FYI for all those who have questions re: length of time to BF

Tara - posted on 06/28/2010 ( 39 moms have responded )

2,567

14

107

This is from the WHO website (world health organization)

"Breastfeeding is an unequalled way of providing ideal food for the healthy growth and development of infants; it is also an integral part of the reproductive process with important implications for the health of mothers. As a global public health recommendation, infants should be exclusively breastfed(1) for the first six months of life to achieve optimal growth, development and health(2). Thereafter, to meet their evolving nutritional requirements, infants should receive nutritionally adequate and safe complementary foods while breastfeeding continues for up to two years of age or beyond. Exclusive breastfeeding from birth is possible except for a few medical conditions, and unrestricted exclusive breastfeeding results in ample milk production."

Pretty much says it all. Nursing up to and beyond the 2nd year of life is recommended. It is still nutritionally superior to cows milk and formula. Can't fake mother nature no matter how hard formula companies try.
:)Tara

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Nicole - posted on 06/28/2010

1,117

27

47

Actually, I have over 5 years of counseling women with breastfeeding and I am a Certified Lactation Counselor and Lactation Educator and it IS beneficial to breastfeed 2+ years!!!



First, the theory that breastfeeding beyond a certain age providing no nutritional value is faulty. Breast milk is a living substance that ALWAYS has immunological benefits and antibodies. Something that you will NEVER get from pasteurized milk from another species!



Second, studies have shown that certain immunological properties are higher in the 2+ year old breast milk!



Third, every year that a woman breastfeeds, she further reduces her chance of breast cancer and osteoporosis.



Also, I HATE when people claim that the WHO recommendations do not apply to America or any other industrialized country! The WHO guidelines say NOTHING about it only applying to certain children! And, by the way, have you seen what an average American toddler/child eats? Have you seen how many American children are overweight, suffering from diabetes and other health problems that children of non-industrialized countries NEVER suffer from? If you ask me, people should be arguing that children of industrialized countries be breastfed LONGER, not shorter. It seems like those children need it more!



I think we should be supporting ALL breastfeeding women and not making them feel embarrassed about how long they breastfeed. That is their decision to make and no one else's.

Olivia - posted on 06/28/2010

41

0

26

It doesn't matter who the WHO is targeting. read up on Dr. Sears. He is targeting America women and i am sure his books are translated for Europe and else where. He has 7 children and is also a pedi along with his kids and his wife, they believe in attachment parenting and say the same as the WHO.



1 yr isn't long enough if you are breast feeding if you can and want to breast milk is always best and the bond between you and the child last a lifetime. After 1 you don't breast feed but 2-4 times a day maybe more depending on your child.



Nutrition wise it is the best for the baby along with the correct solid foods but stopping at 1 yr for formula maybe but not breastfeeding.



Sorry if I sound frantic, I thought it was so nice for Tara to post this, then someone to go and comment on it recommending 1 yr.



I understand some people can only go one yr, some can't even produce milk that long, but if your milk is still going it is ALWAYS best to breast feed longer for your child. develops good brain tissue and nerves.



The best time to stop is when your child is ready, starts to turn away from the breast so on. Until then don't take it away unless it is medically necessary or you just can't produce any more milk.

Shayna - posted on 06/28/2010

89

0

6

I am not claiming to be an expert on BFing, but just wanted to point out that WHO's recommendation is targeted towards under-developed countries, bc children there don't get a lot of good nutrients from regular food.
AAP recommend to BFing until 1 yr old.
I am not saying that doing it until the age of 2 is bad, but might not be that necessarily if a child is eating healthy and nutritious meals.
The consistency of breast milk becomes quite different by that point.

Mandy - posted on 06/30/2010

233

16

8

The WHO is NOT targetting the under-developed countries, it would not be call the WORLD health organisation then. Breastfeeding should continue as long as both mother and baby are happy continue. Breastmilk continues to be beneficial for the whole time nursing continues, it doesn't suddenly become worthless because a child hits a magical age.
No matter what country we live in - America, The UK, Europe, Australia, Africa or even the moon, breastfeeding is the best for all babies.

[deleted account]

Some people seem to have a lot of time on their hands.

I don't provide links to anything cuz I don't have them and I do encourage to nurse past a year, but I think I've also been pretty vocal (for the most part) that I follow a 'your kid, your business' philosophy. I just don't appreciate the posts telling me that nursing my 2 year old is wrong, inappropriate, gross, or any of the other negative adjectives that I read when I'm on a BREASTFEEDING board... Debate boards or others.. yeah, sure, but not on one that is supposed to be supportive of breastfeeding.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

39 Comments

View replies by

Pauline - posted on 07/01/2010

19

0

1

It's so sad that people equate the nutrients on cow milk to those in breast milk. They aren't even comparable. Human milk is tailor made for people. Cow milk is designed for cows. The composition is different. The needs that a toddler has are different than those of a cow. We are the only animals on the planet who drink the milk of another species. But I digress.

My toddlers have never had cow's milk and probably won't for a while to come. The WHOs recommendations are for the world as a whole. Those in impoverished countries should shoot for longer than the two year minimum. Those are the countries who drive the world wide average for weaning up to 4 years and beyond.

I'm planning to nurse my little ones until they are ready to be done nursing. I'm tandem nursing my 3.5 and 1.5 year old and have no plans to stop nursing either of them any time soon...unless one of them surprises me.

Allison - posted on 07/01/2010

433

51

38

Personally, based on my experience with my son and other family members, the WHO recommendation (2 years) seem much more valid than the AAP (1 year). There is NO way my son was ready to wean at 1 year, or eating enough other nutrition. ALL of my friends and family who weaned their children between 6 months and 2 years had a serious "battle" lasting weeks or months, but they all felt it necessary to do for some reason or another. For my son, not ONE tear was shed - we both were really ready and it was SUCH a natural, healthy transition. And I have to comment that he is a VERY confident independent 3 year old now. Also, prior to age 2 he was still really vulnerable to getting sick b/c of putting dirty toys, hands etc, in his mouth, and breastmilk is the only food that provides living cells with antibodies attached! And those antibodies were for the specific illnesses HE was exposed to, since they came directly from my body. Not to mention he was still very emotionally vulnerable prior to age 2, and so if we were in new places or stressful situations (airplane rides, noisy malls, potty training, etc), our nursing relationship was a HUGE help in making him comfortable and confident. We went to age 2.5, then I gently encouraged him to wean b/c it seemed that it was no longer helping his emotional development, wasn't as comforting as before, he no longer put random objects in his mouth, had learned to wash his hands, and he was eating LOTS of other healthy foods. I had never been around someone who had nursed so long, and I was AMAZED at how easy weaning was at that age.



From what I have read (and experienced with my family, again) cows milk can have real negative effects on kids under age 2 or 3, including constipation, reflux and irritability. As someone else commented, I've read that it is because it's really high in salts and proteins designed to grow a 600 lb calf - not designed for humans at all. Human milk is engineered to grow human kids, no matter the age, but kids grow the MOST until age 1.5 - 2, so I would argue that they really do NEED that human milk until at least that age. Cows milk is really not very good substitute, from what I have read. But that is my own hypothesis - I am a chemistry "doctor" and bioengineer, but not a medical doctor :) However, our pediatrician did say at age 2 that as long as he was nursing and getting extra calcium from green plants, and a little cheese and yogurt (which he loved) he did NOT actually NEED any cows milk. Now at age 3 he drinks cow milk because likes it - but he has never been constipated once in his whole life, compared to my friend's and family's kids who ALL started getting (painful) constipation (a LOT!) when they started cow milk or cow milk formula between age 2 months and 2 years.



I would also concur that the pesticides, hormones and antibiotics found in cows milk can be especially harmful to growing kids. A recent Pediatrics study showed the distinct harm done to kids from pesticides in their foods. Milk, having a high fat content, serves as a repository of fat-soluble toxins accumulated over the lifetime of an animal. (That said, I also made sure I limited my chemical/pesticide exposure during (and before) nursing by eating organic foods, not buying or using chemicals at home, and always protecting myself in the lab.) Anyway, just some more food for thought :)

Rebecca - posted on 06/30/2010

77

15

28

Thanks Tara for posting this. As a breastfeeding mum of a 15 month old I often feel judged but am doing what I know is best for my little girl and me. I think others imposing artificial time lines on such a wonderful experience between mum and bub is really hard to deal with at times.

Kirsten Veronica - posted on 06/30/2010

71

12

0

This topic is so near and dear to my heart and it still surprises me how passionate I can get about it. I will try to restrain myself. ;)

My darling daughter is over 10.5 months old and probably 95% breast fed. I only started introducing solids at about 9.5 months and started with fresh avocado and organic sweet potatoes I baked. No formula, no jarred baby food. I occasionally give her ice in a sippy cup so she can sip the melted ice water. This is *my* mothering/feeding method and I'm thrilled with my healthy, happy, thriving wildflower of a child. She is my first and only baby and I will breast feed as long as possible. In an ideal world, I would definitely prefer for that to be 3.5-4 years. Even though she will be receiving more and more nutrition from solid food as she grows, nothing *not a thing* can replace the benefits of the antibodies and nurturing of breast feeding. And I do not want her to be part of the statistic in this country (USA) that our children are the first generation with a shorter life expectancy than their parents due to food related illnesses; obesity, diabetes, heart disease... Starting with the best food for a baby, breast milk, and slowly introducing whole, healthy foods as she is ready, is the best way I can do my part to help her avoid those illnesses if I can.

So how long you breast feed is obviously up to you, but I hope that we can change the prevailing attitudes in this country about how to help our children to be healthy and about our own bodies as mothers and what they are *meant* to do. Our breasts exist to nourish and nurture our babies for as long as our babies need that nurturing. I truly wish that our entire society would support that completely.

Nicole - posted on 06/30/2010

1,117

27

47

Laura said all that I would want to say. And promom's site is perfect!

Elizabeth, I did not breastfeed my oldest for very long. So, I know much about formula feeding and how time consuming and difficult it is. I have went on to breastfeed 3 more children very successfully. I am still currently breastfeeding baby number 4 and we are 8 months and counting! Breastfeeding is far less time consuming and far less hassle to me.

How long you choose to breastfeed is your choice, but most mothers who have done both will tell you that breastfeeding (in the long run) is easier. It can be difficult in the beginning, but if you hang in there for just a few weeks, it gets much easier! And well worth it!

Celeste - posted on 06/30/2010

3,046

30

870

Elizabeth, I think your concerns are a very common one. I'd take it day by day. You might surprised and change how you feel! I know it's hard to think about right now, but I'd just give it time. I know for me, I never thought I'd nurse as long as I did. My feelings about breastfeeding changed as time went on.

Merry - posted on 06/30/2010

9,274

169

248

Elizabeth, breastfeeding actually allows for less time spent feeding the baby amd more sleep for the mom.
think about having to go into the kitchen and put the formula together and heat it up and then feed it to your baby. then think that formula fed babies have more poop waste because it isnt all being digested like breastmilk. then think about at night when you would have to go into the kitchen and turn on lights and put formula together and warm it up and then feed your baby, all the while baby is crying for food.
then also consider that formula fed babies get sick more often on average and so you could be taking your baby into more dr visits. then id consider the money! well formula is a ton of money and there is bottles nipples coolers for trips and cleaning it all. your body is free milk perfect temperature and always available. If you formula feed there is significant health risks. babies are at a higher risk of getting ear infections and viruses. Your milk gives baby immunity to many many germs and as your skin senses more germs around it automatically puts the anitbodies into the milk for baby! at first baby will nurse for 3-min or more at a feeding but as baby grows the time will be less, sometimes only 5-10 minutes for a nurse. and it is hard to get used to breastfeeding but around the 4th wek it starts getting easy. by the 6th week it will still be getting easier and by 6 months it is so simple! now as Eric is 15months breastfeeding is pure joy to me. I Love it! it is so peaceful and comforting and i love sharing my love with him by feeding him. Dont feel you havve to breastfeed but remember that formula is the 4th choice for health reasons. 1st is breastfed by mom 2nd is bottle fed moms milk 3rd is bottle fed doner milk and 4th best is artificial milk.
heres a link to a great article forming the 101 reasons to breastfeed
http://www.promom.org/101/
it really has great info and i learned alot i didnt know before, check it out! and remember that breastfeeding is the way your baby is supposed to eat, there are options if you can not give baby your milk but it will never be the same.
1,2,3 years seems like alot but when your child is 16 or 30 you will think that those precious years went by too fast and i bet you will wish you enjoyed them more. I wish i had enjoyed Erics first few months more.
Best of luck to you and have a blast being a mom, it IS a wonderful experience!
Laura

Elizabeth - posted on 06/30/2010

29

14

1

i would like to say as a woman who don't know who the WHO is(will have to read up on it) and is not sure whether or not to breastfeed longer then six weeks, i wouldn't want to be pressured into continuing something i know i will get tired of doing or have little time to do in the beginning anyway. What about the mothers who have young children to get up while trying to breastfeed the new born or who has a problem with sharing their body in general? I know breast milk is better then any substitute but i myself have little patience to sit down long enough and yes this is my first child and want to experience all that i can but trying to breastfeed the recommended time is not something i feel i can do

[deleted account]

Shayna Stanton,

the emotional stability of a child is based on the relationship he/she has with a mother why cut it after one year or two.. if a child is eating lots of solids great woopty doo but they will not have the relationship extended like they should have

also formula is pushed on mothers in poor countries and is a main killer because the water isnt clean! heelloo its for all mothers everywhere. you are an exception because you live in a wealthy country and can feed your 1 year old grapes every day

Rachel - posted on 06/29/2010

218

1

10

wow!!! In my opinion I think that its up to the mom...2 years is optimal but its not the worse thing to stop after a year. its better than only going for a couple weeks like most women do. another thing I wouldnt take anything to heart what the aap says. Look at our country. everyone is on medication for something, everyone is suffering from some type of health issue. My pediatrician reccomended formula the 2nd week and it almost destroyed all chances of ever getting a proper latch again. it took 2 months to get him to latch after that nonsense. I think that we SHOULD look at the health crisis in our country before taking the advice of people that got us here to begin with. I'm not saying all health care proffesionals are intending any harm or malice towards the communities, but, tell me why you walk into a DRS office and come out with a fistful of prescriptions that just end up causing more problems later. I just think there is a reason why so many diseases haven't been cured. because there is no profit in a cure. only in treatment. I am convinced, that they want us to fail. Its all about money.



on another note...europeans breastfeed for an extended period of time...and not all of europe is under-developed. same goes for alot of industrialized counties. sorry for ranting...but I feel like people should look at the big picture.

Nicole - posted on 06/29/2010

1,117

27

47

"At least" was a poor interpretation. I think it's because I interpret "up to" to mean "breastfeed until or beyond". But, that is my *personal* goal, whatever your goal, that is up to you (and I mean *you* in general terms). My intention all along was only to make women feel comfortable with extended breastfeeding, if they wanted to or practiced it and I wanted them to know that it is healthy and okay.

[deleted account]

Recommendations from the WHO and the AAP both say the nursing relationship should continue as long as both mom and baby desire. It doesn't matter if that's 12 months or 3 years. Breast milk will not become void of nutrition at a certain age and children will be ok if mom chooses to wean at one. Please read this thread: http://www.circleofmoms.com/breastfeedin...

If we're all supportive of a mom choosing how long she nurses then their shouldn't be any negativity :)

Merry - posted on 06/29/2010

9,274

169

248

wow that was quite an adventure to read all that but unlike normal i feel i only have to say that my son is over 1 year and if i were to stop breastfeeding him he would quickly become malnourished as he rarely eats "regular" food and doesnt drink "regular" milk. he eats and drinks actual regular milk made by me :)
And if he feel like nursing until he is 6 then I will be proud to do so.

Karla - posted on 06/29/2010

224

5

17

I think this particular thread just rubbed me the wrong way because I get tired of the WHO recommendations being misrepresented. There is a difference between "up to two years" and "at least two years".

I fully support the decision to nurse your child as long as you both want. But I do see lots of negativity from both sides.

Celeste - posted on 06/29/2010

3,046

30

870

I'm sorry that you feel that way. It wasn't at all my intention to be judgmental.

Again, the reason why I didn't post weaning techniques is because she didn't sound like she wanted to wean. Perhaps I should've posted them, but at the time, I felt that it wasn't warranted. It wasn't to be judgmental, it was to encourage her that it's ok to nurse past one because I've been there. I know what it's like to not have that support. *I* wanted to support her.

Karla - posted on 06/29/2010

224

5

17

I feel your posts are judgmental because when another mom asks "How do you wein from breastfeeding...", you simply post a link on extended BF'ing.

I recognize the mother in the other thread was not certain about weaning, but above you stated "I'll still provide them the link for weaning techniques".........and that is not what you did.

Celeste - posted on 06/29/2010

3,046

30

870

Karla, the reason why I didn't post the weaning links as stated above is because she sounded like she did NOT want to wean. She sounded like she wasn't sure and neither of them were ready to wean, which is why I didn't give her the link. If she posted back saying that she was 100% sure she wanted to wean, I'd be more than happy to post those techniques.



Just curious, how in the world is my above post that you cut and pasted judgmental? Perhaps if you were to look back at my previous posts and see that I *HAVE* posted weaning techniques.



The point of this whole post is to encourage and share information about nursing past one. If you do not want to nurse past one, then don't. I will continue to share my knowledge and experience.

Karla - posted on 06/29/2010

224

5

17

Nicole and Celeste, I would appreciate it if you would respond to weaning questions as you say above....BUT YOU DO NOT!!!!



In one thread Nicole posted "The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends AT LEAST TWO YEARS or longer if both mother and baby are comfortable"...NOT TRUE....the WHO recommends "UP TO TWO YEARS OF AGE OR BEYOND". There is quite a difference between "AT LEAST" and "UP TO".



In another thread Celeste answered a mom's question of how to wean her one year old by posting...."You don't *have* to wean if you don't want to. There are lots of benefits to nursing past a year! I know it's hard when you aren't supported but for me, knowledge is power. That knowledge gives me the confidence in my decision to keep going.



So, my opinion is to keep going! It sounds like neither of you are ready.



Read this:

http://www.kellymom.com/bf/bfextended/eb..."



Now, I do recognize that this mom was not certain about weaning, but you previously stated that you "still provide them the link for weaning techniques". This is not a link to kellymom of how to wean, but a link to kellymom on extended bf'ing.



Now ladies, please stop acting like the victims of a (quoting Nicole) "lot of judgment about other women's breastfeeding durations". You are quite honestly dispensing quite a bit of your own judgements!!!!

Nicole - posted on 06/29/2010

1,117

27

47

I have to fully agree with Celeste! This is why I mention that it is okay to breastfeed beyond one.

I, too, thought you HAD to wean at one with my second child and at 12 months, I started the weaning process, 3 months of torture and sleeplessness, feelings of failure, exhaustion, guilt (after my son would just cry and frantically rub his head in my chest at bed time), and frustration with all the other conforting techniques I was trying to use, I could FINALLY say he was weaned! Then when at church one Sunday, my husband's cousin was talking about still nursing her twins whom were born 1 month before my son, I was pissed that no one had told me it was okay to continue nursing! I was pretty ticked that all of the medical professionals made me feel like breast milk provided no benefits beyond 12 months! I realized that those 3 months of frustration and exhaustion that I put my son and myself through could have been avoided.

If a mother wants to wean at one year, I am fine with that! But if there is a mother who is on the fence and is weaning because she thinks she HAS to wean, I want her to know that there are still benefits to breastfeeding beyond 12 months. Even in industrialized countries. I'm not trying to talk her into something she doesn't want to do, I am just trying to make sure that is what she truly wants.

Celeste - posted on 06/29/2010

3,046

30

870

I think as a breastfeeding group, we need to stay away from terms like "creepy" and "gross". If you don't want to nurse past one, then don't. We're here to support moms whatever her long term goals are.



Karla, the reason why I'll mention that it's ok to go beyond one, is that many moms don't know it's ok and beneficial to go beyond one. I know for me, I was one of them. I had no idea that it was ok to go beyond one. So, this is why I'll mention going past one. But, I'll still provide them the link for weaning techniques. In fact, a friend of mine weaned all her babies at a year. She saw me nursing my twin boys past a year and mentioned that she wished she would've known it was ok. She thought she *had* wean then.

Shayna - posted on 06/29/2010

89

0

6

Nicole,
I can understand you getting emotional about topic that seem so close to your heart.
My point was that when WHO recommends 2 yrs, it takes into account all the countries where children don't get proper nutrition and therefore, it is very beneficial for them to be on breast milk longer.
In US, fortunately, that's not the case, and AAP, taking that into consideration, has a different standard - 1 yr.
Therefore, I think it's misleading to keep telling women that 2 yrs is a minimum recommended and they should all strive for that. If they choose to do it - great, but if not, and they want to stop after 1 yr, they already gave their child a wonderful gift.

Speaking of cow's milk - there is very little benefit to it actually. And giving non-organic milk might actually be somewhat harmful due to all the antibiotics and hormones that are given to cows. There are many many ways to ensure that children get enough calcium without giving them a lot of cow's milk. But that's a whole other topic :)

Karla - posted on 06/29/2010

224

5

17

It pains me when I see a mom post that she wants advice on how to wean her 1 year old and she is hammered with question like "Why so early?" or posts questioning whether or not she knows about WHO's reccommendations. Why can't we just give advice to help each other and keep our opions to ourselves unless someone wants them. Both sides of this discussion are guilty of this offense:)

Angie - posted on 06/29/2010

373

7

49

It always kind of baffles me when I hear someone say that a baby can have "regular milk" after a year. I can't for the life of me figure out why breastmilk from a human that is perfectly designed for that baby/toddler is somehow gross but breastmilk from a cow that is perfectly designed for a baby calf who will weigh 600 lbs by the end of it's first year is somehow not gross.

Like someone else said breastmilk doesn't suddenly become kool aid after a year. No matter how old your child is it is perfectly tailored to their needs. Also in studies on breastmilk it is found that the breastmilk we produce at 1 year is almost identical to the milk we produce for our newborn babies meaning a 1 year old still needs that breastmilk with the high level of antibodies and high fat content for their growing brains.

Now I'll crawl down off my soap box and go nurse my 3 1/2 year old!

Olivia - posted on 06/28/2010

41

0

26

I just want to state that I am supporting all Bfing woman out there

YOU GO GIRLS!!!!

Also if anyone happen to miss this on my previous post "The best time to stop is when your child is ready," whatever that age may be.

Nicole - posted on 06/28/2010

1,117

27

47

So true Karla! I just want any mother to make their breastfeeding goals, whatever length that may be! Just because someone doesn't extend breastfeed, doesn't make them a bad breastfeeding mother. It just means that they had different goals or life circumstances that created things that way and that if perfectly fine, as well. Again, we should all be supporting each other!

Karla - posted on 06/28/2010

224

5

17

Also, this being a breastfeeding support group, I would hate for any BF'ing mom who chooses to wean her child at any time before toddlerhood to read many of the threads commented on by moms who choose to Bf longer. We ALL need to be more respectful of others!!!

[deleted account]

Just piping in to say that my mom breastfed my brother til he was 2.5. I weaned myself at around the same age. I'm still nursing my son who turned 2 at the end of March. It is in no way weird or whatever.

When I was nursing my twins I DID think it was weird to not wean by 18 months at the latest, but I was definitely wrong. :)

Karla - posted on 06/28/2010

224

5

17

It seems to me that many moms in this community read "up to two years of age or beyond", and take that to mean "AT LEAST two years of age or beyond".

Nicole - posted on 06/28/2010

1,117

27

47

Oh, I'm sorry if I come off as emotional. I just felt there was a lot of judgment about other women's breastfeeding durations combined with ignorance about the benefits of longer breastfeeding durations. So, I thought I would share my training and education about breastfeeding and breastfeeding durations.

Now, where I might have been a little saddened is that this is a breastfeeding support group and to see so many breastfeeding mothers (on a breastfeeding support group, nonetheless) disregard the benefits of breast milk (at any age), was quite disheartening. I would hope that no mother who is currently breastfeeding a toddler, especially one breastfeeding a 2+ year old toddler, ever sees this thread and sees how judgmental other breastfeeding mothers are being about their breastfeeding! As a breastfeeding advocate and someone educated in the psychological impacts on breastfeeding mothers, I know that would make them feel sad and lonely. Like they are alone in this!

Well, to those of you who are extended breastfeeding: Please know that you are not alone! I am currently breastfeeding my fourth child and my goal is to breastfeed for AT LEAST two years and however long AFTER 2 years that he chooses. I know that he AND I will benefit! And it will be worth it!

Ella - posted on 06/28/2010

129

23

17

And to add to what Nicole said- they saliva of the baby/toddler/child tells the Mothers body DAILY what it needs. Meaning- the milk changes for that day to be what the child needs! Pretty amazing! and TY Nicole!

Shayna - posted on 06/28/2010

89

0

6

Nicole,
I was going to post a reply to you, but then realized that you either didn't read my posts or just didn't understand them.
You seem to be very emotional and I don't debate/discuss with emotions since it is usually completely useless.

Shayna - posted on 06/28/2010

89

0

6

Olivia,
First off, you can ALWAYS find someone, somewhere, with "some" research to support any argument you want. BFing is no different, so I don't need to read up on Dr. Sears or any other doctor.
By the time the child is 1 yrs old, he is able to eat all and any food and receive all the vitamins and nutrients through that. Emotional side aside, the benefits to BFing are not that significant. Obviously, breast milk doesn't all of a sudden turns into a Kool Aid and is not determental whatsoever, but there is a big difference between saying "it's good" vs saying "it's not bad".
I don't care how long women breastfeed, but I think it's very misleading to say that it's recommended to do it for 2 yrs, unless child has no other way to get all the nutrition that he needs.

Mary - posted on 06/28/2010

88

43

17

Just a clarification, I think all moms have to do what's best, but the following is from the American Academy of Pediatrics:

How long should I breastfeed my baby?

The AAP recommends that babies be exclusively breastfed for about the first 6 months of life. This means your baby needs no additional foods (except Vitamin D) or fluids unless medically indicated. Babies should continue to breastfeed for a year and for as long as is mutually desired by the mother and baby. Breastfeeding should be supported by your physician for as long as it is the right choice for you and your baby.

I think the key is, as long as is mutually desired. Everyone must decide that for herself.

Kerri - posted on 06/28/2010

71

19

0

shayna I am with you there. Beyond 2 years it does not provide any extra nutritional benefits to toddler that normal milk will not do provided a healthy diet is met. To be honest the idea of BF beyond that age sits uncomfortable with me but everyone has different opinons on what is 'right' for them. My son will be three in two weeks and the thought of bf him at his age would creep me out. Having said that my daughter is 6 months old and after talling my mum I am aiming to bf for at least a year, she was kind of !!!!! I think this was more to do with the idea of teeth since she gave up bf me and my sister when we had teeth- she became very sore when we clamped down. She is like me though the idea of doing that with an older child sits uncomfortable due to how big they are and to me seems a bit like babying them. I don't give my son a bottle so why would I give someone his age a breast, when it's more of a comfort thing. This is nothing compared to some 8 year olds etc which are still breastfed, that i will never undrstand.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms