breastfeeding requires a very specific set of lifestyle choices and actions for it to be an effective form of birth control, and when these rules are followed, it is a very effective method- 99% effective if the baby is under 6 months and 94% effective if the baby is older than six months.



Of course women become pregnant while breastfeeding- many women don't follow the strict rules of ecological breastfeeding, and even if they do, it is not 100% effective. Women get pregnant on any other form of birth control as well.



So to say that ecological breastfeeding is not a form of birth control because it is not 100% effective is to say that the pill, the condom, injections, diaphragm are not birth control methods as well.

Brenda - posted on 11/30/2009

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Quoting Sara:

Thank you so much Teresa! Sometimes it seems people on here think one way is best and that is their way. I appreciate what you said.



It isn't a matter of thinking one way, however, it is taking the advice of the WHO and the American Academy of Pediatrics.  This whole thread is about "myths" associated with breastfeeding. It is a myth that Scheduled feedings cause no harm.  They can.  That is a simple fact.  No one said anything about scheduled feedings not working at all, they can work for some babies.  No one attacked you for choosing to use scheduled feedings, and it worked for you, and that is great.  However, the whole idea is the get out some of the worst things that are not true that the majority of mothers might hear and think are correct.  Just like doctors used to recommend fifteen minutes on one breast then fifteen on the other, doctors used to recommend scheduled feeding for breastfed infants.  This has led to many mothers giving it up in response to being unable to either produce milk or satisfy their infants.  Therefore, it is in the best interest to not use the blanket statement that scheduled feeds are safe for all mothers.  It simply isn't true.  Just like the choice to offer milk in a bottle, it does not work for all.

Brenda - posted on 11/30/2009

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Quoting Sara:



Quoting Nicole:




Quoting Lisa:





Quoting Sara:

"16. Putting your baby on a feeding schedule doesn't have any negative effect on your milk supply."

My daughter did just fine on a schedule until she was weaned at almost a year. And the only reason we weaned was because I was going out of town for a week. It had nothing to do with my supply.










The fact of the matter is that many women cannot maintain adequate milk production while scheduling feedings. All of the major health organizations and LLLI recommend feeding an infant on-demand. 










I am glad to hear that your baby was fine by being scheduled, but scheduling an infant's feeds just isn't in the best interest of an infant who will need to increase feedings during a growth spurt. This is why the book On Becoming Babywise was condemned by the AAP in 2005.












True.  While we are very glad that scheduling worked well for you, Sara, in most cases it does not.  Therefore, we will still be safe in saying that "putting a baby on a feeding schedule doesn't have any negative effect on your milk supply" is a myth.









Apparently my experiences are not valid.






Scheduled feeds work whenever a baby that can handle them is put on a schedule.  It may be that your baby and you just happened to match the schedule.  If so, great.  But the majority of breastfeeding mothers cannot schedule feeds without endangering their milk supply and health of babies.  Babywise (which I would like to take and start a fire with) has been shown to lead to Faiilure to Thrive and infant dehydration because of the way that the guy (who is not a medical professional) tells you to schedule feeds.  The fact is, some babies cannot handle a schedule.  Some have a natural schedule that meshes with the parent's desire, and that's great.  When it idoesn't mesh, you end up with some major problems.  Wonderful that it worked, but you cannot make the blanket statement that scheduled feeding does not harm babies because it MAY and has harmed plenty babies enough that doctors tell you not to do it.  It has sent more than one baby to the emergency room, thus it cannot be said it is harmless.

Brenda - posted on 11/30/2009

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Quoting dani:



Quoting Mandy:

i was told yesterday that my 10mo (who has never had formula and never will) NEEDS a bottle to sleep through the night. and havihng him in my bed is a BIG mistake. i prompty moved away from that lady before my son got kicked off his cricket team for him mum punching a stupid lady :o)






Hmmm. Never say never, Mandy. I planned to breastfeed exclusively - and I managed right until two weeks before six months, when I then needed to introduce formula as well. It's not so terrible! Of course, breast is best, but if you set yourself - and your baby - up to ONLY get breastmilk, you might end up disappointed, when it's actually not THAT big a deal.






 






Re co-sleeping: there's actually been some VERY recent research in Australia about this, and it appears that it's not as safe as previously thought. I don't think they're necessarily saying don't do it, but you might need to consider other factors. Sorry - unsure of where the research was from but it was reported in the Sydney Morning Herald - you might look there to start if yuo're interested.






 






Best of luck and yes, try not to punch people, no matter how much they deserve it (at least not in front of the kids!)





Unfortunately, that advice on cosleeping was flawed and has been recanted by a couple articles recently.  The theories showing it is not safe are misinterpretations of data.  I do not have a link to the source, but the reports were vastly incorrect.  The studies that show cosleeping as to be unsafe are being proven to NOT take into account the things that make cosleeping unsafe.  When you take out babies injured cosleeping in unsafe ways, ie when drugs, alcohol, morbid obesiity, sleeping on improper surfaces, and other variables are taken out, the rate of cosleeping injuries drops LOWER than crib related injuries.  Just like you would not put your child in an unsafe crib, you should  no cosleep without safety in mind.

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Minnie - posted on 12/04/2009

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Quoting Kayla:



Quoting Brenda:




Quoting Kayla:





Quoting Lisa:






Quoting Kayla:







Quoting Lisa:








Quoting Nicole:

I also know of a family denistry office (a big one in my city), that tells breastfeeding mothers that nursing at night can cause tooth decay! I told the hygenist "although I have no education or prior training in denistry or orthodontics, everything that I have been taught about breastfeeding is that it actually promotes better orthodontic health". She was not moved. I also told her that I breastfed for well beyond the time teeth erupted in my children's mouths (and most of that breastfeeding was done at night) and they have yet to have a cavaty or any sign of tooth decay!

All I could do was picture some poor mother who has brought her breastfed baby in for some form of check up and the dentist's office telling her that breastfeeding at night will cause her baby to have tooth decay, so what does she do??? She weans and puts her baby on a bottle and REALLY DOES cause her baby to have tooth decay.

Sometimes it's the medical professionals that give some of the worst advice!















At the beginning of November I attended the ME NH area LLL conference and one session was on dental caries. It was soooo informative.
















I learned that dental caries are actually caused by a bacteria called streptococcous mutans, and people have varying amounts of this bacteria in their mouths.  We pick it up when our mothers kiss us, and when we share food.  Some people have a virulant strain of s. mutans, and they are very prone to tooth decay no matter how careful they are with diet and brushing.
















They found that 71% of breastfed children are actually protected by the human milk, 30% were very protected, and only 10% actually got caries from nursing, and these children had the virile strain of s. mutans. However, this 10% would have been worse if they had been given formula instead of breastmilk.
















-Breastmilk contains secretory IGA which is an immune component
















-B12 Binding protein which binds s. mutans in saliva
















-The fatty acids in breastmilk lyse bacteria
















-Fibronectin causes macrophages to consume bacteria
















-Lactoferrin interferes with the bacteria absorbing necessary iron
















-Mucins bind to bacteria
















I could write pages on what I learned!
















Basically- if you've got the virile strain of s.mutans there's not much you can do save preventetive maintenance and fillings, but it's better to continue to breastfeed because not breastfeeding would be worse.





















you can get the streptococcous whilr your pregnant. your ob/gyn is suppose to check you for it at anywhere from 36-38weeks



















They test for Group B streptococcous- not Streptococcous mutans.  A different organism.















my doc. tested for ALL streptococcous. so dont tell me he didnt













Well, your doctor did more than most.  ALL I had both times was Group B strep, and that's the only test I've ever seen anyone get.  I don't think the Step mutans can be tested for with a vaginal swab since it is located in the mouth....










i had strep on my legs and i had strepthroat while i was pregnant so when that happens they have to check everywhere.





I'm not exactly sure what you're trying to argue here, Kayla.  It is a fact that s. mutans is the cause of dental caries. Nearly everyone has an amount of this bacteria in his or her mouth.  It's not something that affects pregnancy. Anyways, the saliva is tested to confirm S. mutans. But it's really a non-issue, since we pick it up from our mothers and live with it all our lives. 

Amanda - posted on 12/04/2009

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Quoting Jackie:

"You cant eat a lot of chocolate when breastfeeding because the baby will get chocolate milk lol"



Obviously my babe is a chocoholic, 'cause I am too! ;-) lol

Kayla - posted on 12/03/2009

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Quoting Brenda:



Quoting Kayla:




Quoting Lisa:





Quoting Kayla:






Quoting Lisa:







Quoting Nicole:

I also know of a family denistry office (a big one in my city), that tells breastfeeding mothers that nursing at night can cause tooth decay! I told the hygenist "although I have no education or prior training in denistry or orthodontics, everything that I have been taught about breastfeeding is that it actually promotes better orthodontic health". She was not moved. I also told her that I breastfed for well beyond the time teeth erupted in my children's mouths (and most of that breastfeeding was done at night) and they have yet to have a cavaty or any sign of tooth decay!

All I could do was picture some poor mother who has brought her breastfed baby in for some form of check up and the dentist's office telling her that breastfeeding at night will cause her baby to have tooth decay, so what does she do??? She weans and puts her baby on a bottle and REALLY DOES cause her baby to have tooth decay.

Sometimes it's the medical professionals that give some of the worst advice!













At the beginning of November I attended the ME NH area LLL conference and one session was on dental caries. It was soooo informative.














I learned that dental caries are actually caused by a bacteria called streptococcous mutans, and people have varying amounts of this bacteria in their mouths.  We pick it up when our mothers kiss us, and when we share food.  Some people have a virulant strain of s. mutans, and they are very prone to tooth decay no matter how careful they are with diet and brushing.














They found that 71% of breastfed children are actually protected by the human milk, 30% were very protected, and only 10% actually got caries from nursing, and these children had the virile strain of s. mutans. However, this 10% would have been worse if they had been given formula instead of breastmilk.














-Breastmilk contains secretory IGA which is an immune component














-B12 Binding protein which binds s. mutans in saliva














-The fatty acids in breastmilk lyse bacteria














-Fibronectin causes macrophages to consume bacteria














-Lactoferrin interferes with the bacteria absorbing necessary iron














-Mucins bind to bacteria














I could write pages on what I learned!














Basically- if you've got the virile strain of s.mutans there's not much you can do save preventetive maintenance and fillings, but it's better to continue to breastfeed because not breastfeeding would be worse.


















you can get the streptococcous whilr your pregnant. your ob/gyn is suppose to check you for it at anywhere from 36-38weeks
















They test for Group B streptococcous- not Streptococcous mutans.  A different organism.












my doc. tested for ALL streptococcous. so dont tell me he didnt










Well, your doctor did more than most.  ALL I had both times was Group B strep, and that's the only test I've ever seen anyone get.  I don't think the Step mutans can be tested for with a vaginal swab since it is located in the mouth....






i had strep on my legs and i had strepthroat while i was pregnant so when that happens they have to check everywhere.

Brenda - posted on 12/03/2009

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Quoting Kayla:



Quoting Lisa:




Quoting Kayla:





Quoting Lisa:






Quoting Nicole:

I also know of a family denistry office (a big one in my city), that tells breastfeeding mothers that nursing at night can cause tooth decay! I told the hygenist "although I have no education or prior training in denistry or orthodontics, everything that I have been taught about breastfeeding is that it actually promotes better orthodontic health". She was not moved. I also told her that I breastfed for well beyond the time teeth erupted in my children's mouths (and most of that breastfeeding was done at night) and they have yet to have a cavaty or any sign of tooth decay!

All I could do was picture some poor mother who has brought her breastfed baby in for some form of check up and the dentist's office telling her that breastfeeding at night will cause her baby to have tooth decay, so what does she do??? She weans and puts her baby on a bottle and REALLY DOES cause her baby to have tooth decay.

Sometimes it's the medical professionals that give some of the worst advice!











At the beginning of November I attended the ME NH area LLL conference and one session was on dental caries. It was soooo informative.












I learned that dental caries are actually caused by a bacteria called streptococcous mutans, and people have varying amounts of this bacteria in their mouths.  We pick it up when our mothers kiss us, and when we share food.  Some people have a virulant strain of s. mutans, and they are very prone to tooth decay no matter how careful they are with diet and brushing.












They found that 71% of breastfed children are actually protected by the human milk, 30% were very protected, and only 10% actually got caries from nursing, and these children had the virile strain of s. mutans. However, this 10% would have been worse if they had been given formula instead of breastmilk.












-Breastmilk contains secretory IGA which is an immune component












-B12 Binding protein which binds s. mutans in saliva












-The fatty acids in breastmilk lyse bacteria












-Fibronectin causes macrophages to consume bacteria












-Lactoferrin interferes with the bacteria absorbing necessary iron












-Mucins bind to bacteria












I could write pages on what I learned!












Basically- if you've got the virile strain of s.mutans there's not much you can do save preventetive maintenance and fillings, but it's better to continue to breastfeed because not breastfeeding would be worse.















you can get the streptococcous whilr your pregnant. your ob/gyn is suppose to check you for it at anywhere from 36-38weeks













They test for Group B streptococcous- not Streptococcous mutans.  A different organism.









my doc. tested for ALL streptococcous. so dont tell me he didnt






Well, your doctor did more than most.  ALL I had both times was Group B strep, and that's the only test I've ever seen anyone get.  I don't think the Step mutans can be tested for with a vaginal swab since it is located in the mouth....

Kayla - posted on 12/03/2009

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Quoting Lisa:



Quoting Kayla:




Quoting Lisa:





Quoting Nicole:

I also know of a family denistry office (a big one in my city), that tells breastfeeding mothers that nursing at night can cause tooth decay! I told the hygenist "although I have no education or prior training in denistry or orthodontics, everything that I have been taught about breastfeeding is that it actually promotes better orthodontic health". She was not moved. I also told her that I breastfed for well beyond the time teeth erupted in my children's mouths (and most of that breastfeeding was done at night) and they have yet to have a cavaty or any sign of tooth decay!

All I could do was picture some poor mother who has brought her breastfed baby in for some form of check up and the dentist's office telling her that breastfeeding at night will cause her baby to have tooth decay, so what does she do??? She weans and puts her baby on a bottle and REALLY DOES cause her baby to have tooth decay.

Sometimes it's the medical professionals that give some of the worst advice!









At the beginning of November I attended the ME NH area LLL conference and one session was on dental caries. It was soooo informative.










I learned that dental caries are actually caused by a bacteria called streptococcous mutans, and people have varying amounts of this bacteria in their mouths.  We pick it up when our mothers kiss us, and when we share food.  Some people have a virulant strain of s. mutans, and they are very prone to tooth decay no matter how careful they are with diet and brushing.










They found that 71% of breastfed children are actually protected by the human milk, 30% were very protected, and only 10% actually got caries from nursing, and these children had the virile strain of s. mutans. However, this 10% would have been worse if they had been given formula instead of breastmilk.










-Breastmilk contains secretory IGA which is an immune component










-B12 Binding protein which binds s. mutans in saliva










-The fatty acids in breastmilk lyse bacteria










-Fibronectin causes macrophages to consume bacteria










-Lactoferrin interferes with the bacteria absorbing necessary iron










-Mucins bind to bacteria










I could write pages on what I learned!










Basically- if you've got the virile strain of s.mutans there's not much you can do save preventetive maintenance and fillings, but it's better to continue to breastfeed because not breastfeeding would be worse.












you can get the streptococcous whilr your pregnant. your ob/gyn is suppose to check you for it at anywhere from 36-38weeks










They test for Group B streptococcous- not Streptococcous mutans.  A different organism.





my doc. tested for ALL streptococcous. so dont tell me he didnt

Kayla - posted on 12/03/2009

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Quoting dani:



Quoting Lisa:

Hmmm...the tresillian link is to a family care service- that trumps the medical advice of the Australian Medical Association, the WHO, and UNICEF?

I do understand that what works for one does not work for all, but I do believe that when advice is given that contradicts sound current research that accurate information needs to be given.






My lord, Lisa, how rude you are. Not everyone who disagrees with you is an idiot or just making things up as they go, you know.






 






Tresillian is an arm of NSW Health, which is a state government department. Their work is actually based on very sound research. As I noted before, even scientists disagree with each other on lots of issues. That's how science progresses. Btw, I only recently stopped breastfeeding (my daughter is 15 months) and I'm a great supporter of it. But I'm here to support people and be supported, not trumpet my own views (even though mine, like yours, are supported by sound scientific research) as if they are gospel.





dani that is very true. just because we dont do it a certain way/ or just like everyone else doesnt make us horrible mothers.

Minnie - posted on 12/03/2009

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Quoting Kayla:



Quoting Lisa:




Quoting Nicole:

I also know of a family denistry office (a big one in my city), that tells breastfeeding mothers that nursing at night can cause tooth decay! I told the hygenist "although I have no education or prior training in denistry or orthodontics, everything that I have been taught about breastfeeding is that it actually promotes better orthodontic health". She was not moved. I also told her that I breastfed for well beyond the time teeth erupted in my children's mouths (and most of that breastfeeding was done at night) and they have yet to have a cavaty or any sign of tooth decay!

All I could do was picture some poor mother who has brought her breastfed baby in for some form of check up and the dentist's office telling her that breastfeeding at night will cause her baby to have tooth decay, so what does she do??? She weans and puts her baby on a bottle and REALLY DOES cause her baby to have tooth decay.

Sometimes it's the medical professionals that give some of the worst advice!







At the beginning of November I attended the ME NH area LLL conference and one session was on dental caries. It was soooo informative.








I learned that dental caries are actually caused by a bacteria called streptococcous mutans, and people have varying amounts of this bacteria in their mouths.  We pick it up when our mothers kiss us, and when we share food.  Some people have a virulant strain of s. mutans, and they are very prone to tooth decay no matter how careful they are with diet and brushing.








They found that 71% of breastfed children are actually protected by the human milk, 30% were very protected, and only 10% actually got caries from nursing, and these children had the virile strain of s. mutans. However, this 10% would have been worse if they had been given formula instead of breastmilk.








-Breastmilk contains secretory IGA which is an immune component








-B12 Binding protein which binds s. mutans in saliva








-The fatty acids in breastmilk lyse bacteria








-Fibronectin causes macrophages to consume bacteria








-Lactoferrin interferes with the bacteria absorbing necessary iron








-Mucins bind to bacteria








I could write pages on what I learned!








Basically- if you've got the virile strain of s.mutans there's not much you can do save preventetive maintenance and fillings, but it's better to continue to breastfeed because not breastfeeding would be worse.









you can get the streptococcous whilr your pregnant. your ob/gyn is suppose to check you for it at anywhere from 36-38weeks






They test for Group B streptococcous- not Streptococcous mutans.  A different organism.

Kayla - posted on 12/03/2009

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Quoting Lisa:



Quoting Nicole:

I also know of a family denistry office (a big one in my city), that tells breastfeeding mothers that nursing at night can cause tooth decay! I told the hygenist "although I have no education or prior training in denistry or orthodontics, everything that I have been taught about breastfeeding is that it actually promotes better orthodontic health". She was not moved. I also told her that I breastfed for well beyond the time teeth erupted in my children's mouths (and most of that breastfeeding was done at night) and they have yet to have a cavaty or any sign of tooth decay!

All I could do was picture some poor mother who has brought her breastfed baby in for some form of check up and the dentist's office telling her that breastfeeding at night will cause her baby to have tooth decay, so what does she do??? She weans and puts her baby on a bottle and REALLY DOES cause her baby to have tooth decay.

Sometimes it's the medical professionals that give some of the worst advice!





At the beginning of November I attended the ME NH area LLL conference and one session was on dental caries. It was soooo informative.






I learned that dental caries are actually caused by a bacteria called streptococcous mutans, and people have varying amounts of this bacteria in their mouths.  We pick it up when our mothers kiss us, and when we share food.  Some people have a virulant strain of s. mutans, and they are very prone to tooth decay no matter how careful they are with diet and brushing.






They found that 71% of breastfed children are actually protected by the human milk, 30% were very protected, and only 10% actually got caries from nursing, and these children had the virile strain of s. mutans. However, this 10% would have been worse if they had been given formula instead of breastmilk.






-Breastmilk contains secretory IGA which is an immune component






-B12 Binding protein which binds s. mutans in saliva






-The fatty acids in breastmilk lyse bacteria






-Fibronectin causes macrophages to consume bacteria






-Lactoferrin interferes with the bacteria absorbing necessary iron






-Mucins bind to bacteria






I could write pages on what I learned!






Basically- if you've got the virile strain of s.mutans there's not much you can do save preventetive maintenance and fillings, but it's better to continue to breastfeed because not breastfeeding would be worse.





you can get the streptococcous whilr your pregnant. your ob/gyn is suppose to check you for it at anywhere from 36-38weeks

Kayla - posted on 12/03/2009

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Quoting Siri:

Several new moms around me, have stoped brest feeding; and claim that their milk didn't come in. I of corse don't believe it and just think they wanted to switch to formula because they think it's easier, for some reason.



it can be very true. quite a few mothers that i know, have what is called blue milk, which is soured milk. but i am having to get my supply built back up due to having my right ovary taken out.

Kayla - posted on 12/03/2009

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Quoting April:

many people do not know that nursing is actually a very good form of birth control but ONLY you are practicing ecological breastfeeding and your child is less than 6 months old. if you are giving your child solids, you need to start thinking about additional forms of BC. (i read this on kellymom) *thus, it is a myth that nursing is a terrible form of BC*



no matter if you're bf or not you are still very very very fertile. so birth control is still needed. my friend who was breastfeeding was told that by her dr and came up pregnant again just three weeks having her twins, now pregnant with twins again!

Elizabeth - posted on 12/03/2009

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Another myth I heard "you have to eat bland foods b/c thats what babies are "supposed" to start on."



I eat perfectly normal foods.... give me the garlic LOL... and my LOs had teeth.... they still nursed. My youngest will not touch bland cooked food. never has. I used jar food with the older two at 6 mos. But then realized i didnt have to with #3. She got her 1st solid a week before her 1st b-day (had to make sure she could handle it for her party LOL)

Nicole - posted on 12/03/2009

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Quoting April:



Quoting Nicole:

Myth: I am not making enough milk. (I say this is a myth, because, in most cases, it is.)





I wish it was a myth for me.  =(  Reglan, Fenugreek, Blessed Thistle, pumping after nursing to increase supply and demand and many nursing vacations later, I still have to supplement and it's breaking my heart right now.  =(





I'm so sorry.  Most women who believe they are not making enough milk never go through as much effort as you have taken to continue to breastfeed!  You obviously have worked hard to give the best to your baby and even some breastmilk in your case is awesome!  Way to go!



I put that as a myth because most women who stop breastfeeding due to inability to produce enough milk can or do make enough but due to misinformation (myths), they stop breastfeeding.



Continue your hard work and you will reap the benefits and so will your LO.

April - posted on 12/03/2009

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Quoting Ann:

My mother, who did not breast feed, told me I needed to wear a sweat shirt without a bra on to "toughen up" my nipples. I told her she had lost her mind. Then my mother-in-law, who did breastfeed three children, told me I needed to rub a wash cloth on my nipples to toughen them up. Because she is my mother in law I didn't tell her she had lost her mind, just smiled and said thanks. hahaha...That must have been what women were taught???


My mom was taught the same - but after my daughter was born and I had blisters and lacerations I really wish I had tried it!  lol!

April - posted on 12/03/2009

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Quoting Nicole:

Myth: I am not making enough milk. (I say this is a myth, because, in most cases, it is.)


I wish it was a myth for me.  =(  Reglan, Fenugreek, Blessed Thistle, pumping after nursing to increase supply and demand and many nursing vacations later, I still have to supplement and it's breaking my heart right now.  =(

Rachel - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting Becky:



Quoting Teresa:

My preferred method of bc is abstinence. Don't think that would go over to well for all you married ladies though. ;) LOL!





It's not the married ladies...it's the married husbands!!!  lol  ;-)





I don't know about that!  We had to wait 2 months after birth b/c I had a lot of stitches and took a while to heal.  Then my husband was diagnosed with testicular cancer.  It was almost a year w/o sex... and he wasn't the only one upset! lol.

Rachel - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting Becky:



Quoting Teresa:

My preferred method of bc is abstinence. Don't think that would go over to well for all you married ladies though. ;) LOL!





It's not the married ladies...it's the married husbands!!!  lol  ;-)





I don't know about that!  We had to wait 2 months after birth b/c I had a lot of stitches and took a while to heal.  Then my husband was diagnosed with testicular cancer.  It was almost a year w/o sex... and he wasn't the only one upset! lol.

[deleted account]

My mother, who did not breast feed, told me I needed to wear a sweat shirt without a bra on to "toughen up" my nipples. I told her she had lost her mind. Then my mother-in-law, who did breastfeed three children, told me I needed to rub a wash cloth on my nipples to toughen them up. Because she is my mother in law I didn't tell her she had lost her mind, just smiled and said thanks. hahaha...That must have been what women were taught???

Mandy - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting dani:



Quoting Mandy:

i was told yesterday that my 10mo (who has never had formula and never will) NEEDS a bottle to sleep through the night. and havihng him in my bed is a BIG mistake. i prompty moved away from that lady before my son got kicked off his cricket team for him mum punching a stupid lady :o)






Hmmm. Never say never, Mandy. I planned to breastfeed exclusively - and I managed right until two weeks before six months, when I then needed to introduce formula as well. It's not so terrible! Of course, breast is best, but if you set yourself - and your baby - up to ONLY get breastmilk, you might end up disappointed, when it's actually not THAT big a deal.






 






Re co-sleeping: there's actually been some VERY recent research in Australia about this, and it appears that it's not as safe as previously thought. I don't think they're necessarily saying don't do it, but you might need to consider other factors. Sorry - unsure of where the research was from but it was reported in the Sydney Morning Herald - you might look there to start if yuo're interested.






 






Best of luck and yes, try not to punch people, no matter how much they deserve it (at least not in front of the kids!)






re the artical in the newspaper, i have an artical from the telegraph station that it IS safe to sleep with your baby, even the SIDs people couldnt say otherwise.



 



and if it comes down to breastfeeding and being up a few times during the night, or formula feeding and sleeping, i would rather wake up. my first son was formula fed and has always been a sickly child. he is now 7yo and is at the dr at least once every 2 weeks and has had 4 operations, with the possaility of a 5th.



 



my 2nd son has never, and never will, have formula and he is 10mo and has his 2nd cold now.



i dont know if it is coincidence or not, but breastfeeding is really keeping him healthy.

Jen - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting Lisa:



Quoting Becky:




Quoting April:

many people do not know that nursing is actually a very good form of birth control but ONLY you are practicing ecological breastfeeding and your child is less than 6 months old. if you are giving your child solids, you need to start thinking about additional forms of BC. (i read this on kellymom) *thus, it is a myth that nursing is a terrible form of BC*







Actually my friend started her period when her son was 3 months old and she was exclusively breastfeeding and pumping milk to supplement 2 of her friends who were having production problems, so I'm not sure that it's the perfect form of BC.









Ecological breastfeeding is something a bit higher than simply exclusive breastfeeding. It's a very encompassing way of life, but generally is very effective birth control-wise.  Prior to 6 months it tends to be about 99% effective and after that about 94% effective (which is about the same effectiveness as that of a condom).



In order to practice ecological breastfeeding you must:

-Breastfeeding must be the infant’s only source of nutrition – no formula, no pumping, and (if the infant is less than six months old) no solids or water at all.

-The infant must be pacified at the breast, not with pacifiers or bottles or by placing a finger in the mouth.

-The infant must be breastfed frequently. The standards for LAM are a bare minimum; greater frequency is better. Sucking should include non-nutritive sucking when the infant cues the mother, not just breastfeeding as a means of nutrition. Scheduling of feedings is incompatible with LAM.

-Mothers must practice safe cosleeping as it is the proximity of the child to the mother that increases Prolactin

-Mothers must not be separated from their infants. This includes substitutes for mother such as babysitters and even strollers or anything else that comes between mother and physical contact with her child. Babywearing (using cloth carriers) means tactile stimulation between mother and child and increases access to the breast. Any separation from the mother will decrease the efficacy of ecological breast feeding.

-Mothers must take daily naps with their infants.

-A mother must not have had a period after 56 days post-partum (bleeding prior to 56 days post-partum can be ignored).



 





I didn't practice this to the letter with my son, but fed on demand and slept with him in the bed and didn't have a single period until I had to wean him at 7 months. *At the time I didn't know anything about lactagogues and only had a hand pump, so it was next to impossible for me to maintain bf with a full time job.



 



At this time, I have a 5 month old daughter who is bf and cosleeps half the night and eats solids twice daily. I dual-pump 1-3 times daily with an output of anywhere from 4 to 10oz per session, using fenugreek and blessed thistle to help out. I do take Micronor (birth control) as a precaution.



 



All that said, it took a full year of unprotected sex to conceive my daughter. My kids are two years apart.



 



Not diputing or trying to discredit the method, just want to show that bf is great birth control as far as I'm concerned.



 



:)

Brenda - posted on 12/02/2009

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On Ecological Breastfeeding:



Several studies have indicated that fertility and ovarian activity return step by step (Ellison 1996, p. 326-327):



1. Follicular activity without ovulation (No chance of pregnancy.)

1a. Menstruation without ovulation (This does not always occur--see below.)

2.Ovulation without luteal competence (After the egg is released, fertilization may take place. During the luteal phase, the uterine lining is prepared for implantation as the egg travels down the fallopian tube and into the uterus. If the uterine lining is not adequately prepared for implantation, the implantation will probably not be successful.)

3. Full luteal competence (Full fertility -- at this point breastfeeding no longer has any effect on your chance of pregnancy.)

It is possible to have one or (occasionally) more periods before you start ovulating. In this case, menstruation begins during the first stage of the return to fertility --before ovulation returns. Cycles without ovulation are most common during the first six months postpartum. For other mothers, the first menstruation is preceded by ovulation - a longer period of lactational amenorrhea increases the likelihood that you will ovulate before that first period.



A very small percentage of women will become pregnant during their first postpartum ovulation, without having had a postpartum period. Per fertility researcher Alan S. McNeilly, this "is rare and in our experience is related to a rapid reduction in suckling input."



Kellymom.com states the following:



Myth #1 – Breastfeeding cannot be relied upon to prevent pregnancy.



Myth #2 – Any amount of breastfeeding will prevent pregnancy, regardless of the frequency of breastfeeding or whether mom’s period has returned.



http://www.kellymom.com/bf/normal/fertil...



Also, this is what I was thinking of:



While it is possible for a nursing mom to become pregnant while she is breastfeeding and before she has her first menstrual period, it is rare. Most moms do not get pregnant until after their first period (often referred to as the "warning period"). Even after that, while some can become pregnant the first cycle, others will require months of cycles before pregnancy can occur. Still others (this is quite uncommon) may not be able to become pregnant until complete weaning has occurred.

April - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting Caro:



Quoting Becky:




Quoting April:

many people do not know that nursing is actually a very good form of birth control but ONLY you are practicing ecological breastfeeding and your child is less than 6 months old. if you are giving your child solids, you need to start thinking about additional forms of BC. (i read this on kellymom) *thus, it is a myth that nursing is a terrible form of BC*







Actually my friend started her period when her son was 3 months old and she was exclusively breastfeeding and pumping milk to supplement 2 of her friends who were having production problems, so I'm not sure that it's the perfect form of BC.









Unfortunately, I have to agree. My period came back at 6 or 7 wks post partum. It sucked. And my daughter was on exclusive breast milk. (Some nursing, some bottles, but all breast milk.) I made a comment about it on my facebook a little while ago and my aunt-in-law actually commented back with "I never had any trouble getting pregnant while breastfeeding." ... yeah ... that was a bit scary lol






 






I think the myth is that you simply can not get pregnant while breastfeeding OR that you definitely will get pregnant while breastfeeding because it encourages ovulation. I've heard both.






it is effective if you follow the strict rules of ecological breastfeeding. and i do mean STRICT. you can't even pump.

Jen - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting Lisa:



Quoting Becky:




Quoting April:

many people do not know that nursing is actually a very good form of birth control but ONLY you are practicing ecological breastfeeding and your child is less than 6 months old. if you are giving your child solids, you need to start thinking about additional forms of BC. (i read this on kellymom) *thus, it is a myth that nursing is a terrible form of BC*







Actually my friend started her period when her son was 3 months old and she was exclusively breastfeeding and pumping milk to supplement 2 of her friends who were having production problems, so I'm not sure that it's the perfect form of BC.









Ecological breastfeeding is something a bit higher than simply exclusive breastfeeding. It's a very encompassing way of life, but generally is very effective birth control-wise.  Prior to 6 months it tends to be about 99% effective and after that about 94% effective (which is about the same effectiveness as that of a condom).



In order to practice ecological breastfeeding you must:

-Breastfeeding must be the infant’s only source of nutrition – no formula, no pumping, and (if the infant is less than six months old) no solids or water at all.

-The infant must be pacified at the breast, not with pacifiers or bottles or by placing a finger in the mouth.

-The infant must be breastfed frequently. The standards for LAM are a bare minimum; greater frequency is better. Sucking should include non-nutritive sucking when the infant cues the mother, not just breastfeeding as a means of nutrition. Scheduling of feedings is incompatible with LAM.

-Mothers must practice safe cosleeping as it is the proximity of the child to the mother that increases Prolactin

-Mothers must not be separated from their infants. This includes substitutes for mother such as babysitters and even strollers or anything else that comes between mother and physical contact with her child. Babywearing (using cloth carriers) means tactile stimulation between mother and child and increases access to the breast. Any separation from the mother will decrease the efficacy of ecological breast feeding.

-Mothers must take daily naps with their infants.

-A mother must not have had a period after 56 days post-partum (bleeding prior to 56 days post-partum can be ignored).



 





I didn't practice this to the letter with my son, but fed on demand and slept with him in the bed and didn't have a single period until I had to wean him at 7 months. *At the time I didn't know anything about lactagogues and only had a hand pump, so it was next to impossible for me to maintain bf with a full time job.



 



At this time, I have a 5 month old daughter who is bf and cosleeps half the night and eats solids twice daily. I dual-pump 1-3 times daily with an output of anywhere from 4 to 10oz per session, using fenugreek and blessed thistle to help out. I do take Micronor (birth control) as a precaution.



 



All that said, it took a full year of unprotected sex to conceive my daughter. My kids are two years apart.



 



Not diputing or trying to discredit the method, just want to show that bf is great birth control as far as I'm concerned.



 



:)

Minnie - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting dani:



Quoting Lisa:

Hmmm...the tresillian link is to a family care service- that trumps the medical advice of the Australian Medical Association, the WHO, and UNICEF?

I do understand that what works for one does not work for all, but I do believe that when advice is given that contradicts sound current research that accurate information needs to be given.






My lord, Lisa, how rude you are. Not everyone who disagrees with you is an idiot or just making things up as they go, you know.






 






Tresillian is an arm of NSW Health, which is a state government department. Their work is actually based on very sound research. As I noted before, even scientists disagree with each other on lots of issues. That's how science progresses. Btw, I only recently stopped breastfeeding (my daughter is 15 months) and I'm a great supporter of it. But I'm here to support people and be supported, not trumpet my own views (even though mine, like yours, are supported by sound scientific research) as if they are gospel.





Not sure how my above comment was rude.  A disagreement makes me rude? I looked over that website, the research studies they provided and nothing shows me that the services and authority they provide is anything more than an average family or pediatric practitioner. My daughter's first doctor pushed solids at four months, told me to let her cry herself to sleep at seven months, and pushed weaning at one year. Sure, there has been 'research' that people have used to justify such practices, but current, well carried out research suggests breastfeeding on demand, breastfeeding past a year, and that CIO is dangerous to an infant.



Just because her doctor suggested those things, and the fact that someone somewhere did research to support their cause does not mean that it was sound information that my daughter's doctor provided me with. And that's what I see in the tresillian family care center's tips. Their tip sheets provide no research. However, the AMA, WHO, UNICEF, AAP, LLLI all provide extensive research and citations within their policy statements.



To me, the tresillian link is not a credible resource for parenting information. That's not me being rude.

Brenda - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting Jackie:

Breastfeeding as a form of birth control is as effective as a girl who has never had her period not using any birth control. We tell our daughters just because you have never had a period doesn't mean you can't get pregnant. It happens all the time because they don't know they ovulated and were about to get their first period in 2 weeks. No matter if your cycle is delayed or you never miss a period. Nursing doesn't actually stop you from ovulating and so many women get their period during nursing. Remember a period is a sign that you ovulated. My sister actually conceived my nephew because she believed the myth. And she hadn't started her cycle since giving birth either. They are only 1 1/2 years apart. She stopped nursing my niece when my nephew was born. She was more careful since then! ;)



It is possible to ovulate before your first period, however it is more likely that you have a period before you start to ovulate.  This is prepartion that most women's bodies go through before the actual time of fertility acutally begins.  This does not happen for everyone. But I'm sure you know people who have conceived on other forms of BC.  Just because it is not 100 percent does not make it an invalid form of BC.  There are many families that use natural family planning as BC, which some argue is not effective, but it is just as effective as some other forms, and perhaps safer in the long run.

Brenda - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting Caro:



Quoting Becky:




Quoting April:

many people do not know that nursing is actually a very good form of birth control but ONLY you are practicing ecological breastfeeding and your child is less than 6 months old. if you are giving your child solids, you need to start thinking about additional forms of BC. (i read this on kellymom) *thus, it is a myth that nursing is a terrible form of BC*







Actually my friend started her period when her son was 3 months old and she was exclusively breastfeeding and pumping milk to supplement 2 of her friends who were having production problems, so I'm not sure that it's the perfect form of BC.









Unfortunately, I have to agree. My period came back at 6 or 7 wks post partum. It sucked. And my daughter was on exclusive breast milk. (Some nursing, some bottles, but all breast milk.) I made a comment about it on my facebook a little while ago and my aunt-in-law actually commented back with "I never had any trouble getting pregnant while breastfeeding." ... yeah ... that was a bit scary lol






 






I think the myth is that you simply can not get pregnant while breastfeeding OR that you definitely will get pregnant while breastfeeding because it encourages ovulation. I've heard both.






Breastfeeding in the LAM way is effective, as effective as the BC pill.  Does this mean you can't get pregnant?  Of course not.  I have a friend who conceived his frist child when using a condom, his second child when she was on the pill, and his third child when she was on the Depo shot.  I have another friend who was conceived after his mother had a tubal ligation and his father had a vascectamy (sp).  Condoms are only 85 percent effective, when used properly, and the pill is 98 percent effective, when used properly (which most women do not use it properly).  Other forms such as implants, the ring, the patch, they are have a chance of failure.  Nothing is for sure except abstinance.



I myself have been using LAM in combination with condoms because I have a huge fear of getting pregnant again before my husband's vasectamy.  But even then, there is a chance we could get pregnant.  Everyone needs to keep in mind that the rules of LAM birth control are very strict to be effective.  You can't be a working mother, you can't leave your child for long periods of time, you must maintain skin on skin contact as much as possible....



There's a book out about natural child spacing but I can't think of the author or the name, its like breastfeeding and natural child spacing.  In places that utilize no formula and their only form of BC is breastfeeding, there are some distinct patterns to child spacing.  If I come across the name and author I'll link it.  The fact is, for a mother in our Western civilization to use LAM is very rare.  Our lives are usually not suited to this method.

Brenda - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting Teri:

Someone told me that breastfeeding would cause you to have saggy breasts, which is not true!!



Got news for them, its the being pregnant part that makes you have saggy breasts, not the nursing part...LOL

Brenda - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting dani:



Quoting Lisa:

Hmmm...the tresillian link is to a family care service- that trumps the medical advice of the Australian Medical Association, the WHO, and UNICEF?

I do understand that what works for one does not work for all, but I do believe that when advice is given that contradicts sound current research that accurate information needs to be given.






My lord, Lisa, how rude you are. Not everyone who disagrees with you is an idiot or just making things up as they go, you know.






 






Tresillian is an arm of NSW Health, which is a state government department. Their work is actually based on very sound research. As I noted before, even scientists disagree with each other on lots of issues. That's how science progresses. Btw, I only recently stopped breastfeeding (my daughter is 15 months) and I'm a great supporter of it. But I'm here to support people and be supported, not trumpet my own views (even though mine, like yours, are supported by sound scientific research) as if they are gospel.





I think calling people rude is a little out of line.  All Lisa is saying is that the major agencies that have the most research and information behind them are probably the most likely to be the best place for advice.  I will never advocate scheduled feeds of any kind, simply because of the possible damage to infants because of it.  Does every infant have problems from it? No, of course not.  Some infants can handle it, but the vast majority of infants cannot.  If I tried to schedule feed my seven month old my milk would probably dry up and my son would end up on formula because he would be hungry all the time. 



I would ask when their research was done and with whom, first off.  I know how these studies are done.  You can literally make them say what you want.  UNICEF and WHO have many many studies behind them.  And looking at their research they are accounting for variables that some studies do not account for.  Anyone who states their research says and does not tell you who they did research with, how many and for how long is not reputable.  I have not reserached these people, so I do not know for sure.  All I know is that research can be twisted to agree with whatever the researcher wants it to say.  One can call in so many people who he knows are going to plump up his favored statistics and ignore those that do not meet his/her hypothesis.  I've seen this happen.  There are also sometimes third and forth variables causing a certain effect that are not listed in research.



All we are saying here is that you cannot use a blanket statement that scheduled feeds are good for babies.  The fact is, from the amoung of infants that are sent to the ER every year with dehydration due to parents attempting scheduled feeds when the baby cannot handle it, that is not true.  It is not in the best interest of all mothers to recommend the practice because of this one simple statistic.  It is not safe for all babies, even over six months of age.  For a health organization to recommend it, or any doctor, is irresponsible in the light of a lot of recent research.  Does this mean no baby can be put on scheduled feeds?  Of course not.  Some babies can handle it.  All that anyone here is saying is that you cannot give the advice that they work for all babies.



Health organizations have also done things such as recommend cry it out (which abhor more than about anything else) which new research shows may lead to ADHD in adolescence, they have recommended putting babies on cereal at two to four weeks of age, they have suggested putting cereal in infant bottles, they have recommended putting Karo syrup or other sweeteners in baby bottles, they have told parents that if their child coughs they need antibiotics, they have recommended dozens of medications that have been pulled off the shelves, they used to put mothers to sleep with Twilight meds during birth which was harmful to babies, they used to say put babies to sleep on their bellies, and I could go on and on.  Just because one particular medical organization or doctor says something is right does not make it so.



After all that I suppose the question is then why do I agree with WHO and UNICEF?  Simply because their recommendations match the way mothers have parented for thousands of years.  They match the natural mother's instinct.  They are the same as what other mammals do when taking care of their young.  But, as with anything else, this is my own belief.  I disagree with anything that goes against the natural instincts of the mother, thus feeding on demand is the way I feel all infants should be fed, including bottle fed infants.  It jus so happens there is tons of research to back it up right now and that research base is growing rapidly as doctors realize that perhaps the way they thought things should be done wasn't correct.

Caro - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting Jenny:

The myth that I hear a lot (even from breastfeeding advocates) is that a bottle of expressed breast milk is the same as feeding at the breast. The hormone responses through skin to skin contact are one of the major benefits for breastfeeding moms and is what helps develop it into such an enjoyable experience. Also, many of the immune proteins, minerals, fats, etc. in breast milk also can be bound and inhibited by any foreign substance (i,e, plastic, glass, etc. in pumps, bottles and false nipples).

Another myth that I heard a lot from other breastfeeding moms was that you need to pump to stimulate your milk production. Feeding baby on the breast and resting with baby stimulates milk production the best.

And another one along that same line was that you need to feed on both sides at every feeding (not if you are block nursing to curtail the overactive let down and overproduction created by aforementioned pumping)

Good luck to anyone and everyone that is choosing to breastfeed in whatever manner and amount they can. It is not an easy road at times but so worth it!


With the first one, I have heard that giving a baby milk that has been recently pumped is just as good, minus the skin to skin contact part. But you can always bottle feed doing skin to skin contact. I did.



 



And with the last one, I think it really depends. I know some moms who definitely didn't need to do that, but I had to. I fed my daughter on demand and in the beginning, I had to feed her on both sides or I my breasts would get hard. In between every feeding, I filled an entire nursing pad. I even got these cups that stay on your breast and collect the milk that drips out so you can just dump it (and then reuse the cups) and those would actually overflow. So I think some moms really do have to feed on both sides at every feeding. Of course, my daughter didn't want to switch so I ended up nursing on one side and pumping the other and then switched at the next feeding.

Caro - posted on 12/02/2009

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Quoting Becky:



Quoting April:

many people do not know that nursing is actually a very good form of birth control but ONLY you are practicing ecological breastfeeding and your child is less than 6 months old. if you are giving your child solids, you need to start thinking about additional forms of BC. (i read this on kellymom) *thus, it is a myth that nursing is a terrible form of BC*





Actually my friend started her period when her son was 3 months old and she was exclusively breastfeeding and pumping milk to supplement 2 of her friends who were having production problems, so I'm not sure that it's the perfect form of BC.





Unfortunately, I have to agree. My period came back at 6 or 7 wks post partum. It sucked. And my daughter was on exclusive breast milk. (Some nursing, some bottles, but all breast milk.) I made a comment about it on my facebook a little while ago and my aunt-in-law actually commented back with "I never had any trouble getting pregnant while breastfeeding." ... yeah ... that was a bit scary lol



 



I think the myth is that you simply can not get pregnant while breastfeeding OR that you definitely will get pregnant while breastfeeding because it encourages ovulation. I've heard both.

Jenny - posted on 12/01/2009

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Quoting Rachel:

This isn't a myth but it still makes me laugh:

I was on WIC with my oldest and they got me a double electric pump when I went back to work. A month or so after I went back to work, I had an appointment with the nutritionist. She wanted to know how many formula coupons I needed for my son. I pointed out that I had a pump. She said it said that in my file but how many formula coupons did I need? I said NONE, I have a pump. She looked at me blankly and I said I pump during work for my son. We have never used formula. Her response? "You can feed that to a baby? Really?" OMG. We spent the rest of the appointment having a lesson on pumping, handling and storage of milk, and how to feed it to a breastfed baby. Sheesh. She thought you pumped the milk into a sink to prevent engorgement and just flushed it down the drain and the baby ate formula while mum was gone. Seriously. *shakes head*


WOW!!!!!!!

Jenny - posted on 12/01/2009

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The myth that I hear a lot (even from breastfeeding advocates) is that a bottle of expressed breast milk is the same as feeding at the breast. The hormone responses through skin to skin contact are one of the major benefits for breastfeeding moms and is what helps develop it into such an enjoyable experience. Also, many of the immune proteins, minerals, fats, etc. in breast milk also can be bound and inhibited by any foreign substance (i,e, plastic, glass, etc. in pumps, bottles and false nipples).

Another myth that I heard a lot from other breastfeeding moms was that you need to pump to stimulate your milk production. Feeding baby on the breast and resting with baby stimulates milk production the best.

And another one along that same line was that you need to feed on both sides at every feeding (not if you are block nursing to curtail the overactive let down and overproduction created by aforementioned pumping)

Good luck to anyone and everyone that is choosing to breastfeed in whatever manner and amount they can. It is not an easy road at times but so worth it!

Francesca - posted on 12/01/2009

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Quoting Siri:

Several new moms around me, have stoped brest feeding; and claim that their milk didn't come in. I of corse don't believe it and just think they wanted to switch to formula because they think it's easier, for some reason.



Hey Siri,



I found a lot of my friends and family stopped with the same reason.  I know they tried very hard and in some cases it was ligitimate and in others, well, I think they heard enough *myths*-old ladies telling them that if their baby needs to feed that often then their milk isnt coming in, or they didn't have enough.  And fearing their baby is starving, they went to formula. 



I heard it all the time.  I just ignored them.  Luckily I have a doctor who is very pro BF.  In fact, he suggested exclusive BF until the baby is 8 months and delaying foods until then, and helped me see past the hogwash. 



I really think that this *myth* is the biggest problem new moms face.  It really bothers me.  I feel it sabotages many new moms attempts.  I mean the fear that I was starving my baby pushed me to formula for an entire day.  But since that day, we have exclusively breastfed ever since. 



I truely believe that breastfeeding is the best possible option for babies. But I also believe that every women should have the right to do what they think is best for their family. Even if they choose formula. And I think sometimes us breastfeeding moms have a little bit of a "holier than thou" complex.



Us moms need to stick together.

Rachel - posted on 12/01/2009

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This isn't a myth but it still makes me laugh:

I was on WIC with my oldest and they got me a double electric pump when I went back to work. A month or so after I went back to work, I had an appointment with the nutritionist. She wanted to know how many formula coupons I needed for my son. I pointed out that I had a pump. She said it said that in my file but how many formula coupons did I need? I said NONE, I have a pump. She looked at me blankly and I said I pump during work for my son. We have never used formula. Her response? "You can feed that to a baby? Really?" OMG. We spent the rest of the appointment having a lesson on pumping, handling and storage of milk, and how to feed it to a breastfed baby. Sheesh. She thought you pumped the milk into a sink to prevent engorgement and just flushed it down the drain and the baby ate formula while mum was gone. Seriously. *shakes head*

Jenny - posted on 12/01/2009

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Quoting Nicole:

I do have another story that a facebook friend of mine posted to another pregnant woman (who, by the way, is pregnant with twins and SO wants to breastfeed). She said "if it was intended for us to breastfeed that God wouldn't have made breasts so appealling to men". Now, I know her and I know she was joking, but I was offended by the comment nonetheless. I wanted to say "yes they do, but they also find vaginas very appealling. Are we supposed to stop birthing children altogether or everyone get c-sections, because dare we use something else that men like for child rearing purposes?!?"

Again, I know she was joking, but what offended me, was that I know people actually think this way! Ugghhhhh!


  My theory is that most men that have breast fetishes were not breastfed at all or long enough.

Christine - posted on 12/01/2009

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I think it's ironic that so many mums are discussing (online and IRL in my BF'ing groups) birth control and whether or not BF'ing is a plus or minus when trying to conceive again. We did IVF after 2 years of TTC on our own (ages 33 and 40 at that point), so I'm on the opposite page- we'd like to conceive again quickly rather than delay it at all. I'm BF'ing as long as I can, but we'll stimulate a cycle for me to ovulate and prepare the endometrial lining for implantation. You can jump-start your fertility cycles with the proper combination of horomones of course :-).

Dani - posted on 12/01/2009

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Quoting Lisa:

Hmmm...the tresillian link is to a family care service- that trumps the medical advice of the Australian Medical Association, the WHO, and UNICEF?

I do understand that what works for one does not work for all, but I do believe that when advice is given that contradicts sound current research that accurate information needs to be given.



My lord, Lisa, how rude you are. Not everyone who disagrees with you is an idiot or just making things up as they go, you know.



 



Tresillian is an arm of NSW Health, which is a state government department. Their work is actually based on very sound research. As I noted before, even scientists disagree with each other on lots of issues. That's how science progresses. Btw, I only recently stopped breastfeeding (my daughter is 15 months) and I'm a great supporter of it. But I'm here to support people and be supported, not trumpet my own views (even though mine, like yours, are supported by sound scientific research) as if they are gospel.

Nicole - posted on 12/01/2009

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I have not laughed so hard about anything in such a long time!!! A BOMB!!! LOL literally!

Minnie - posted on 12/01/2009

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I like the bomb myth...maybe if that happened and I nursed my daughter she would develop super powers or something...

Elizabeth - posted on 12/01/2009

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Quoting Lisa:



Quoting Becky:




Quoting April:

many people do not know that nursing is actually a very good form of birth control but ONLY you are practicing ecological breastfeeding and your child is less than 6 months old. if you are giving your child solids, you need to start thinking about additional forms of BC. (i read this on kellymom) *thus, it is a myth that nursing is a terrible form of BC*







Actually my friend started her period when her son was 3 months old and she was exclusively breastfeeding and pumping milk to supplement 2 of her friends who were having production problems, so I'm not sure that it's the perfect form of BC.









Ecological breastfeeding is something a bit higher than simply exclusive breastfeeding. It's a very encompassing way of life, but generally is very effective birth control-wise.  Prior to 6 months it tends to be about 99% effective and after that about 94% effective (which is about the same effectiveness as that of a condom).



In order to practice ecological breastfeeding you must:

-Breastfeeding must be the infant’s only source of nutrition – no formula, no pumping, and (if the infant is less than six months old) no solids or water at all.

-The infant must be pacified at the breast, not with pacifiers or bottles or by placing a finger in the mouth.

-The infant must be breastfed frequently. The standards for LAM are a bare minimum; greater frequency is better. Sucking should include non-nutritive sucking when the infant cues the mother, not just breastfeeding as a means of nutrition. Scheduling of feedings is incompatible with LAM.

-Mothers must practice safe cosleeping as it is the proximity of the child to the mother that increases Prolactin

-Mothers must not be separated from their infants. This includes substitutes for mother such as babysitters and even strollers or anything else that comes between mother and physical contact with her child. Babywearing (using cloth carriers) means tactile stimulation between mother and child and increases access to the breast. Any separation from the mother will decrease the efficacy of ecological breast feeding.

-Mothers must take daily naps with their infants.

-A mother must not have had a period after 56 days post-partum (bleeding prior to 56 days post-partum can be ignored).





SO thats whats did it!?  I BF my oldest exclusively for 10 mos but didn't do anything else on the list.  i had to go on BC when he was 4 mos b/c my periods started back up.  it didnt help I still got preg with number 2 (when son was 10 mos).  



Daughter #2 is now 2 1/2 I wore her, nursed her (still do), i was her paci (still am).  Didnt get Aunt Flo till she was 13 mos.  She still nurses, but not enough to be effective anymore. Wow.



 



Worst myth I ever heard:  Babies not on formula after 6 weeks become malnourished.  ( my son's 1st Dr. told me this.) I changed Drs.



One that my gramma had been told when she had her kids.  That formula was safest b/c if a bomb went off her milk would no longer be safe.  (my mom and her older brother were born in the 50s)

Minnie - posted on 12/01/2009

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Hmmm...the tresillian link is to a family care service- that trumps the medical advice of the Australian Medical Association, the WHO, and UNICEF?



I do understand that what works for one does not work for all, but I do believe that when advice is given that contradicts sound current research that accurate information needs to be given.

Dani - posted on 12/01/2009

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For info on the NSW Health area which recommends scheduled feeding, go to www.tresillian.net and click on 'resources'. You'll see that under feeding routines for 4-10 month, there are recommended schedules for feeding. Pls be aware that Tresillian (part of NSW Health) are VERY good about making sure that they tell all their clients that all babies and families are different and that what works for one baby/family won't work for all. Tresillian isn't for everyone but they certainly helped me and my family a LOT.

Can I also pls add that, despite the fact that this group exists to support other breastfeeding mums, sometimes these posts can feel almost like bullying? I'd like to propose the following, which I believe to be factual:

1. Some things are good for babies. Some things are bad for babies. Some things won't make much of a difference either way.

2. What is good and what is bad (and what is neutral) is often a matter for debate even amongst research scientists (who are the only ones who are not relying on anecdotal evidence)

3. Medical advice is subject to fashion (as those of us who were bottle-fed in the '60s on doctor's advice know!)

4. Everyone wants to do the right thing by their baby (well, nearly everyone - let's assume that at least everyone in this group!)

5. Sometimes a parent needs to choose an option which is less than ideal for their baby (eg bottle feeding) because of their own mental or physical health. Ultimately, a less than ideal option MAY actually work out better for the baby if it means that mum is more/better able to look after baby in other ways.

6. Everyone in this group is here because we both want support for ourselves, and want to support others.

7. All babies and mums are different! Some needs/preferences will be shared by everyone, but some won't.

Are these reasonable?

Minnie - posted on 12/01/2009

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Quoting Jackie:

Breastfeeding as a form of birth control is as effective as a girl who has never had her period not using any birth control. We tell our daughters just because you have never had a period doesn't mean you can't get pregnant. It happens all the time because they don't know they ovulated and were about to get their first period in 2 weeks. No matter if your cycle is delayed or you never miss a period. Nursing doesn't actually stop you from ovulating and so many women get their period during nursing. Remember a period is a sign that you ovulated. My sister actually conceived my nephew because she believed the myth. And she hadn't started her cycle since giving birth either. They are only 1 1/2 years apart. She stopped nursing my niece when my nephew was born. She was more careful since then! ;)



If a mother practices ecological breastfeeding it is highly probable that she does not ovulate.  I practice NFP when not pregnant or breastfeeding, and thus am quite tuned into my body's cycles.  I can tell you, I am not ovulating right now while breastfeeding.



 

April - posted on 12/01/2009

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my sister in law won't nurse because she said it will make her boobs "ugly"

Teri - posted on 12/01/2009

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Someone told me that breastfeeding would cause you to have saggy breasts, which is not true!!

Sylvia - posted on 12/01/2009

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This isn't exactly a myth, but it's a misperception: many people, especially women who have nursed for a very short time, seem to think that nursing a toddler or a three- or four-year-old is just like nursing a newborn, only bigger. Of course, it's not like that at all -- toddlers and older kids (usually) eat regular-people food, drink regular-people drinks, and have lots of other interests besides nursing. (Also, they can stand next to you and nurse for 30 seconds while you're typing ;^).)

Another myth: if your older baby is only nursing for a few minutes each time, it means you're not making enough milk, or that the baby isn't interested in nursing anymore, or that the baby isn't getting as much milk. (In fact, it probably just means that the baby has gotten more efficient at extracting the milk.)

Jackie - posted on 12/01/2009

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Breastfeeding as a form of birth control is as effective as a girl who has never had her period not using any birth control. We tell our daughters just because you have never had a period doesn't mean you can't get pregnant. It happens all the time because they don't know they ovulated and were about to get their first period in 2 weeks. No matter if your cycle is delayed or you never miss a period. Nursing doesn't actually stop you from ovulating and so many women get their period during nursing. Remember a period is a sign that you ovulated. My sister actually conceived my nephew because she believed the myth. And she hadn't started her cycle since giving birth either. They are only 1 1/2 years apart. She stopped nursing my niece when my nephew was born. She was more careful since then! ;)

Jaime - posted on 12/01/2009

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Yes it depends on the woman for sure!!! I never skipped my period but 5 months (during my pregnancy) i realize that the bleeding i experienced while pregnant was not a period, but i still had it pretty much on time every month. and 2 weeks after my pp bleeding stopped, I was visited my aunt flo. And that is with BOTH of my pregnancies!

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