can anyone help me out on items i will need breastfeeding?

Jessica - posted on 12/16/2009 ( 86 moms have responded )

24

16

0

i dont kno all the things i will need,never done it before.i will be a stay at home mom tho.i would jus like to know things i will need and recommended brands and all that good stuff.anything is appreciated:)thanks

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Dawn - posted on 12/21/2009

92

11

5

2 boobs - or 1 boob if you only have one, I know somebody who had a mastectomy and succesfully fed off 1 boob although, hard work in the beginning! The following advice especially around the 6/7 week mark when your baby goes through a growth spurt:

Have the following nearby downstairs with you:

Chocolates - or whatever your vice is.

A remote that's close by.

A flask of tea/coffee whatever you prefer (mine was hot choc) at a temp that won't hurt your lo. Remember to use decaff as caffeine affects iron absorbtion in your baby.

A film you can bear to watch more than once in one day on your dvd or a selection on a lap top if you have one.

A handy supply of books - make dp go to the library for you

At 20:00 move everything upstairs and try co-sleeping if you can or just lying down if you can't.

When upstairs have the intercom/baby thingy on - if you have one - so you can alert dp when you need something.

Bendy straws so you can drink whilst on your side.

An upstairs supply of chocolates - or whatever your vice is.

Have the remote for your tv in the bedroom (if you have) one handy.

More books.

As for food for you I found sandwiches/salad or anything not too warm could be eaten. You know you're at 6 weeks

when you have to switch sides with your baby to remove the crumbs from their ear - didn't do that honest;)

FORGET:

Housework
Looking after your dp - they are a grown up and can fend for themselves for a while
Ironing
Shopping - dp can make lists and shop!
Trying to host people to come to visit you - they know how to make a cup of tea and can make you something/wash up/hoover etc. in return for gazing at your lo. This works esp well if they are family
If you have more than one child it's dp's turn to step up to the plate and do a bit more hands on parenting, or you can get a family member to help.

You have 2 jobs whilst this is going on, feeding your child and not going crazy. Everything else can wait.

Hunker down and know that this too shall pass.

God, I wish I'd known about this before I started bf'ing - it wouldn't have been quite as much of a shock!

It *is* a wonderful experience but, you need to know that sometimes it's bloody hard work. Knowing what I know now? I'd do it all again it's that fantastic!

For bf'ing in public I use a bump band and whatever I'm wearing - I don't mind people catching a flash of boob but I *really* don't want them to see my flab! 99% of the time nobody will notice you, the people that do notice are probably mums who have bf'd themselves. If I see a woman bf'ing in public I make a point of going up to her and telling her how wonderful she is:)

You may find this guy VERY helpful - I did!

http://www.drjacknewman.com/

You'll really enjoy watching your child eat it's such a great experience, well done you for choosing bf'ing!

dxx

Minnie - posted on 12/16/2009

7,076

9

786

Need is a relative term.

You NEED breasts. That's it.

What I have found helpful other than that is a nice, soft baby carrier for nursing hands-free.

I would not pump unless you have to.

Shannon - posted on 12/22/2009

41

15

1

1. a pair of nice jugs:)

2. patience to get the latch down (a good latch is worth the effort!

3. breast pads

4. 2-3 nursing bras (bravado makes great ones, check ebay. also, a note on bras....the ones with no underwire are comfy but aren't very supportive for out and about. you will want to wear one to bed for a little while because of leaking)

5. a pump if you plan on being away for an extended period of time.



check out the resources page on my site http://www.organicbabydoula.com

Tiffanie - posted on 12/21/2009

3

12

0

Hi sweetie,

As a mommy who just weaned her 27 month old boy, I tell you that the thing I needed most was patience. I BF'ed my daughter to 19 months (but that was 10 years ago). It is a wonderful experience for both you and your baby...not to mention you will lose weight, the baby will gain all the antibodies to make them strong and healthy. Plus, formula is freaking expensive! You make the perfect food for your baby and it's free! Fantastic! .....oh, nursing pads, and keep a spare shirt in your diaper bag. (wet tea bags, I know it sounds weird, are good for relieving painful nipples early on) Patience! It is so worth it! Good luck!

Janna - posted on 12/21/2009

14

21

1

I agree with everyone else. Only a couple of things to add (I think, didnt fully read all of the other posts). I would recommend taking a nursing class, I did and I found it extremely helpful. The best thing I learned was that at first when your nipples are sore count to 20 when baby first latches and if you are still in pain after 20 it probably means that baby isnt latched properly, so just take baby off and relatch. Also, someone said something about Glamourmom tanks, Target carries nursing tanks as well and they are way CHEAPER!!! My son is now 10 months old and I still love them. They are so comfortable around the house right after baby is born and to sleep in!

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

86 Comments

View replies by

Barbara - posted on 07/31/2013

4

0

0

1)Reusable no leak nursing pads would be the top of my list,I love Naturekins brand
2) A pouch sling,no cover up needed when you nurse using this and it is a carrier to.I liked the Hot Sling brand.
3) nipple butter,I liked it better than lanolin cream as it was less sticky. I can't remember the brand I used.
4) A sports top with bra built in to use at night to hold the nursing pads in,sooooo much more comfy than using a bra at night and is the perfect jammy top.

Tara Lee - posted on 12/22/2009

241

22

34

Everyone pretty much covered everything. I just wanted to say "good luck", and "you'll be fine". You've already started out great by "asking for information".

I would look for a lactation consultant, they will help you get started. If there is not one available to you, you could try your local health unit. I know mine has an awsume Breastfeeding Clinic run by Nurses who specialize in BF. They were a God sent to me.

Again, Good Luck! and Best Wishes

P.S. If you have any more questions, this is a great place to ask. I have found the answers to most of the questions I had already posted here, and I didn't even need to post them myself. It's comforting to know there are others out there who feel the same as you or have the same struggles. The support on this site is the best.

Hannah - posted on 12/22/2009

7

12

0

LOTS of breast pads! I find the washable ones to be a money saver, although they are not discreet I use them at night. Definitely have syringes in case you need to supplement before your milk comes in (the hospital gave me several). I would definitely have a pump just in case. and stock up on everything!! the last thing you want to be doing a week after giving birth is running through the store trying to remember why you went in the first place!!

MarthaLynn - posted on 12/21/2009

65

55

7

The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding. It will be your Bible of breastfeeding. Order it here ----> http://store.llli.org/public Anything else is secondary, if you don't have support. Find a LLL group in your area, and start going!! :)

Lisa - posted on 12/21/2009

37

11

1

A good nursing bra, no specific brand, just whatever is comfy for you. I tried on every bra at Motherhood and nothing fit right, I ended up getting one at Target. I would also get some disposable nursing pads. They have some great one's at Target also or Babies R Us

[deleted account]

I agree. You don't need much. Just be sure to have time. Be available for your baby whenever he/she needs to feed or wants to comfort nurse. Just be present with him or her. Uninterrupted attention is the best thing you can give to your baby. I find that when I try to juggle something else like reading a magazine, she gets fussy. I can tell she is appreciative when I look at her and am attentive to her needs.



As far as *stuff*... I think a good book is valuable for reference. That's how I discovered I had a bad case of Thrush. My Dr. didn't even diagnosis it at first. I like Dr. Sear's Breastfeeding book out of all that I read. But a god BF website will do just fine like Kellysmom.com. You don't need a pump but mine did come in handy when I couldn't nurse for a few days due to severe pain. But I'm 4 months in and haven't used it since the first few weeks. Same for the Boppy. For me, nursing tanks and shirts are a must. I hate pulling up my shirt to expose my belly to everyone. Deep V-necks and button downs work great. I leaked a lot at first until I got in sync with my baby. I first got disposable pads, but I went through a lot. You never want to keep anything wet next to your breasts for too long... that's how I got the Thrush so I went with reusable bamboo ones. They're super soft and easy to wash.



Have a beverage always ready before you sit down to nurse. Without fail, I get extremely thirsty during the first few minutes of each feeding.



Best of luck. Enjoy every minute of it. It goes by so fast.

Clarissa - posted on 12/20/2009

5

11

0

Yes, nursing pads!!! Don't skimp on them because they will be your best friend. :) I like Johnson and Johnson's nursing pads. and definately have a small wash cloth next to your as your baby gets used to your let down. He/she will eventually learn how much and when to drink when your let-down is coming but in the beginning, baby will pull away and you will spray everywhere!!!! ...that is when you grab your towel. :) GOOD LUCK!

Elizabeth - posted on 12/20/2009

78

13

6

Most importantly support and determination! BF can be challenging and its important to have support to keep you going. I def suggest researching so you are very knowledgable about BF. Being knowledgable allows you to take control of the issues that may arise especially being a first time mom (I was so stressed with my first, I was lucky to have the support of the childrens hospital since I had none at home) You DONT need bottles nor formula for backup, there is no point and it only gives you an easy out in a stress moment of weakness that too many women choose and regret later (many of my friends really regret this they know that if they had stayed determined then they would have made it) Everyone has given really great advice!

Mrs. Tisha - posted on 12/20/2009

14

560

2

Quoting Jessica:

can anyone help me out on items i will need breastfeeding?

i dont kno all the things i will need,never done it before.i will be a stay at home mom tho.i would jus like to know things i will need and recommended brands and all that good stuff.anything is appreciated:)thanks



Hi, Jessica! Nice of you thinking 'bout breastfeeding ur child, that's a great choice for ur newly born child. Matter of fact, I bought all my nursing bras, nursing stuffs & children stuffs from "Mothercare." It's a British Company in "England" & all their products were "high quality products" which I loved & enjoyed. I've two children. My daughter is ten years old & my son is four years old. They both breastfed exclusively w/o any formula.



For my daughter, she breastfed 'til she was thirteen mos old & for my son 'til he was thirty-one mos old. I definitely enjoyed breastfeeding both of my children & I used Lansinoh HPA Lanolin for my nipples. I loved the Mothercare's nursing pads. Finally, my advice to you is eat healthy meals ev'ryday & drink plenty of fluids girlfriend inorder for ur breastmilk to flow w/o any stress related issues.

Nicole - posted on 12/20/2009

293

36

24

i didnt read through everyones lists, but just want ed to mention, Babysence make a baby sling that i use to feed him in public (as well as carry him arround ofcourse) hands free and descreet. i also use Carrywell feeding tops and playtex feeding bras. this allows me to feed one handed and descreetly in public. plus a recieving blanket at first while i was learning to feed descreetly - but once i got the just of it i didnt need the blankie anymore.

Pigeon nipple protectors (comes in two different sizes depending on your nipple size) helped me get through the pain when my nipples were getting used to breastfeeding, as well as lanisoh iontment - expensive but works like a bomb. as a stay-at-home-mom i found the manual breast pump to be fine - took me 10 min to pump both breasts, but if i had the money i would have splurdged on an electric, just cos its faster. but it's not a major necessety - - and my hand has never gotten dore or cramped up. its very easy. i used the avent manual pump. fenugreek capsules helped alot to keep my breast milk supply up.

Kimberley - posted on 12/20/2009

10

37

0

My pediatrician, at my 6mo old's very first appt, gave me these little strips called Second Skin, and they were a LIFESAVER! Forget Lanolin, forget anything else, just buy ALOT of boxes of Second Skin. Their in the band aid section of Walgreens or CVS. Their essentially strips made of water that don't hurt whatsoever when you put then on your nipples, and they heal you REALLY FAST. Mine were bleeding and cracked since I had not started them immediately after I started breast feeding, but they healed me, so fast, when I was in so much pain, and wanted so much to keep breast feeding. Just keep them in the fridge and put them on as needed. I kept them on for 24hrs, and when I would breast feed, I'd put them on ice, so they would be nice and cold when I was done. Believe me when I say, they saved me! If i had started them immediately upon breast feeding, I probably would not have had the cracked nipples, so start them as soon as you can! Hope this info helps!

Ann - posted on 12/20/2009

2

1

0

You've gotten a lot of great advice on pads, bras and "boppy's" I would only add always carry at least one extra shirt for you in your diaper bag or even in the car (for when you don't have baby with you) because as you've seen pads are a must but not always foolproof its a good idea...plus its nice for the times when other bodily fluids contaminate the mommy LOL. Oh yeah, and a lot of patience, if this is your first go at this, take care, it's a learning curve and if you find any difficulty call a lactation expert at your doctors office or the hospital.

Serene - posted on 12/20/2009

45

34

1

Brands: If you are in Australia,
Nursing pads: Pigeon, Avent and Youll Love Coles
Bras: Hestia and Triumph

Serene - posted on 12/20/2009

45

34

1

Nursing bras, cloths for leakage (more comfortable than a bra overnight unless you can get a sleep bra, and cloth nappies are BRILLIANT for this!!) and nursing pads. Thats it! Oh, nipples of course LOL

Brittney - posted on 12/20/2009

5

14

1

I wouldn't get anything to start other than a sports bra that's what o used insnstead of expensive nursing bras.and once you get established on nursing then go get what you need k was successful with nursing even after a long battle with a Preemie but my sister in law got all the stuff for.nursing and never could after she left hospital

Sarah - posted on 12/19/2009

21

21

2

I would get a GOOD pump if you intend on pumping and saving milk. I had a crappy pump at first and it TORE me apart and ended up having to spend more money on a new pump. I have a Medela pump now. They are pricey but wonderful. Nursing pads definitly. Storage bags if you are pumping (Lansinoh makes them).. also some Nipple Cream. And Gerber makes these things that are re-useable hot/cold pads to put in a bra.... microwave/freezer and can be hand washed. I got them at target- they are for engorgement and pains. And I've used sports bras because they have pressure so when I am engorged it's a little more comfortable. GOOD LUCK!

Tracy - posted on 12/19/2009

67

26

10

You've been given lots of good advice so far... one thing I ended up needing was a sheild. It goes over your nipple to help with latching. Lots of moms don't need it but if you do don't feel bad!! Just make sure you do lots of pumping to stimulate the nipples as you can dry up.

Tiera - posted on 12/19/2009

57

29

1

Spend the money on a good pump . . . cheap ones are worthless! "Soothies" gel pads for those first few weeks . . . they are the best thing ever! Also Gerber makes something that looks like a big tube of lip balm for cracked nipples . . . much more user friendly than lanolin and you don't have to wash it off before feeding, doesn't taste bad either.

Natasha - posted on 12/19/2009

10

19

0

You've got what you really need - your boobs. Other than the girls, you should find support - like the local La Leche League. You should also decide if you're going to adhere to a strict feeding schedule or nurse on cue. (I nurse on cue....my son wasn't keen on the schedule. Sometimes he waits an hour between feedings, sometimes it's 4 hours.)
Here's what may be helpful:
a nursing pillow (like a Boppy)
nipple cream (lanolin)
a nursing cover/apron
nipple pads (you WILL leak)

Good luck and happy nursing!

Jessica - posted on 12/19/2009

9

16

0

you are goin to need someone to give good support and motivation cause it can be very frustrating specially in the middle of the night!

Andrea - posted on 12/19/2009

12

20

0

nursing bras. nursing cover for out of the house days, a pump if you ever need to be away from the baby for more than 3 hours, breast pads ( Gerber makes reusable ones that are cloth and washable in stead of the expensive disposable ones I found them at Target ) I bought the Lanolin nipple cream I think I used it once so you could get some in case your nipples get sore.

Ashley - posted on 12/19/2009

31

14

2

I know a lot of people use the nursing pillow...I usually crossed one leg over the other if I needed a little bit more leverage.

Ruma - posted on 12/19/2009

28

52

0

nursing pads(for the leaking breasts), breast pump,nursing bra.and yeah nipcare ointment for the sore nipples which you will have in first week of breastfeeding.

Tamara - posted on 12/18/2009

8

22

0

I also agree with the rag or receiving blanket, or even a hand towel down before you start feeding, otherwise you will be covered in milk and that's is not a pleasant smell after an hour if you forget or do not have time to change it right away. I highly recommend Lansinoh nursing pads, the are thin, but can hold a lot of fluid and they come individually wrapped so they are easier for travel. My best advice is to buy the tank tops with the built-in bras, that are absolutely amazing, you can wear them as an undershirt they are a little looser but still very supportive and are usually cheap, a very sound and comfy investment for a nursing mother. Good luck:)

Cynthia - posted on 12/18/2009

252

84

9

Quoting mandy:

I tried to go the less expensive route and bought a single pump to start with. I soon realized that wasn't going to cut it when I went back to work, so I highly recommend a double pump if you plan on pumping at all. The single pump just took too long.
Also, I recommend having a burp rag in hand every time you feed, at least at first. I used to leak from the opposite side I was feeding on every time my son nursed until I got smart and started using a burp rag or towel to cover it up.
I agree with everyone else's suggestions for breast pads and lanolin. Best of luck to you!


I DEFINETLY AGREE PUT A RAG!! LOL MAN WAS I A MESS!!

Noa - posted on 12/18/2009

2

1

0

Hi Jessica,
I saw that someone recomended you the boppy pilow. I used somthing similar but much much better with my kids. It's called YOGIBO. I received it when my oldest son was born (he is now 7) and we still use it to watch t.v. It's amazing. They have a realy nice website www.yogibo.com. Good luck!!!

Ashley - posted on 12/18/2009

31

14

2

Technically all you need to breastfeed is you and your baby. My daughter was having a hard time getting her fill, so the nurse recommended this nipple shield...DO NOT USE IT! My daughter got addicted to it and used it up until the day she stopped breastfeeding. If I lost it or forgot it at home, I was screwed...she wouldn't eat without it, period. A lot of nurses, doctors, and lactation consultants will tell you things to discourage you from breastfeeding (I know they did with me), but know that it takes a lot of practice and eventually will become a very easy and natural thing to do...just keep at it! Also, when you first have your baby, your milk won't be "regulated" and everytime you hear a baby cry, think about your baby, or go a period of time without feeding your baby, you'll start to lactate out of nowhere. They have these pads you insert in your bra to soak up the leakage. I always used the bigger ones as the thin ones never held. I know a lot of breastfeeding moms use nursing bras, I always found them to be a pain in the butt. You can always pull up your regular bra when you need to feed your baby. If you produce a lot of milk like I did, you may need something to soak up the side your baby isn't feeding on. I would always use a towel/rag or shirt when I was at home and used one of those breastmilk pads I mentioned earlier while I was out.

Ashley - posted on 12/18/2009

31

14

2

Technically all you need to breastfeed is you and your baby. My daughter was having a hard time getting her fill, so the nurse recommended this nipple shield...DO NOT USE IT! My daughter got addicted to it and used it up until the day she stopped breastfeeding. If I lost it or forgot it at home, I was screwed...she wouldn't eat without it, period. A lot of nurses, doctors, and lactation consultants will tell you things to discourage you from breastfeeding (I know they did with me), but know that it takes a lot of practice and eventually will become a very easy and natural thing to do...just keep at it! Also, when you first have your baby, your milk won't be "regulated" and everytime you hear a baby cry, think about your baby, or go a period of time without feeding your baby, you'll start to lactate out of nowhere. They have these pads you insert in your bra to soak up the leakage. I always used the bigger ones as the thin ones never held. I know a lot of breastfeeding moms use nursing bras, I always found them to be a pain in the butt. You can always pull up your regular bra when you need to feed your baby. If you produce a lot of milk like I did, you may need something to soak up the side your baby isn't feeding on. I would always use a towel/rag or shirt when I was at home and used one of those breastmilk pads I mentioned earlier while I was out.

Kristen - posted on 12/18/2009

1

0

0

Nursing pads, nursing bras, lanosil (I bought it but personally didn't really need it), breast pump and the nursing pillow that I would suggest is the "My Brest Friend" nursing pillow. I had a poppy that I used at first, but as my son got older and heavier, the Brest Friend has more support and is easier to go hands free if needed. Sometimes patience is a plus. There were times that I just wanted to give up and turn to formula. But then I would look into my son's eyes and just enjoyed the special bond that we have during that time.... Our time.

[deleted account]

Nursing bras, and nursing pads. I highly recommend getting washable pads, as you'll spend a fortune on disposable ones otherwise. I have 3 pairs of bamboo and 3 pairs of cotton ones, and the bamboo ones are just the best, they are so soft and comfortable especially in the beginning on sore nipples. You can just throw them in the regular wash, so not really any extra work involved.
I also have a breast pump, although it's not strictly needed. However, I do recommend you do some research on which one and where you would buy if you needed, because you might have to rush out and get one (I did). It helps to express when you have very sore nipples, it just gives them a rest and chance to heal. Better to express for a few days than end up giving up breastfeeding altogether.
A cover is a good idea as well, but it depends on how self-conscious you are breastfeeding in public. I am, especially as my little boy likes to take frequent breaks to look around, so it would expose me quite a bit. I have a cover that is like an apron with a stiff opening at the top, so I can see down. It's called "bebe au lait" (Google search should come up with it), and I highly recommend it, it's fantastic.

Stacy - posted on 12/18/2009

125

16

15

If you are going to feed out in public and want to have something covering you this website has a great nursing cover! http://uddercovers.com
I have tried with a blanket (worked good at first) and I tried with Walmarts nursing cover ( hated it... one size fit all didnt fit me :( I was always exposed).
Also, I don't know if anyone else mentioned it but burp rags(cloth diapers) are a must in my opinion... my daughter would sometimes randomly stop nursing and I would be spraying every where, they were the only thing that seemed to absorb all the milk coming out... and they are great for spit up!

Brenda - posted on 12/18/2009

2,386

62

250

I do suggest getting lansinoh though. If you have a hoover vacuum like I did, you'll be sore, and it can help keep your nipples from cracking. :) I used it every feed and in between for the first four weeks and never got cracked or bleeding nipples but I was sore as all get out. However, it passed, but with my first it didn't happen like that, he was a lazy nurser. My seven month old is a little vacuum.... :)

Deborah - posted on 12/18/2009

3

22

0

NIPPLE SHIELDS!!! I know they have a bad rep with lactation consultants and you may not have a hard time feeding, but trust me, I would have quit without them. My sister on the other hand, had no problems and her daughter latched right on, she only experienced minor pain. I used them for about 8 weeks and gradually weaned myself off of them, but I'm so glad I stuck with it despite their "bad" rep. They did not mess up my son's latch at all, and made me enjoy the whole process so much more.

Also...nursing pads, I like the Lansinoh brand best. If you can get a breast pump I would really encourage you to do that, it will help with the engourgement you'll experience. A nursing bra or 2 or 3 would be great as well! Best in nude, black, and then white!

And last but not least...a person to push you not to quit, to encourage you and to sit with you during those late night feedings for the first few days after you come home. I hope you have an easy time of it, but please know, there is nothing as rewarding and it has been the hardest part of being a new mother for me, but I'm sooo thankful I didn't give up!

Nicole - posted on 12/18/2009

16

8

1

I'm a first time mom and some of the things I found useful were:
- Nursing pads just in case of a leak
- Boppy! Love my boppy.
- Nursing Shawl and/or Sling for nursing in public.
- Pump, I have the Melda free style pump, its a lifesaver, and worth every penny. I've been pumping since my son was a couple of days old. It helped when we were just getting used to feeding and now helps keep my milk suppy since he sleeps 8 to 12 hours at night. I can pump and have milk frozen just in case we need it. Now that hes started to eat cearl I use the stored milk to mix with cearl.
- Nursing Bra is a must makes life easier.
- Don't give up learning to breastfeed can be a difficult journey for both you and baby. Its definetly a full time job in itself and takes lots of commitment.

Dawnelle - posted on 12/18/2009

6

10

0

I would recommend nursing bras - a day bra and an easy access bra for sleeping; they do have a sports bra nursing bra and just a nylon one at Motherhood Maternity. Lansolin disposable breast pads - walmart is the most affordable - I have not had a leak. My son had a difficult time latching on and I was given a nipple cover at the hospital. In case they do not give you one or offer it you can get one at Target or Babies 'R Us - It was a medela breast shield. This helped my son latch and my nipple did not get torn up while he figured it out. I tried the breast cream but didn't find that is was that useful. I would by some soothies, they are great if you do have sore nipples. Place them in the fridge and then you can put them on your breasts. I would also recommend a u-shaped pillow, boppy pillow, or a body pillow to help you with feedings. It helps to hold most of the baby's wait and it is also nice to have for night feedings.



Hope this helps



I would also recommend a breast pump. Medela free style pump is wonderful. It is a very strong pump, and it is one step down from the Hospital grade swing. I would talk with your insurance company and see if they will issue you a pump or if there is one you can rent. Also I know with some child birthing classes, they may offer you a coupon or discount on pumps.

D - posted on 12/18/2009

30

0

2

Nursing bras or do as I do, wear comfy sports bras when at home. Nursing pads (10 atleast) I sometimes go through 2 pairs a day and might not have time to do laundry during the week. Breast pump, a manual one work better then electric. A nursing pillow or a comfortable pillow for your lap. It makes all the difference. Burp clothes, you will sometimes spray when baby pull off and you may leak onto your tummy or shirt while feeding. I personally did not need any breast cream, I got very lucky but it is smart to have some on hand. Good luck!

Elisabeth - posted on 12/18/2009

24

15

1

I agree with what one Mom said above that "need" is a relative term.

These are the things I needed ( I am nursing my 7th child but didn't have anything left from the previous child because she is now 7 years old). I am a stay at home mom as well so I don't have to "dress up" for work but I do like to look nice because it makes me feel good.

- tops that are 1 size larger ( my nursing breasts just will not fit into a medium size top without looking ridiculous!) Nursing tops are too expensive. I mean why spend $40 on a top?? Here in the midwest I found some nice ones at Meijer's.
- for the first 9 months postpartum... Jeans that are comfortable and yoga pants ( Walmart is carrying Lee jeans that are straight cut and actually make you look good even at 1 month post partum!)
-Nursing bras at Target.
- I bought a second hand Boppy pillow from an extended family member but I don't use it for nursing much as I do as a place to prop up Baby.
- a bassinet that I keep on my side of the bed so I don't have to get up and walk to another room to take care of her at night.

- Most importantly I have a really supportive husband who is willing to help in any way that he can. Now that baby is 3 months old I can nurse her up and leave her with him so I can go out grocery shopping and be gone for an hour easily. He also makes sure that I have time to get a nice hot shower every night ( wash off the baby spit up before bed).

- Also importantly I find that I feel "touched out" most days by 8 pm....meaning that I am giving out so much all day and night long that I am needing some attention - a back/neck rub etc.... I have learned to tell him exactly what I need and he is more than happy to oblige. This is important to help alleviate that burned out feeling. It is ok to admit it when you are tired. Nursing is work, and then add in all the things you do as a house wife too. What a rewarding job!!!

[deleted account]

all of the suggestions here are wonderful....
I was incredibly BROKE when my son was born, I found ways to improvise for the few things you MIGHT need to breastfeed.
The ladies all mention NO WIRE in their nursing bras... .there's a reason for no wire.
An uncomfortable wire digging in can block one of your milk ducts.. Just make sure that the bra you choose is going to be comfortable, with nothing digging in under your arms. This is from experience.. my midwife filled me in on the wire thing. (ps, walmart has a decent nursing bra for $12.00)
I couldnt afford a breastpump, I expressed by hand when I had to.. It was maybe a dozen times over the first 6 months. I also couldn't afford disposable breastpads to catch overactive let down, I cut a cloth diaper into four squares and hemmed up the edges, One of these tucked in your bra will catch any leaks.
I never had a nice expensive Boppy pillow, I'm sure that it would have been wonderful, but instead we just used a big fluffy pillow from our bed. I could smoosh it and adjust it so the baby was positioned perfectly.
I also never used a nipple cream. I applied a few cold compresses the first week, (usually a bag of frozen peas, or the bottom of an aluminum can) I only found the nipple cracking once, I started applying a little expressed milk. (expressed milk also cleared up a NASTY burn I had on my thigh too, it is wonderful medicine ;)
I never got one of those boobie covers for out in public either. I have a sling, With a receiving blanket safety pinned to the top. The blanket can either drape over the baby, or hang down your back if you don't need it now.
Necessity is the mother of invention, all of the things here are just going to make life EASIER... but when it all boils down, all you really need is a boobie... you'll find that out. Everything else is just a convenience.

Jenny - posted on 12/18/2009

2

1

0

* Nursing Bra's - At least 6

* Breast Pads - so far the best ones for me are Tomme Teppe (you need lots of them)

* Breastfeeding tops/dress (if you are planning to go out and breastfeed whe out and about you will need easy descreet access)

* Breastfeeding pillow (very important -as the baby grows your arms/back will really hurt) - I got a Breastfriend -it has a strap and a pocket quite handy.

* Muslin clothes - need to stuff one under your breast to collect any drips

* Rocking chair/chair with a high back - these are better for feeding specially in the early days when all you do is feed the baby.

* If you want to combine bottle and breastfeeding - you need a breast pump (medel) - I have a double its supper quick. Sterilised Breast milk bags and bottles.



Hope this helps.

Paula - posted on 12/18/2009

4

13

0

i used pigeon nursing pads with both my babies. I found they werent as noticeable and worked very well never had a leak very discret.

I had a pump just a kanasen manual only $30 just for when my milk came in i expressed a sml amount only to make me comfortable till her next feed. was just two barrels inside another. Very simple but not real good for everyday use..

Id say just nursing pads, nursing bras and a pillow would be great. Doesnt have to be an expensive nursing one however thy are good.. i used a boomarang pillow and was only $10. Optional for in public a nursing blanket to cover urself mine was a cheapie but a goodie..

Dont forget the face washers put in freezer for few hours for day 2-4 when ur milk comes in. Either that or the old cabbage leaves in the fridge do the trick cause even the second time around it was quite painful (think is worse cause i am a e cup or G while breastfeeding and that didnt fit properly)

I found getn fitted late in the pregnancy wasnt enough as they said a G (with room to grow) but it didnt fit once my milk came in. Get some now to cover you for the first week or two then go back get fitted again if doesnt feel right.

You will need a burbing cloth even the cloth nappies work great if u have a puky bub like i did and another for urself incase of leaks. When my milk first came in i was huge, midwife said for me to feed off one side and let the other side leak freely..

Miranda - posted on 12/17/2009

126

29

4

Nursing pads! I love the Lansinoh brand! They have a sticky part that will make sure they will stay in place. A "boppy" or some type of pillow to help during the feedings. "Nipple cream" to make sure that your nipples don't get chapped (I bought some, but never really used it because I didn't really have a problem with chapping, but I know some women do). A double breast pump (if you can afford one, or check with your local Lactating clinic, they sometimes rent them out). Having a towel near by so when you are done feeding if you start to "stream" you can cover up quickly, and also a some great nursing bras! The best of luck to you! :) Don't get discouraged, it is a wonderful thing that you will be doing for you child!

Liane - posted on 12/17/2009

169

50

13

Really to get started you just need boobs :) I found that the My BrestFriend Pillow also worked wonders (much better than a boppy as you can strap it around your body if you need to get up and move around). Other than that, the breast pump, etc can wait until you've established a good feeding routine (about 6 weeks or so). Oh, a comfy chair with foot rest/ottoman may be helpful to get comfy as well! Good luck :)

Misty - posted on 12/17/2009

33

40

2

definately a nursing bra is a must not just for outing but at home your breasts will become heavy and jammies that open in the front for sure for the first while with a new baby I didn't want to get up and dressed every day so slink around in comfy jammies that unbutton in the front and don't be too eager about the pump I thought I needed it right away I find the pump to hurt worse that anything she feeds gentle that thing hurts I would rather try to find a place to feed in public not to mention your baby might not take to a bottle mine doesn't and won't take a bottle from me it is like she knows I have the master milk supply lol and good luck just relax and don't get frustrated with it my first I was so frustrated and tired I gave up after a month we are now on month 3 with my second and it is now second nature no pain no leaks just wonderful

[deleted account]

Make sure to get a lactation specialist consult! They are a world of help. Breastfeeding isn't always as easy and natural as it seems it should be. Help from the lactation nurse made it the most positive experience ever!
As far as thing go, I think the most important things will be a Boppy, good nursing bras, nursing tanks, nursing pads ( like Lansinoh brand) There are creams and gel pads that are nice to have on hand at first for sore nipples, however, if the baby is latching on correctly this shouldn't be too much of a problem. I like the book, The Nursing Mother's Companion. I highly recommend it. You may also want to buy a pump to help with milk supply and to store some milk in the freezer if you ever need to get out, or to let dad or other caregiver give the baby a bottle. The lactation consult would help you decide on the need for a pump and which type. They are expensive, so I would wait on that.
Good luck! Breastfeeding is a wonderful experience.

Melissa - posted on 12/17/2009

22

18

5

I tried nursing for the first 2 months, and it was very hard for me. I bought several products that would help. Obviously, nursing pads, nursing bra, boppy pillow or something similar, lanolin lotion. I had to use a nipple shield b/c my son wouldn't latch on (the hospital gave me one). I bought a cheaper breast pump and found it to be worthless. Then I invested in a Medela pump and it worked much better. I also bought storage bags to freeze my milk in for later use. I made the mistake of not pumping right away and my milk supply decreased within weeks. A breastfeeding clinic can be very helpful, check with your hospital for one.

Amber - posted on 12/17/2009

106

17

5

Everyone has pretty much covered everything, but I wanted to suggest an alternate use for the Lansinoh nipple ointment...Since it's winter and I'm washing my hands even more than usual, they are super dry and cracked. Lotion isn't cutting it, so I put some of the nipple ointment on my hands before bed. It works great. Its a little messy, that's why I do it before bed.

Jessica - posted on 12/17/2009

382

24

78

Quoting Jocelyn:

Boobs! lol You don't really need anything else :P
But a big comfy nursing pillows makes things a lot easier. I'm a sahm as well and I have a little hand pump that I use about once a week. I good nursing bra is a must (well for me anyways, I have giant boobs lol)


LOL this is funny. Was the answer that popped into my head. All these things are nice to have but thb, not nessasary. Yeah you can buy the nursing pads to stop leaks. or you could just use a normal pad. Buy a cheap pkt of panty liners and cut them to size. Pumps are only needed if your planning on sharing the breast feeding. (i didnt like doing that, breastfeeding what MY job, if SO or grandparents wanted to do something for baby they could change his/her nappy, bath them and play with them) Nipple cream isnt really needed either, you can use an every day moisturiser. just make sure you clean your boob before latching baby on.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms