breastfeeding and formula feeding together?

Seirra - posted on 11/17/2011 ( 44 moms have responded )

32

14

0

is it ok to breastfeed my 2 week old and then give her formula when out on the go???

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Cheryl Dawn - posted on 11/19/2011

16

0

0

She is only two weeks old so you would give her about 2 ounces of breastmilk, the same as you would formula. She might take 3 now and then but I would keep her at 2 to 2-1/2 for the next week. Then keep it between 2 and 3. There is really no reason to give her formula at this time. Just pump your own milk. You should also find a place to pump if you won't nurse while you are out, if it is going to be more than 2 to 3 hours, your breasts must keep the milk moving in order to keep producing. Freshly pumped breastmilk keeps up to 8 days in the fridge, 6 to 10 hours at room temperature of up to 72degrees. Many sources are telling you lower times now but that is because they don't know the heat or conditions that you are keeping your milk. In a cooler for 24 hours. I'll bet you could get so much pumped that you can save it in the freezer, too, that keeps for at least 6 months. Also give your two year old 4-8 ounces a day since the cold and flu season is coming upon us. A deep freezer will keep your milk for 6-12 months or longer. Once thawed if it was in the refrigerator just for that day, not out running around town with you, then you can just throw it back in the freezer. You can refreeze it, I have the study I will have to get it and post it for you. Freshly pumped breastmilk keeps much longer than formula because of the live antibodies that attack any germs that might get introduced.

[deleted account]

I would hold off on the formula right now. Your body is trying to learn how much to make. If you skip feedings you can cause supply issues. Skipping feedings can also lead to plugged ducts or mastitis. Your body regulates around 3 months and by then you may feel more comfortable nursing in public. It takes a while to get the hang of it the first time around.

Cheryl Dawn - posted on 11/19/2011

16

0

0

PEffect of Environmental conditions on Unpasteurized Donor Human Milk
David J. Rechtman, Martin L. Lee and H. Berg. Breastfeeding Medicine. Spring 2006, 1(1): 24-26. doi:10.1089/bfm.2006.1.24.




The milk studied was donor milk expressed by mothers who took no special sanitary precautions. The milk was first stored at -20°C (-4°F) for two months and then at -80°C (-110°F) until its use in the experiment. Then the milk was thawed overnight to 4°C (39° F), separated into different sample batches, and refrozen to -80°C (-110°F).

The second phase of the experiment began by thawing these sample batches of milk to a room temperature of 23°C (73°F). Then each batch was exposed to one of the following conditions:

* 8°C (46°F) for 8 hours
* 8°C (46°F) for 24 hours
* 23°C(73°F) for 4 hours
* 23°C (73°F) for 8 hours
* Multiple freeze-thaw cycles of varying lengths
* A steady -20°C (-4°F), considered the control

The Results

None of the milk developed unacceptable bacterial counts, the main concern about refreezing milk. In fact, they did not even come close.

There were some changes in vitamin content. Vitamin A levels stayed stable, but vitamin C levels decreased to about one-half when kept at room temperature for 8 hours and by one-fourth when refrigerated for 24 hours. However, the authors note that the reduced vitamin levels are considered adequate for full-term babies and older infants by the National Academy of Medicine.

Differences in fatty acids levels in the milk were considered clinically insignificant and unrelated to repeated freezing and thawing.

The authors write:

“Based on these data, it appears that unpasteurized milk that has been thawed in the refrigerator for up to 8 hours may be safely refrozen….

This should allow for… the salvage of milk that mothers might otherwise have been told to discard.”

This study further confirms the robustness of human milk. If its results are replicated, it will also give clinicians another tool to help mothers meet their breastfeeding goals. Then, if due to a a power outage or something else, a mother finds herself with a larger amount of thawed milk than her baby can take in 24 hours, she will have the option of refreezing her thawed milk rather than discarding it.

For mothers who express their milk, this information may help them use more and discard less, resulting in better health outcomes for their babies.

D.J. Rechtman, M.L. Lee and H. Berg, Effect of environmental conditions on unpasteurized donor human milk. Breastfeed Med 2006: 1(1):24-26.
Effect of Environmental conditions on Unpasteurized Donor Human Milk
http://www.liebertonline.com/doi/pdf.../... ost a reply!

Candace - posted on 12/01/2011

119

17

9

I think that having good nursing shirts and bras are essential to public nursing. My favorite item are the nursing tank tops I have from target. They were inexpensive and I find that I don't have to wear a bra with them because the built in bra is quite good. I will wear a cardigan sweater or zipper front shirt. I cover up with a swaddling blanket and we're good. I was quite shy about breastfeeding in public with my first son. I would only do it in the bathroom or the car. This second time, I am less worried about it. I will still use a private place if available but I have nursed in booths at restaurants,etc. Honestly, inthink people often think the baby is just asleep. It is definitely easier than hauling around bottles and sterilized water and formula... Good luck!

Amanda - posted on 12/19/2011

11

18

1

I did, it was just hard to pump and feed on the go. Neither of my babies would feed right off the breast. My daughter had nipple confusion and my son wouldn't stay awake. I tried to pump before and take it with me in a cooler. But if you get too tired and wore out use formula. I got the stomach flu while pumping and it drained me. I guess it all depends on how you feel and how easy it is for you to feed.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

44 Comments

View replies by

Mia - posted on 12/22/2011

161

9

9

Seirra, can you hold off on the formula for a bit. Could you use expressed breast milk instead? Your supply hasn't established itself yet & introducing formula can muck around with your supply & bub might choose to go the easier option of bottle rather than boob then you've got a whole other issue on your hands. I used one of those peanut slings, a bubba moe & could feed bub in that while walking around etc & no one could tell!

Bobbie Jo - posted on 12/20/2011

6

0

1

frozen in a refrigerator is good 3-6 mo, in a deep freeze for a year... discard any left over thawed milk after 48 hrs. freshly pumped is good at room temp for 8 hrs. congrats on nursing. I am a nursing/pumping at work mother for almost 5 mo. and these r the times they gave me with my Ameda pump.

Seirra - posted on 12/18/2011

32

14

0

they are mostly on my sides where my arms are. what would be the best position be?? and i only whear training bras cuz they are easier

Amanda - posted on 12/18/2011

53

22

0

Is your bra causing the problem? I used to get some soreness in my ducts when I wore a particular bra. Once I quit using it everything was fine. If you have a clogged duct have your baby nurse with her chin towards the blocked area, then she will most effectively drain that duct and clear things up. It can seem kind of strange if the clog is at the top of your breast to have to lay down and have the baby hanging over your shoulder but it works!

[deleted account]

I struggled with clogged ducts with my first due to oversupply. Do you use a nipple shield? I only ask because as soon as we ditched the shield the clogs went away. Make sure you change up your nursing positions so that all the ducts are thoroughly emptied (do football hold one session then cradle hold the next). Like Claire said do heat and massage before and during nursing. I controlled my oversupply much better this time around by nursing on one breast each feeding. If you think that you have too much milk then work with a La Leche League Leader (http://www.llli.org) or lactation consultant for ideas on how to help with oversupply.

Claire - posted on 12/14/2011

40

28

0

Have you tried unclogging the ducts with heat/massage whilst expressing? The shower us good as you have the heat of the water, tnhe slipperiness of the soap and you can hand express and bit worry about the mess. Otherwise apply a heat pack to the lump prior to and during a breastfeed, again massaging from the outside of the breast towards the nipple, over the lump. It can be painful, but if you persist every feed for a day or two you should be able to unblock the duct before mastitis occurs. I had persistent blocked ducts which wouldnt budge, and I ended up getting rid of them by having acupuncture, worked every time! Keep at it, and most importantly keep feeding from the breast with the lump. If you find the lumps keep reoccurring in the same position, try changing your feeding position to effectively drain that aspect if your breast. Hope this helps

Seirra - posted on 12/14/2011

32

14

0

no when i said painfull i ment i keep getting clogged ducts and i currently have a mild case of mestitis

Claire - posted on 12/14/2011

40

28

0

Smart baby! Make sure your baby is always attached correctly, that should ease any discomfort, if pain continues dispute correct attachment, there is a problem and worth seeing your doctor/midwife/lactation specialist, breastfeeding shouldn't hurt, you shouldn't feel any discomfort. Goodluck!

Seirra - posted on 12/14/2011

32

14

0

k yes my post is a month old now...and the update is...im stuck with breastfeeding!! :) she wont take a bottle, and she doesnt like formula so im gonna breastfeed for a long time.. and it gets quite painful at times

Heidi - posted on 12/14/2011

7

0

0

I see your post is a month old now, but about where you are at now is when I started giving my breastfed son 2 bottles of formula per day. I too feel a little uncormfortable nursing outside of my home. It gives me a break and an opportunity to leave him over a feeding time. He is not at all confused and still nurses well. I will warn it took some practice for him to take a bottle from me, because he associated me with nursing. So try giving him the bottle at home before you head out!

Tiajuana - posted on 11/30/2011

23

1

0

That is what I do when I have to go out and didnt have time to pump.She is still 95% aday BF

Lori - posted on 11/28/2011

98

3

0

From a personal experience, I would try not to do this. I did this with my oldest son, and had a very difficult time with nursing. I thought what would the big deal be? Well, I lost a lot of milk! Finally at 6 months, I gave up because my son was so frustrated with my production. When I did stop nursing him, I had no engorgement whatsoever. Which means my body was barely producing any milk! What I did with my 2nd son was start to pump. I pumped once in the night, and once in the day, and before too long, I had my own little stash to feed him on occasions as such. It made life so much more manageable. Also I got sick and lost a lot of milk, but having a frozen supply ready to go allowed my son to have more than enough until I got it back. Good luck, and I wish you the best, with your new little bundle!

Claire - posted on 11/28/2011

40

28

0

Good on you Seirra for making the decision to breastfeed whilst your out. It will not only make your life so much easier, but as some other women have mentioned before, your breast milk is by far the best food for your baby - why introduce formula? I have breastfed both my boys, at home, out in public, cafes, restaurants, shopping malls, playgrounds, if your babys hungry - feed him when ever, where ever, and don't ever feel bad or embarrased for doing so - there will always be a few narrow minded people around who feel 'offended' by a woman breastfeeding in public - but it is their issue, not yours, and these people are in the minority! (thank god)

[deleted account]

The most public I ever nursed my twins was in the car.. or an empty room at a friend's house.

I became a single mom when they were 6 and their brother was a newborn. The girls lives wouldn't stop just cuz they had a brother and I wasn't comfortable w/ using formula OR w/ pumping. At first I was uncomfortable nursing in public, but it got easier and I got over it. We nursed in public for about 2 years!

It's not for everyone, but if you CAN get used to it.... it makes life SO much easier. :)

Celeste - posted on 11/21/2011

3,000

30

853

Exactly!! Drives me nuts when people accuse bf'ers as "whipping out tits". Dude, that takes a lot of talent to "whip" them out and I would imagine quite painful

Seirra - posted on 11/21/2011

32

14

0

if u really think about it women have been doin it for millions of yrs as long as humans were on this planet so it should not be a problem we r only feeding out babys not being permiscuis sluts and flashing the world our tits who ever dont like well too bad dont look

Celeste - posted on 11/21/2011

3,000

30

853

Sounds like a plan!! I know for me, it took a few times but eventually I got more confident.

Seirra - posted on 11/21/2011

32

14

0

thnx uve all been really helpful im actually thinking of nursing in public ive been doin it so far and no problems lol ive evin done it inn a cab cuz she wouldnt wait!!l Lol!! i think im gonna pump in the morning if i kno i have to go out that day and bring it with me just in case im in a situation where i cant nurse but if not i wont use it imma take it just for emergency.

Joyce - posted on 11/21/2011

1

0

0

Any breast milk is better than none. You need to do what you feel comfortable with. Pumping is not for everyone. Congratulations on nursing!

Amy - posted on 11/19/2011

37

30

0

Breast milk coats the gut with antibodies which is where illnessgets contracted. When you feed formula, those anitbodies are washed away. Bad idea to feed baby formula outside because the antibodies will get removed. Some babies who are breast fed cannot tolerate formula. My DD could not and she would get terribly bloated, her tiny belly would blow up and she would struggle with the gas for hours and hours and scream non-stop. I would have to lay her tummy down over my leg and pat her back for 2 hours to help her get relief. NO FUN!!!!! You feel so sad when you can't give them immediate relief. It wasn't from anything else cos we would stop the formula and she'd be okay. Give her one formula feeding and she was sick again! I know many moms wont nurse in the bathroom but that should only be if you's have to be in a stall. Lots of places now have large family bathrooms and nursing areas. If you are near a Toys R Us, go in there. They usually have a nursing room with changing tables and free diapers! Walmarts usually have a family bathroom. The one by me was in the back of the store and they had the job application kiosk back there too and I'd borrow the chair to sit on in the large bathroom 10 feet from the toilet and nurse. Someone cmes a knockin', OH WELL! They can go to the regular bathroom or they can wait.

Mercy - posted on 11/19/2011

20

9

2

Yes, I did that with mine since it was hard to always find a private place for breastfeeding.

Celeste - posted on 11/19/2011

3,000

30

853

Yeah, forgot about that too. Having done both bottle feeding in public and nursing in public, I'm just not sure how bottle feeding is easier than nursing, logistically. For me, it was nice having that extra hand to tend to the other 2 (I nursed twins and have an older daughter).

[deleted account]

Cheryl makes an excellent point that I forgot to mention. If you give pumped milk while you're out you will still need to pump in order to keep supply up. Another reason why it may be easier to just nurse.

Amber - posted on 11/19/2011

9

8

1

I had to start supplementing when my son was two weeks old. It hasn't caused any problems at all. I recommend the NUK bottles as they are closest in shape to the breast. No nipple confusion and properly shaped for jaw development.

[deleted account]

I'm not a huge fan of slings either. Having it on one shoulder hurt my back. I invested in an Ergo and it's fabulous. I have a 2.5 year old so I know what you mean. We also got a double stroller to help me keep the older one contained when we go out without Dad.

Emily - posted on 11/18/2011

23

18

1

if you keep it thawed for 24 hours though it has to be in an insulated cooler bag; just sitting out on the counter or something its only good for 6-8 hours.

Emily - posted on 11/18/2011

23

18

1

well i know if you freeze it then its supposed to be discarded 24 hours after it's been thawed, and if you deep freeze your milk then you can store it for 3-6 months.

Seirra - posted on 11/18/2011

32

14

0

i was thinking that but i dont kno how much would be enough for her and i dont kno how long i can let breastmilk stand for??

Emily - posted on 11/18/2011

23

18

1

I would stick to just breast feeding because it will probably upset her stomach having the formula. Why not try pumping some milk for when your on the go?

Celeste - posted on 11/18/2011

3,000

30

853

OK. That's a bummer. I loved mine and were very helpful with my twins while we were out.



Not sure what to tell you then. Do what you need to do. Just be aware of the risks of introducing a bottle this early.

Celeste - posted on 11/18/2011

3,000

30

853

Do you have a sling? Maybe nurse in a sling when you have to ride the bus?

Seirra - posted on 11/18/2011

32

14

0

i do nurse while out for the time being but i also have a 2 yr old and if im on the bus then its gonna be tricky wit 2 strollers

Celeste - posted on 11/18/2011

3,000

30

853

I agree with Sara. Giving a bottle of formula just is too much of a slippery slope right now. I wouldn't risk it.

Why not nurse while out? If you nurse in front of a mirror, you'll see what others see. I just wouldn't risk a bottle of formula right now

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms