*Edited* BREASTFEEDING FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Nicole - posted on 02/28/2010 ( 122 moms have responded )

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LIST OF QUESTIONS ANSWERED IN THIS THREAD:

1) How long should I breastfeed/When should I stop breastfeeding (wean)?

2) Why does it hurt when I breastfeed?

3) How do I know my baby is getting enough breast milk?

4) Why does my baby want to breastfeed all the time?

5) When should I introduce solids to my breastfed baby?

6) Can I take birth control while breastfeeding?

7) Why is my breastfed baby gassy and fussy?

8) When will I get my period back/Is it normal to have a period while breastfeeding?

9) Can I breastfeed while pregnant?

10) My baby hasn't had a bowel movement in a few days. Is this normal?

11) Why is my milk supply going away?

12) Why can't I get much milk out when pumping?

13) Why is my baby refusing to latch on to my breast?

14) Why won't my breastfed baby take a bottle?

15) Why is my baby falling asleep at the breast?

16) Will my baby bite when he gets teeth/How do I stop my baby from biting while teething?

17) Is it possible to lose weight/gain weight while breastfeeding?









1) HOW LONG SHOULD I BREASTFEED/WHEN SHOULD I STOP BREASTFEEDING (WEAN)?

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING for the first 6 MONTHS and continued breastfeeding for AT LEAST 12 MONTHS. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends UP TO TWO YEARS or longer if both mother and baby are comfortable.



2) WHY DOES IT HURT WHEN I BREASTFEED?

Breastfeeding SHOULD NOT hurt. If it hurts, there is a problem. Yes, breastfeeding can be uncomfortable in the beginning for some, but when breastfeeding is painful, it could be more. Most likely, it is a latch problem. When a baby is being latched to the breast, he should lead with the chin, the nose should not be smashed into the breast and the baby should be able to look up at you (meaning the nipple should be pointing towards the roof of the baby's mouth). If, with some practice, latches are still painful, seek help from someone with specialized training in lactation (i.e. Certified Lactation Consultant, La Leche League Leader, etc.). DO NOT let it get worse before seeking help.



3) HOW DO I KNOW MY BABY IS GETTING ENOUGH BREAST MILK?

Wet diapers -- A newborn should have one wet diaper the first day of life, at two days old, two wet diapers and so on until 4 days old. A baby 4 days and older should have 4-6 sopping wet diapers in 24 hours. The colour of urine is also a good indication of adequate hydration. A baby that is transferring milk well, will have light, pale urine. If it is dark (like apple juice) with a strong odor, seek the help of a professional.

Stools (bowel movements) -- If your baby is younger than 4-5 days old, she will have tar-like stools (meconium). Usually at 3 days old, the meconium starts to thin and by 5 days it should be yellow (sometimes green), watery and seedy. Babies younger than 4 weeks usually have several bowel movements in a 24 hour period.

Weight gain -- It is normal for an infant to lose weight in the first few days of life, but most babies are back to their birth weight by 2 weeks old. If your baby is 2 weeks or older and gaining weight, this is a good sign that your baby is getting enough. REMEMBER: Scales can vary and growth charts don't always include breastfed infants (they are usually based off of formula-fed infants). How your baby will gain weight can be due to genetics. As long as your baby is GAINING WEIGHT STEADILY, how ever much (or little) weight that may be, is what is important.

DO NOT JUDGE MILK SUPPLY by how much you can pump or express (babies transfer milk better), by how frequently your baby eats or if she cries after feedings, by how full (or NOT full) your breasts feel, or if your baby will take a bottle after a feeding. Only with very RARE medical conditions, does a mother's milk not provide what her baby needs. Feeding on cue (on demand) is the best way to keep up adequate milk supply.

Also see http://www.kellymom.com/newman/04enough_... for more information and always seek professional help by someone qualified in lactation and infant feeding if there are concerns about your baby's health or your milk supply.



4) WHY DOES MY BABY WANT TO BREASTFEED ALL THE TIME?

Babies (like adults) are all different. Some need to eat quite frequently, while others do not. All babies have growth spurts and usually eat more frequently during this time. Do not be discouraged by frequent feedings when weight gain is steady and baby is having adequate wet diapers (5-6 sopping wet diapers a day).



5) WHEN SHOULD I INTRODUCE SOLIDS TO MY BREASTFED BABY?

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) says that a baby should receive ONLY breast milk (or formula-breast milk is preferred) for the FIRST 6 MONTHS of life. Then solids can be “introduced” as a SUPPLEMENT to breastfeeding. Try to remember the rhyme “food for fun until they are one”.



6) CAN I TAKE BIRTH CONTROL WHILE BREASTFEEDING?

It is always important to remember to never take any medication without consulting with a physician first. IF your physician determines it is okay to take birth control, then it should be a progesterone-only birth control. Avoid birth controls containing estrogen. Preferably Micronor (the “mini-pill”). Injection birth control should not be the first choice because if any ill side effects occur, it can not be undone. Birth control should never be started prior to 6 weeks postpartum when milk supply is not yet established.



7) WHY IS MY BREASTFED BABY GASSY AND FUSSY?

It is normal for a baby (just like adults) to become gassy from time to time. It can be just as uncomfortable to them as it can be for us. But there are a few things that can cause a baby to have very uncomfortable gas and tummy troubles. 1) Some can be attributed to what the breastfeeding mother eats. An intolerance to cow's milk is quite common in humans. Soy can also be an irritant. Other gassy foods may bother your baby's stomach. You can eliminate these things if you notice that it becomes a problem. 2) Foremilk/Hindmilk Inbalance happens when a baby gets too much foremilk and not enough hindmilk. This can happen for a few reasons. Some examples are an over-active letdown or an oversupply, not enough time at the breast during each feeding or switching from one side to the other in the same feeding too early. “Block nursing” can help (see: http://www.kellymom.com/bf/supply/fast-l... under “Adjust your supply to better match baby's needs”). 3) And of course, anytime your baby seems uncomfortable, please remember to also seek medical advice from a physician to be sure.



8) WHEN WILL I GET MY PERIOD BACK/IS IT NORMAL TO HAVE A PERIOD WHILE BREASTFEEDING? This varies from woman to woman. How often your baby breastfeeds, whether you supplement, or if you take birth control can determine when you will have a period. It is quite normal for some breastfeeding women to get a period within weeks of delivering, while some might not have their monthly visitor for a year or more.



9) CAN I BREASTFEED WHILE PREGNANT?

It is usually perfectly safe to breastfeed while pregnant. Many women breastfeed during their pregnancies and then go on to "tandem" nurse (nurse both their newborn child and older toddler). If you are still worried, or have a history of miscarriage, it is always best to consult the professional attending your pregnancy (i.e. your midwife, obstetrician, certified nurse midwife).



10) MY BABY HASN'T HAD A BOWEL MOVEMENT IN A FEW DAYS. IS THIS NORMAL?

Every baby is different. Although it is quite common for breastfed babies to have very frequent bowel movements, some may not. Breast milk is very easily digested and for some babies this may mean they have very little to discard. There is no need to worry if your baby can go up to a week without a bowel movement UNLESS your baby is showing signs of distress. It never hurts to ask a doctor if you are concerned.



11) WHY IS MY MILK SUPPLY GOING AWAY?

1) ALWAYS FEED YOUR BABY ON CUE. (Cues-rooting, putting hands/fingers/fist in mouth, smacking lips, etc. Crying is a late feeding cue.) This will help keep an adequate milk supply. 2) If you are supplementing it is quite common for a mother to start losing her milk supply. This is why supplementation should be avoided, UNLESS medically necessary. 3) If you are not supplementing and you are feeding on cue, it may just APPEAR that your milk supply is reducing. Pumps are not a good indicator of milk supply. Pumps do not transfer milk as well as a baby. So, while pumping a woman may only get one ounce of milk (or even less), her baby is getting much more. Nursing frequency is also not a good indicator of milk supply. If a baby is going through a growth spurt, is sick, or in need of comfort for any reason, he may need to nurse more frequently during this time.



12) WHY CAN'T I GET MUCH MILK OUT WHEN PUMPING?

First, you should know that a pump does not transfer milk as efficiently as your baby does. Second, your breasts are probably supplying JUST ENOUGH to sustain your baby's needs and it takes time for your breasts to respond to the pump. PUMPING TIPS: 1) Always breastfeed your baby FIRST. Pump between feedings. If your baby wants to eat right after pumping, this is okay, let them eat at the breast. This will only encourage more milk production. 2) Do not get discouraged! Keep pumping even if you notice that nothing is coming out. It will take a few sessions for the breasts to respond to the stimulation of the pump. 3) Continue to pump at least 5 minutes AFTER the flow has stopped. 4) If you can become coordinated enough, pumping one breast while your baby eats at the other is a great way to get expressed milk AND to build supply. REMEMBER: The pump is NOT a good indicator of your actual milk supply.



13) WHY IS MY BABY REFUSING TO LATCH ON TO MY BREAST?

This can be attributed to several things: Baby was introduced to an artificial nipple (bottle/pacifier) too early (it is best to wait at least 4 weeks before giving artificial nipples), baby is sick (a stuffy nose can make it hard to breathe, an ear infection can make it painful to breastfeed, etc.), baby was aggressively forced/pushed to the breast to achieve latch on, etc. If baby is sick, make sure to get the baby seen by a doctor and keep her nose free of mucus by suctioning nose before feedings. Using a humidifier may help, too. MOST IMPORTANT when trying to latch a non-latcher: SKIN TO SKIN CONTACT! Lots of it! Your baby needs to associate your breasts with a place of comfort and warmth and love. This WILL encourage them to latch on. AND RELAX! A baby will not want to latch on to a stressed mother, so remember to give yourself lots of praise and cut yourself some slack.



14) WHY WON'T MY BREASTFED BABY TAKE A BOTTLE?

It is quite common for a breastfed baby to refuse to eat from a bottle and some may never take a bottle from their mother, but here are some tips: Always use a nipple that is wider at the base and thinner at the top (like a breast nipple), use very slow flowing nipple, have someone else give the bottle where the baby does not see or hear you, hold him in his favorite breastfeeding position while feeding with the bottle and, last but not least, be patient. REMEMBER: Make sure to express your milk when your baby receives milk from a bottle and expressed milk is the preferable supplement.



15) WHY IS MY BABY FALLING ASLEEP AT THE BREAST?

Jaundice, medications passing from your breast milk, or a slow let-down are some of the more common reasons a baby will fall asleep before eating at the breast. Stripping your baby down to her diaper, limiting sedation-causing medication, tickling her feet, and using breast compressions (see: http://www.kellymom.com/newman/15breast_...) are some ways you can keep a sleepy baby awake at the breast.



16) WILL MY BABY BITE WHEN HE GETS TEETH/HOW DO I STOP MY BABY FROM BITING WHILE TEETHING?

Very simple. If your baby is biting, he is not eating or not latched on properly. It is impossible for a baby that is latched correctly, to bite. Remove your baby from the breast if you notice that he is done eating and/or playing at the breast. ESPECIALLY, if he bites. Keep it simple. Just remove the baby from the breast. Try not to yell or scare him with harsh scolding if he bites. This may make him afraid to go back to the breast.



17) IS IT POSSIBLE TO LOSE WEIGHT/GAIN WEIGHT WHILE BREASTFEEDING?

Studies have shown that breastfeeding women, on average, burn about 500 more calories more per day. Therefore, most breastfeeding women do lose weight faster. Some women can actually have a hard time even maintaining a healthy weight due to such drastic weight loss. This is rare, but if you notice that you are experiencing this, just increase your daily caloric intake with healthy calories. Yet, while it is quite common for women to lose weight while breastfeeding, this is not the case for ALL women. There are some theories out there saying that breastfeeding women may have a harder time burning off simple carbohydrates. But, that is just a theory. Whether you are one of the many lucky women who see easy weight loss due to breastfeeding or not, just remember that breastfeeding is very important to the health of your baby and to YOU! If you are not seeing weight loss due to breastfeeding, do not get discouraged! Eating healthy and exercise are very good for you and your family, but stopping breastfeeding prior to the AAP recommendations is not! Your body has just spent 9 months changing while making a baby, give it some time to go back. Do not be hard on yourself and enjoy your breastfeeding, whether you are experiencing rapid weight loss or not. You will not be breastfeeding forever, but you will cherish it forever! :o) If you are concerned about your weight loss or lack there of, it wouldn't hurt to seek the advice of a professional.











I will add more as I think of them or as I get more feedback from all of you. And if you notice that any of my advice is wrong or lacking in any way, please don't hesitate to add a comment. Thank you in advance and I hope this helps to reduce some of the same questions being asked several times.

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Hope - posted on 01/16/2012

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Oh my gosh I hate it when women say it doesn't hurt! It does, but do not fear- just the first week like Shauna says. You just have to get used to it, once you do it should be no problem. I could sleep with my son nursing next to me. I could sleep sitting upright on the couch nursing! I would also like to address some other rumors about breastfeeding- like the one about it destroying your breasts. Excuse me ladies- look at victoria secret model Miranda Kerr- she is gorgeous and breastfeeds! I'm sure she's not the only one in the bunch either. Breastfeeding can also be credited to helping lose stubborn baby weight. I weighed the most I have ever weighed pregnant and lost it all plus 10 pounds off my pre-pregnancy weight. All from breastfeeding- just sitting on my butt all day and doing something awesome for my son. That is better than ANY diet I've ever heard of!

Have I convinced you yet? ;P

[deleted account]

Tess,

The first time my period came back my nipples were sore the week before. I felt similar to how you describe and I swore I was pregnant. When my period started the next week it all made sense. I would wait another week or so. If you don't get a period then take another test. It is possible to get pregnant before your first period returns. It may be a sign that you need to slow down. Maybe squeeze in a nap when baby naps or have your partner watch baby while you take a nice bath and relax. If you're still unsure you could always make a quick call to the docotr, but when I asked questions like this they always told me it was due to breastfeeding lol.

Nicole - posted on 07/26/2010

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Okay all, thank you so much for the feedback. I edited the post and added some more info. I added some more to "Why does it hurt when I breastfeed?", I added "Can I breastfeed while pregnant?", and I added a question about weight loss/weight gain to the end.

Again, I appreciate all of the feedback from you all and I hope that this thread continues to help! ;o)

~Nicole

[deleted account]

I think she'll be fine, Patrice. Babies take to solids at different ages - none of mine were really into solids until they were 12 month.They're adults now and have no issues with food.

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How old is your baby, Patrice? If she's just starting out on solids, I wouldn't worry about it at all. Starting solids is experimental, a matter of getting your baby used to new tastes and textures. Just whenever you remember is fine. She'll gradually get used to it and show that she wants more.

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Persephanie - posted on 04/02/2014

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This post was very helpful! I am so thankful for finding this site! I'm in a time of breastfeeding help.

Emma - posted on 12/04/2013

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Mothers instincts are fantastic, I wasn't sure about breastfeeding but decided I'll go with the flow and not put any pressure on myself. My son is now 5 months and exclusively bf. Yes at 1st it's tiring, it's hard work and u worry ur baby is not getting fed enough or over feeding.. But u need to remember, ur baby has never done this before and u both need to learn. I wouldn't change a thing and I love our cuddle time when he feeds. When I was pregnant the thought of bf til 6 months was daunting, now I'm sure I'll do it til he's a year x

Kufre - posted on 11/16/2013

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But am gaining seriously in breasteeding
eventho' i dont exercise. what can i do?

Emily Njoki - posted on 11/13/2013

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thanks, how can i stop my child from breastfeeding who is already 2yrs and 4months?

Brittany - posted on 07/26/2012

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I love this!
Thank you, very helpful.

My daughter is 6.5 weeks and is constantly wanting to breastfeed. (Sometimes every hour or sooner) I was hearing it is probably a growth spurt and should only last about a week? But she's been like this for a couple weeks it feels like. And my nipples are always SO sore, during the day especially.
She was 10 pounds at her monthly check up!
Is my baby just one that likes to eat?! Anyone else going thru this with there babies??

[deleted account]

I would also recommend "Adventures in Tandem Nursing" by Hilary Flower and a La Leche League group for support if you have one close by. Those two things were very helpful for me when I was nursing through my last pregnancy.

Merry - posted on 03/31/2012

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Jessica, check out kellymom.com there's a fairly large section on breastfeeding and pregnancy, tandem nursing, etc

Basically, for most women, breastfeeding is not reliable birth control, and pregnancy while breastfeeding is safe. Tandem feeding is nursing two and this is also safe for all involved.

There's exceptions of course but the majority of the time it's safe!

I'm currently tandem feeding my ten month old daughter and my almost three year old son. Its been a great experience and ill likely conceive number three this summer and while I expect my son will wean, my daughter will likely nurse through to tandem feed with the baby. :)

Margaret - posted on 01/26/2012

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Love this thread. I was worried about taking allergy medicine and breast feeding... anyways I asked my doc and he said yes that I should probably stay off the allergy meds... after my appt with him, a girlfriend of mine showed me this site where you can get an answer from a doctor. My question was on the site too! Check it out mamas. Pretty cool!



The link:

http://bit.ly/wIFZd8

Betty - posted on 01/26/2012

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Hi Nicole--Really helpful. GREAT advice. Thanks for taking the time out of your day to share! :)

Amanda - posted on 11/02/2011

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Thank you very much for the tips. And i dont plan on giving up breastfeeding. She would starve, she will not take a bottle to save her life. But I wouldn't trade it. I love the bond we have. And she is thriving so well. She is a little over 2 months old and holds her head up like a pro.

Nicole - posted on 10/31/2011

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Try the "Dangle Method" while feeding. Lie your baby on a safe surface like the middle of the bed and hang your breast over your baby by being on your hands and knees. Have the baby latch that way to use gravity to help with release the milk.

Try to latch your baby in a position in which your baby's mouth is closest to your clogged ducts. This may help to release the clogs. Combine that with gently massaging the clogs while your baby is feeding.

Apply warm compresses like warm rags to your breast where the clogs are while breastfeeding.

Whatever you do, DON'T stop nursing. Even if it hurts! The BEST THING you can do is to nurse and nurse often. If none of those things help and you start feeling flu-like symptoms and/or running a fever, call your physician right away. You may have an infection and need antibiotics. Continue nursing! It's the best thing. ;o)

Keep in mind that clogged ducts and breast infections are a sign that you may need to slow down. Take it easy. Nurse often and REST.

Hang in there and good luck.

Here is some info that may help: http://kellymom.com/bf/concerns/mom/mast...

Amanda - posted on 10/31/2011

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I really need some feedback on a question.
I am exclusively breastfeeding and my breast are sore. I pumped because I thought that I may be engorged. But i pumped till no more came out. My breast feel empty, but I still have some knots that are very sore to the touch. What should I do? Thanks for any pointers.

Amanda.

[deleted account]

Lindsey,
If it's a huge problem for you maybe have your thyroid checked? Sometimes it gets a little off after pregnancy and it can cause your to feel really tired.

Merry - posted on 09/08/2011

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I don't think breastfeeding would make you tired. It's a simple relaxing part of the day! Some women nurse child after child for years!

Lindsey - posted on 09/08/2011

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I've been breastfeeding for 21 months now. I have low energy consistenly, even though I eat well and excercise regularly and get enough sleep. What gives? Is it the lactating and hormones that are dragging me down?

Tess - posted on 02/18/2011

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I have a question and I am not sure this is the best place to put it, but I looked through several pages of threads and didn't see anything like it. I am nursing my 1 year old and for the last few weeks I have been feeling lots of...pregnancy symptoms. I took a test and it was negative. I still have not gotten my period back. Sometimes I think it could be the period looming around the corner making me feel this way. My son had horrible reflux, so he has been on cereal since about 4 1/2 months and baby food since about six or seven months. He still nurses whenever he wants though - which is a lot. But for a little bit he seemed to go off eating and just seemed to want it for a few minutes for comfort - he refused a pacifier. I just wondered if my hormones are making me feel this way due to BF. I am bloated, crampy, heartburn constantly, exhausted, sore breasts, and I just FEEL pregnant. Generally tests don't lie though and I just wondered if this is a normal feeling right before you get your period back or after you have been BFing for a long time. Sorry if this is the wrong place for my question.

Nicole - posted on 02/03/2011

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You are not weird Christan! My youngest is going to be 16 months here soon, too and we are still going strong with no signs of stopping anytime soon. I am fine with that. Congrats on your breastfeeding success thus far!

Christan - posted on 02/03/2011

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When I read what you wrote about a pump not telling you how much milk you are making that explained allot. I though I wasn't producing enough and I was going to dry up because I couldn't get much after the first pump. I did keep on producing milk though and now my little one is going to be 16 months and he is still nursing. It's good to hear people are still nursing their babies past a year. My sister is the only one I knew that nursed her baby to a year and every other mom at my VERY LARGE church has already stopped at about 3-4 months. I though I was weird nursing so long.

Nicole - posted on 02/01/2011

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Kem, this is completely normal. Many babies have their days and nights mixed up in the early weeks. For several reasons, but they all pertain to what they experienced in the whom (according to experts anyway). He probably sleeps more during the day because of the noise (which he was used to while still in your whom-it's not very quiet in there) or because he is being held a lot by others (or you) which keeps him comfortable and lulled to sleep (which is totally fine, babies need lots of contact to be secure and develop appropriately, it's just about taking steps to wake him when needed-which I will talk about below). Or it could be from a number of other things. I recommend rooming-in with him. It doesn't have to be sharing your bed, just put the bassinet, Moses basket, etc. in the your room (or share your bed, if you are comfortable and research how to do so safely). This will help you to get more rest while he transitions his days and nights and you are able to rest more. Sleep when he sleeps. I know that sounds cliche, but it's true. If you are awake ALL day and then he is awake ALL night, you are NEVER going to sleep. Then, when you are awake, wake him. Change his diaper, sponge bathe him, unwrap him, etc. to rouse him from his sleep. Then you want to nurse him. You want to do this anytime that you are awake and if it's been 2 or more hours since he last nursed. It sounds like a lot of work, but it will get better if you stick to it. Just remember that he needs to eat at least 12-16 times per day (could be more when he is going through growth spurts) within the first few weeks of his life and if he doesn't get those sessions in during the day, he WILL make up for it at night. ;o) Also, get something with some white noise (a noise machine, a fan, etc.) that can help him to be more relaxed at night. When babies are in our womb, they learn that quietness=alertness and this is why many are awake at night. They are not used to it being so quiet.

Hang in there! This is very common and it usually gets better once our babies have adjusted to this big, new world that they are not used to.

Kem - posted on 02/01/2011

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My son sleeps during the day & seems to be up all night. He is only 1 week old. Is there a way to switch that...such as how many hours a day should we try to keep him up to get him to know the difference between night & day feedings.

Floorashley - posted on 01/28/2011

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OH NO :/ i am so afriad of when my son gets teeth that he's going to bite me..

Floorashley - posted on 01/28/2011

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Great idea to put all this information in one post. I like that you included information from the (AAP) instead of just making your answers opinions makes your post seem very credible.

Juniper - posted on 01/08/2011

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Thanks for your thoughts! I really appreciate it. I do mainly breastfeed, and she definatly gets milk before food. And I know my supply is great, I have fought very hard to have a good supply. I am going to try cutting down on the meat though, I was giving her a bit with lunch and supper and I think that was just too much. If all else fails, we will go see the pediatrician. Thanks again, you are a great help!

Nicole - posted on 01/08/2011

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Well, she may have suggested the water since your daughter is eating so much solids, she may not be nursing as much and the doctor may worry that your supply isn't high enough to give her enough water. Just a thought.... Otherwise, breast milk will have enough water for your baby.

What I recommend: Cut back on the solids, cut back on the meats, only offer the solids after a breastfeeding and remember that breastfed babies should have food for fun until they are one. If you want to give extra breast milk through the sippy cup, that's fine, too. Just remember that she should get breast milk as her main food source until she is 12 months. Also, the fact that she is getting constipated may be an indication that she isn't quite ready for solids, or at least, that many solids. ;o) I hope this all helps.

Juniper - posted on 01/08/2011

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Here's my question. My daughter is breastfed, and eating solid's. But she is extreamly constipated to the point I had to take her to the doctor's last night. The nurse we dealt with told us that maybe I wasn't giving her enough water and that maybe she was having too much solids, and to try and cut down on the meat since it's so thick. My question is, doesn't she get enough water through breast milk? I have tried to give her a sippy cup but she refuses to drink the water. If I put breast milk in it, she will drink it. Do you have any suggestions or idea's why this could be happening?

Andrea - posted on 01/04/2011

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Thank you for taking the time to post all that information. Very informative.

Jennifer - posted on 12/17/2010

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Thanks so much! There was lots of helpful information, and many questions that I had were answered!

Nicole - posted on 11/28/2010

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I agree with Kathy. (Sorry it took so long to respond, I have been gone for Thanksgiving weekend.) Putting your finger in the corner of her mouth to break the suction and to stop her ability from biting down.

Also, about the nipple piercing, yes, this can create breastfeeding problems. It can damage the tissue in the nipple that allows the milk to eject. I wish women were more educated about piercings and breast augmentations before they consent to have them done. Especially if it is before they have are finished having children. You are not the only woman to have been misinformed before things like that.

[deleted account]

When you're baby is min the process of biting you, you need to get your finger in his/her mouth and break the suction.

[deleted account]

ok question, how do you stop and reposition when your child is biting you so hard your scared your going to lose your nipple! i never had a problem until recently like, just the past couple days., she has an upper tooth and she bites down hard....i cant get it out and she refuses to let go..i need to wait until shes done. She drew blood once.....what should i do.

[deleted account]

only one of my breasts produce milk! i had my other nipple pierced and no milk comes. so thats actually not a myth. i thought it was and even asked the piercer she said everything would be ok.. But it wasnt...lol I wondered why gabby prefered one breast the other and that was why.

Nicole - posted on 10/18/2010

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@Catherine
It is very common for a breastfed baby to show preference for one side versus the other. Sometimes it is due to positioning, a slow let-down or a very fast let-down, or sometimes, even size. I would recommend changing how you position her to feed from that side. Maybe laying in a different position and coming to that breast at a different angle will please her.

If it is because that side lets down slower than the other side (she would show signs of boredom or frustration if this is the case), try the breast compressions listed in the original post above to stimulate a faster let-down on that side.

If you think it is the opposite problem and that the let-down is a little too fast for her (i.e. she comes off after let-down has started, makes choking or large gulping sounds, and/or you squirt all over once she comes off) then you may want to latch her until you feel your let-down, then gently break her latch and let the it squirt into a clean cloth until it slows down and re-latch her to finish the feeding. You won't have to do this forever, just until she adjusts to the flow or your breast adjusts to her needs.

I hope this helps and good luck! Keep us updated!

If it is the size that she is not preferring, I would again recommend changing how you position her to feed on that side. This will change the way she comes to the breast and can change how she feels about it.

Catherine - posted on 10/18/2010

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Great list. But i have a problem with my three week old. She nurses just fine on one side but the other side i have a hard time getting her to latch on right.

Chloie - posted on 10/05/2010

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my son bites i just take him off n tell him no n then he doesnt bite again unless he forgets he's only done it twice but it may be because my milk is going and he wants more as im pregnant its not coming in anymore

Nicole - posted on 09/17/2010

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@Raynese
Falling asleep could be a sign of satiation, too. Is he showing signs of adequate nutrition? 6 sopping wet diapers per day? Hitting all of his milestones? Gaining weight and growing well? But, if you are concerned that he is falling asleep and not getting adequate milk, you can try breast compressions during the nursing sessions. But, if he is doing well, growing and hitting milestones, I wouldn't worry too much.

Sara - posted on 07/31/2010

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thanx for the update and to all mothers who have aproblem with which sites or organisations are quoted here i think just as u do in ur everyday life u take what u feel is beneficial and applies to u and ur situation and what u dont like just dont follow, its not a big deal just as u would google something and choose which site u like u can choose what reply u like and the ones u dont u can just ignore! lol it doesnt have to be such a big deal thanx again :)

Nicole - posted on 07/30/2010

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You didn't hit a nerve, Rachel. I must have just misunderstood your post. I thought your post was aimed at me, not the community as a whole.

The points you made about weaning are the reason we discourage debates about weaning.

Kellymom.com always backs up what is on her site with scientific evidence and studies, while still focusing on breastfeeding support. That is why I, personally, like kellymom.com. It is also the reason I use Dr. Jack Newman's information and website, too. Just personal preference, that's all. Both were easier to read (written in Layman's terms for me) than something from the AAP's site. I'm sure many other women feel the same way and that many will disagree.

In all of the training I have attended and required for my certification has revealed to me just how much kellymom's site is on par with scientific evidence and the guidelines of the International Lactation Consultant Association.

I think we just cite our favorite sites from personal preference and as long as it helps us resolve our breastfeeding problems or support us in breastfeeding, that is all that matters.

Thank you for your question.

[deleted account]

And Rachel, just a further note, I often cite the Australian Breastfeeding Association http://www.breastfeeding.asn.au/, as a reference because that's the group that was so helpful to me , and the group I was a breastfeeding counsellor with for a long time (I'm Australian) so I've seen the group grow, I've seen the development of its research and professional development arm, the Lactation Resource Centre http://www.lrc.asn.au/.



I am not as familiar with the Kellymom site, but it seems to me to have the same professionalism and links to research. Like this community, both of these organisations emphasise that the timing of weaning is a personal issue.



Thanks for asking this question, Rachel. It's given us a chance to talk a bit about our favourite breastfeeding sites and to explain that both are professional, evidence-based organisations.

[deleted account]

Rachael, you didn't hit a nerve. I was just trying to explain why I think kellymom is used so much (it's a great BF site) and why this group goes by the WHO. We are aware of the judgements when it comes to weaning which is why we (the moderators and myself) are trying to discourage weaning debates.

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