has anyone else been kick out or asked to leave??

TeBeth - posted on 10/22/2010 ( 131 moms have responded )

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i mean what the hell people!? ive never been more pissed off in my life. it makes me sick when ppl try and come up to me in logans, pen station, longhorn, the eastland mall, or walmart and tell me to stop breastfeeding my child, take it to the bathroom or leave. piss off! thats my usual response. i know my rights. indiana state law protects my right to feed my child anywhere i want. you wouldnt like sitting on the floor next to a toilet to eat dinner, so why should my baby have to!! its not like im trying to play "peek-a-boob" with the guy at the next table. im just trying to nourish my hungry child. and so what if she's 7 months old? its best to strictly breastfeed for the first year anyways. i dont care what society thinks. laleche, lactation consultants, and research has proven its the best thing. so what i really want to know is if there are any other mothers who have had to "tell off" establishments and other individuals who have approached you in public asking you to stop breastfeeding your child.

SOURCE: IC 16-35-6; (03)HE1510.1.1. --> SECTION 1. IC 16-35-6 IS ADDED TO THE INDIANA CODE AS A NEW CHAPTER TO READ AS FOLLOWS [EFFECTIVE JULY 1, 2003]:
Chapter 6. Breastfeeding
Sec. 1. Notwithstanding any other law, a woman may breastfeed her child anywhere the woman has a right to be.

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Merry - posted on 10/31/2010

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Massachusetts: "A mother may breastfeed her child in any public place or establishment or place which is open to and accepts or solicits the patronage of the general public and where the mother and her child may otherwise lawfully be present. Notwithstanding any general or special law to the contrary, the act of a mother breastfeeding her child, and any exposure of a breast incidental thereto that is solely for the purpose of nursing such child, shall not be considered lewd, indecent, immoral, or unlawful conduct. No person or entity, including a governmental entity, shall... restrict, harass or penalize a mother who is breastfeeding her child."

Michigan: "A mother's breastfeeding of her baby does not under any circumstances constitute nudity irrespective of whether or not the nipple is covered during or incidental to the feeding."

Minnesota: "A mother may breast-feed in any location, public or private, where the mother and child are otherwise authorized to be, irrespective of whether the nipple of the mother's breast is uncovered during or incidental to the breast-feeding."

Mississippi: "A mother may breast-feed her child in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be, without respect to whether the mother's breast or any part of it is covered during or incidental to the breast-feeding."

Missouri: "Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, a mother may, with as much discretion as possible, breast-feed her child in any public or private location where the mother is otherwise authorized to be."

Montana: "A mother has a right to breastfeed the mother's child in any location, public or private, where the mother and child are otherwise authorized to be present, irrespective of whether or not the mother's breast is covered during or incidental to the breastfeeding."

Nebraska: No public breastfeeding laws.

Nevada: "Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a mother may breast feed her child in any public or private location where the mother is otherwise authorized to be, irrespective of whether the nipple of the mother's breast is uncovered during or incidental to the breast feeding."

New Hampshire: "Breast-feeding a child does not constitute an act of indecent exposure and to restrict or limit the right of a mother to breast-feed her child is discriminatory."

New Jersey: "Notwithstanding any provision of law to the contrary, a mother shall be entitled to breastfeed her baby in any location of a place of public accommodation, resort or amusement wherein the mother is otherwise permitted."

Rachel - posted on 10/31/2010

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Also, Kathy, i must disagree with you- in that this certainly IS an issue about basic human rights. In the USA only ONE IN TEN babies is getting any mama milk at age 6 months. to me, it seems to be the right of all babies to have that food which is the most perfect- made for them, which no formula comes even a close second to proper development of their bodies and brains- and since the #s (in this country anyway) are SO LOW, its most important for people to know that this is a basic right of babies and mothers. It goes to the deeper issue that we dont value children and mothers in our culture. perhaps this is very different where you live in australia. Here in the US we spend lots of time twirling pink ribbons around and not dealing with the deeper issues.

Claire - posted on 08/13/2012

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You should tell them off. The only thing you might do differently is get a cover up or use a blanket. Some people do get uncomfortable seeing it. I always used a cover up because I was uncomfortable with the thought of people seeing my boobs. LOL. But thats the only thing I can think of

Vanessa - posted on 11/07/2010

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Honestly, if they asked me to move, I'd ask them if they were aware they were breaking a law by asking me to leave. I would not get up and move to feed my baby anywhere else when i have a legal RIGHT to FEED my baby. I would say it just like that too, because it isn't about "breastfeeding" and my right to do that, it's simply about my baby's right to eat, regardless of what I'm choosing to feed him/her. If it was someone who works there, I'd finish feeding my child then go to management and suggest they properly train their employees on current state laws and breastfeeding.

Thankfully i haven't run into this too much here (Ontario, Canada) I am as discreet as possible, but don't use the blanket over the baby's head (i wrap it around their body & neck, so all you see is their head and my shirt is covering my boob, because there's perverts out there o.O) Though, that's getting harder the older she gets (22 months old) even though she's almost two, if my daughter wanted to nurse, we nurse. If anyone has issues with that, they can turn around and not look. It's pretty simple.

Anna - posted on 10/29/2010

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I'm sorry, I don't care if you whipped out your entire boob and fed your baby in public. I don't think it has anything to do with modesty or lack thereof. I don't care if it makes people uncomfortable. I don't care if its in the middle of a busy restaurant. I think that as long as you are comfortable you should be proud to nurse ANYWHERE. Nursing needs to be SEEN in this Formula company brainwashed society. And if you get asked to leave. DON'T. Call on the la leche league folks and ask people to have a nurse in. If nourishing your infant/child as needed in the way that you choose isn't the most basic human right, I don't know what is.

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131 Comments

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Sj - posted on 08/11/2012

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not in so many words. i got a hooter hider tho, so that might be why. i do find it interesting how many people want to peak under the cover while my babe is eating tho. thats annoying.

Sally - posted on 08/11/2012

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I nursed my now 8 year old to 3 1/2 and my almost 3 year old is still going strong. The only public restriction I ever gave either girl is that once they no longer need it for nutrition (about 1 1/2 to 2 years), we don't nurse outside in winter anymore. I've always thought covering was tacky like you were ashamed of it and why should my baby eat under a blanket if no one else has to. I've even nursed in a sling or Moby while grocery shopping. Most people at church just assume my daughter is napping when she's really having a snack
The only person who ever came close to complaining was my father in law. He politely informed me that it made him uncomfortable to see it so at his house I leave the room to nurse and at my house he leaves the room while we do it. All of my public comments have been old people telling me how great I am to give my children what they need regardless of what might be popular. I don't know if it's where I live or my attitude, but even if any one did tell me to stop or leave, I'd tell them to get bent.

Michael - posted on 08/09/2012

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I find it amazing the attitudes and comments I have seen on this topic. It appears the main issue that these women are angry about is because the restaurants and patrons don't recognize and/or accept that they are 'the center of attention'. It obviously has less to do with breast feeding and more to do with these women's childish need for attention.

If this is not the case then why would there ever be an issue? My mom, wife and sisters ALL breast feed their children...and many times in public. And probably in only 5% of the time did anyone around them even know they were breast feeding. Why?...because they are polite and decent people that understood when in public everyone should conduct themselves in a courteous manner demonstrating basic civility and manners. How?...they would use a small blanket to cover the child and their breast...sometimes my Mom if she had forgotten the baby blanket would ask the waiter for a clean cloth napkin to use instead.

My message to these women...try focusing on acquiring a basic understanding of manners and civility and less on being the 'center of attention'.

Vanessa - posted on 11/07/2010

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@Jennifer (shusterman)
Hopefully you complained about the store owner to someone? That's ridiculous! :(

Kimberly - posted on 11/05/2010

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I've never had this problem, but my response would be if my breastfeeding my child bothers you than you're staring too hard!

Chanda - posted on 11/05/2010

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Thank goodness I've never been asked to leave or cover up! I do try to be discreet- but there are times when baby pops off and something may show! Big deal- if they're starting that hard to get a peep then so be it! I have extended nursed all of my 3 children until way past 2 years old. My current nursling will be 4 in January. Trust your instincts and do what's best for YOUR child. I dare someone to kick me out of an establishment- they'll see a lawsuit on their hands for doing so! :o) That's my 2 cents!

Justyna - posted on 11/05/2010

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U go girl!!! Don't ever let human ignorance and stupidity get to you! Be the bigger person, smile and keep doing what you are doing. My daughter is 14 months and I am still b.feeding her. I LOVE IT, and SHE LOVES IT, and I do it WHEN SHE WANTS IT! and if someone does not like it, don't look!
Keep up the good work!

Merry - posted on 11/05/2010

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Jennifer those are two horror stories! I hope you don't let those experiences affect where you breastfeed. Unfortunately many moms would just not nurse in public after something like that, I hope you keep it up and stay confideNt!

Jennifer - posted on 11/04/2010

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Even though I always cover up when breastfeeding in public (and I haven't actually done so very often with my now 12mo) I've been asked twice to LEAVE.



The first time happened in a local seafood restaurant when my daughter was 2 months old. I was sitting in the corner booth on the inside with my husband beside me to the outside and friends across from us. I was out of sight of almost everyone in the restaurant yet a couple still complained, and the restaurant owner asked me to finish feeding her in the car or leave. I stated that I had the right in SC to BF anywhere in public or private that I was authorized to be, and the FEMALE owner told me she was kicking me out of her restaurant because I was no longer authorized to be there.



The second time I was breastfeeding my daughter in our car in a parking lot of a gas station when she was 8mo. I had taken her out of her car seat to bf while Hubby was in the store, and a man walking by our car stopped and berated me for not having my child in her car seat. I explained we were parked for me to feed her, and I would be returning her to her car seat as soon as she was done eating...before we left. He headed inside the store, and a few minutes later one of the store clerks came out and told me I wasn't allowed to feed her in their parking lot and had to leave. I mean come on I was in the freakin' parking lot in the privacy of my own car and someone still complained! I stated the SC law, and thankfully that clerk left it at that and walked away.



It really pisses me off that people have such a problem with BFing in public. My child will eat when she's hungry, and I'm not going to force her to go hungry because someone else has a problem with it. I wouldn't force that person to go hungry because I was uncomfortable watching them eat!

Shannon - posted on 11/04/2010

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ok if it is not ok to breast feed in public wh is it ok for women/ girls to wear almost nothing to the pool? it ofends me and my sons i have 3 boys and I dont want them to see half naked people in public. I do breastfeed in public in fact last week I breastfed in a parts place if my baby is hunger he will eat. it is a part of nature. i have never had anyone say anything.

Krista - posted on 11/04/2010

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Go girl! lol...I breastfed my daughter up until one month ago and she turned 2 two days ago. I would always tell people to mind their business or ill mind it for them. Plain and simple. Respect me and Ill respect you. Disrespect me and my baby and get the same in return! Congrats on breastfeeding, Its a beautiful thing.

Katie - posted on 11/04/2010

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Yes actually... i was rudely told to keep my boobs to myself and i kindly replied... if it offends you don't look! If you were hungry and needed to eat and someone told you to go somewhere else wouldn't you be a little offended?? Breatfeeding is not any different than feeding from a bottle other than it's SOOOOO much better for my child. So if feeding my hungry child offends you you should probably stay home and not go out anymore cause lots of people like to eat out.

Leslie - posted on 11/04/2010

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AMEN! Of course, the only comment I have ever gotten at a restaurant was "of course she is happy, she just ate!"

Margaret - posted on 11/04/2010

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In all other states it wishy-washy at best! Written as it is in very loose 'legalese!' Wiht notwithstanding and other such meaningless prose! There is no New Law as it is not on the Federal Law. The legal protection for the nursing mother is simply not strong enough!

Margaret - posted on 11/04/2010

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Assuming that to harrass the nursing mother is illegal in that particulat state! All this talking about suing and 'the new law is not explicit enough -unless you happen to live in Wisconsin, where to do so is met with the complanant also being hit with a fine of $200.00!! In wisconsin it clearly states that to interfere with a mother breastfeed in illegal and the fine is statutory! lininkin it to present penal code!

Melody - posted on 11/04/2010

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you should report that restaurant! I dont know to who! but with the new law maybe you have a lawsuit.

Michelle - posted on 11/03/2010

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if a business actually aasked me to leave, i would sue them.
but i have been asked to cover up due to a customer complaint in a dennys once. i told them no, they said no hard feelings. that was my 3rd baby and even then, i was discreet enough that you couldnt see anything unless you were really looking for it. i agree with you and good for you! i always nurse mine until about 2.

Coco - posted on 11/03/2010

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I would memorize the above law and quote it to anyone who gives you an issue. I'm sorry you are having to go through this! Our society is so messed up. More power to you Momma! Stay in your strength.

TeBeth - posted on 11/03/2010

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see, u can try to be decrete about it or not. the point is no1 has the right to make a big deal over the way God made something. If you werent sapose to breast feed u wouldnt make milk. and the way i see it, is if its so grose or bothers you so much, stop looking and talking about it. youre free to leave. infact, get your food to go! bc i know my rights. i love it when ppl get grosed out bc the child is old enough to tell you shes hungry. my daughter looks practically 2 but she just turned 8 months. and ill breast feed her prolly til shes 14 months. why must ppl make a big deal? and your so lucky ur mall has a nursing station. thats so cool. it would be nice if other places had that. and i dont mind a dressing room to nurse, but if im in the food court or somewhere else im not going to get up, make my baby cry all the way there just so she can eat. ill feed her where im at. i dunno bout u, but i can get pretty cranky when im hungry too! lol

Amy - posted on 11/03/2010

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You are an amazing woman and mom! Keep doing what you're doing. Educate people in your area! I live in Germany and luckily no one has ever said anything to me. That being said, I live/work on a military installation and we are currently trying to post signs stating the congressional mandate that all woman have the right to bf in a government building if she is present! Way to go!

Jayne - posted on 11/03/2010

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Luckily i have never had that issue, I've own breastfeed in one public place and they are breastfeeding friendly. Those people who come up are uneducated and are the ones with the problem.

Andrea - posted on 11/03/2010

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i have never had a problem with it, but secretly i have hoped that someone would say something to me so i could tell them off!! that's mostly because while no one has ever said anything to me, people have stared rudely and glared at me for it, but don't have the nads to say anything. at least you know there are laws to protect you, and for that, be thankful, sowhip it out without fear lady!!

Aimee - posted on 11/03/2010

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wow that is crazy!!! i never had that problem and i breastfed my child no mater where we were... i used a breastfeeding cover so you couldnt see anything, and really most ppl couldnt tell that i was breast feeding! but wow, i would be wooping some ass if anyone came up to me and said that...

[deleted account]

I've never been asked to leave and I dare anyone to try!!! I'm no longer nursing (DS weaned himself @ 13 months much to my dismay). I got the weird looks occasionally but the only time people ever approached me were either other moms giving me the thumbs up or one time an older couple complimented me after the fact for nursing a baby so modestly, lol.

Sarah - posted on 11/03/2010

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Luckily, I live in California, and everyone is pretty open minded about it. I was a lot more self conscious about it with my son, but I've fed my daughter at the park, at restaurants, even at my book club! However, if I were you, and someone came up and told me to feed my daughter in the bathroom I would say as sweetly as I could,"If it bothers you so much, you are more than welcome to eat in the bathroom so you don't have to look at us. But my daughter has just as much right to eat here as you do, and this is how she eats." and just ignore them after that.

Tasha - posted on 11/03/2010

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OOOO let someone tell me to leave while Im feeding my daughter!!! I REFUSE to feed her in a dirty bathroom. The only time Ill go out to the car is if Im in a restaurant that I dont have enough room in the seat, or Im in a store that I really have no where to sit. I make sure if Im goin out that I wear two shirts that way I can pull down the under shirt and lift the top one and for the most part everything is covered except for what She needs. **shakes head** I think its awful that we cant even take care of our children in the natural way...the way we were suppose too....without catching slack! (no offense to FF lady's, I know a lot cant bf for some reasons) Gawd forbid another child or person may accidentally see a bit of nip; which Im sure at some time in their baby hood they were latched too as well...I think they have such a problem with it, STOP LOOKING.

Jennifer - posted on 11/03/2010

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I breastfed all four of my children in public... some longer than others. Most times people didn't even realize I was doing it. I would walk through Walmart or the mall or sit in a restaurant and was lucky that no one ever said anything to me. Once when I was breastfeeding my first daughter in a mall, a grandmotherly woman came up to me to see the baby...it wasn't until she reached over and pulled the blanket off my shoulder that she realized what I was doing. lol and a cousin of my husband had the same kind of reaction when I was feeding my son, he stood talking to me for about 10 minutes then realized what I was doing and got really embarrased that he was even in the same room. I always covered up ither with a blanket over my shoulder or I would wear a loose fitting t-shirt lifted up from the bottom so the baby would cover the lower part of my breast and the shirt would cover the top. I would also wear a tank top (same idea as the t-shirt) with a button down shirt over top that would keep the sides of my breasts covered.

Melissa - posted on 11/02/2010

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I have never had to tell off anyone. I've never been asked to stop breastfeeding or to leave. Nor would I tolerate it. I totally support you. I've breastfeed all three children in public, in restaurants at the table on the airplane, at the park. Actually, I'm still nursing my two 1/4 year old but mainly at naptime and bedtime or when she wants comforted.
I completely agree, I would not go nurse my child in the bathroom. They don't like it than they don't have to look.

Angelina - posted on 11/02/2010

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I breastfeed everywhere.I do not care.I will whip my boob out anywhere.It is natural and Gods way !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Jennifer Ann Saunders - posted on 11/02/2010

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Am so sorry that you had that happen to you. I fed my son in an airport, at a mall, on the airplane, and usually had very supportive people. I always covered up but around 8 months he decided he wanted to eat and see the world, so it got harder, but I adjusted. On the plane, the man next to me even helped hold up a blanket for me so I had privacy.

Good luck and we are all proud that you stuck up for yourself. You're a great mom for it.

[deleted account]

In my opinion, we often have difficulty distinguishing human rights from legal rights. My belief is that every child has the right be breastfed whenever and wherever he/she needs food/comfort, just as it is every mother's human right to breastfeed her baby whenever/wherever she desires.

Not everyone recognises these human right, so they have to be backed by the law, turning them into legal rights. Some people will recognise a legal right where they will not recognise a human right. Personally, I think it's a pity that we have to have such rights enshrined in law in order for some people to accept them.

So although I applaud the enshrining of the right to breastfeed as a legal right, I am sad that it had to come to this. My wish (in fantasy land here!) is that everyone would just take these human rights for granted, without the necessity for a legal document!

Margaret - posted on 11/02/2010

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Ladies! Ladies!

The awareness of being legally entitled to breast feed in public is in dipute by the sheer fact that women are being asked to leave catering establishments, some even being verbally abused given odd looks while they feed their chidren, and some being expected to feed their babies in all kinds of places!
- See Laura Hoffman's list of the various states on how this 'universal law' is written. It is a law which offers no shelter to the nursing mother! This pretty comprehensive list which Laura has kindly copied into this thread, shows that there are a couple of states that have no nursing rights being offered to them. So no, I disagree with your complacent assumption that every nursing mother has these rights! It seems very clear to me that not every nursing mother has this law to protect them! It is only legal in the state that it applies to!
In view of all the women who have written in and commented on this thread, I beleive that like Wisconsin, all the states should have it placed in their state law in words of modern English making it very clear that today's nursing mother has not only the courtesy, which most of the state laws afford, but the legal right to be allowed to sit with family in any state, and not be made to feel uncomfortable, nor made to leave the establishment where they 'have a legal right to be! According to the author of this thread, one person felt that she had right to be where she was doing what she was doing, another expressed a feeling of being ogled by others and another verbally abused!
The most recent and clearer interpretation made by Wisconsin's Governer Doyle clearly states that the nursing mother is to be left alone, and those that do not respect the nursing mother's right, are to be fined
$200USD!! That will make a lot of those who have driven mothers 'who do not beleive that nursing have rights to be there, think twice!
According to this thread, articles have been written about this incident, phone calls have been made and I understand letters may have been written, it drew my interest, 97 of us have contributed to this thread! Even some from outside the United States, and all admit to this incident happening to themselves, or know of it happening to someone they know!
This law that you speak of is only available to a few and the wording of that law, is shabbliy expressed! It needs to be changed to modern day English, not the doggerel of legalistic prose! And it should be the right of every nursing mother in every state! The problem needs to be not only addressed but resolved! Complaning to the establishment should not result in the nursing mother being shown the door, but the person who complains!

Heather - posted on 11/01/2010

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Had it happen ONCE. I blogged about it on Cafemom and a manager of the chain saw it, got it to the VP, who tracked me down to 1. apologize 2. ask what he could do to make me feel better (I asked for him to make sure all managers were aware of the law and that it never happened again) and he did what I asked. The asst. manager who harassed me was also demoted and her schedule changed. I was proud I spoke out and so upset that it ever happened :(

Jessy - posted on 11/01/2010

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i fed my daughter any where i would have fed her with a bottle i live in canada where it is completely legal to bear all of your breast in public ya moms who know their rights, i was however told frequently that it was disgusting, imorral, discraceful, dirty and so on

Amber - posted on 11/01/2010

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I have never had anyone to ask me to outright leave. I was sitting on a bench at walmart breastfeeding when one of the workers told me I could go into a dressing room. I said "no that is ok, I will stay here" and get the dirtiest look ever. Like I was really about to get up and unlatch the kid so I could move to a stinky dressing room. Nope! I breastfed for 26 months and that was the only time anyone said anything.

Teri - posted on 11/01/2010

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Many states have laws against this .. not sure where you live, but you could just bring a piece of paper with you. You can make it as un-obtrusive as possible -- cover up, but they can't make you stop.

Margaret - posted on 11/01/2010

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Laura Hoffman from Wisconsin wrote:
,

Governor Doyle just signed a new law that protects mothers and babies that are breastfeeding in public. Breastfeeding in public has always been legal in Wisconsin but in the past mothers didn’t have protection from harassment. Now they do – and protection with a penalty for the person that tells them to stop. The law says:

Right to breast-feed.
"A mother may breast-feed her child in any public or private location where the mother and child are otherwise authorized to be. In such a location, no person may prohibit a mother from breast-feeding her child, direct a mother to move to another location to breast-feed her child, direct a mother to cover her child or breast while breast-feeding, or otherwise restrict a mother from breast-feeding."

A person who interferes with that right is subject to a forfeiture not to exceed $200 under the general penalty provision under current law.


I just LOVE my states new law! It's the best one yet I think :)
-000-
Margaret writes:
I do beleive that the above post has restored my faith in human nature! Particularyl when there are teeth, all 200 of them to bite people in their wallet!! .

Thank you Laura! Perhaps the rest of us should approach our own State Governors with the request to adopt this as a universal state law which by citing our own experiences may prevent the situation from occurring to another breast feeding mother in the future!
What do you think girls! Are you up for that?
That we all send a letter to our State Governers, and also to Congress!
We won't know, until we try!??!

Merry - posted on 11/01/2010

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And please we should ban men against wearing the tight short shorts! You know the ones that leave nothing to the imagination! That's pretty creepy I say :p

[deleted account]

I once had to oversee an exam, and someone in the room had about a whole bottle of perfume on. One of those "cheap imitations!" It was awful. If I'd been responsible for marking that exam I would have failed her!

Rachel - posted on 11/01/2010

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Thats wonderful that Australia recognizes this as a basic right. I agree, bum cracks are seriously offensive. Lets outlaw obnoxious overdone perfumes too. Stinks!

Merry - posted on 10/31/2010

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Governor Doyle just signed a new law that protects mothers and babies that are breastfeeding in public. Breastfeeding in public has always been legal in Wisconsin but in the past mothers didn’t have protection from harassment. Now they do – and protection with a penalty for the person that tells them to stop.  The law says:



Right to breast-feed.

"A mother may breast-feed her child in any public or private location where the mother and child are otherwise authorized to be. In such a location, no person may prohibit a mother from breast-feeding her child, direct a mother to move to another location to breast-feed her child, direct a mother to cover her child or breast while breast-feeding, or otherwise restrict a mother from breast-feeding."



A person who interferes with that right is subject to a forfeiture not to exceed $200 under the general penalty provision under current law.





I just LOVE my states new law! It's the best one yet I think :)

Merry - posted on 10/31/2010

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South Dakota: "This term ["harmful to minors"] does not include a mother's breast-feeding of her baby."

Tennessee (.pdf): " A mother has a right to breastfeed her child who is twelve (12) months of age or younger in any location, public or private, where the mother and child are otherwise authorized to be present."

Texas: "A mother is entitled to breast-feed her baby in any location in which the mother is authorized to be."

Utah: "The county legislative body may not prohibit a woman's breast feeding in any location where she otherwise may rightfully be, irrespective of whether the breast is uncovered during or incidental to the breast feeding."

Vermont: "Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a mother may breastfeed her child in any place of public accommodation in which the mother and child would otherwise have a legal right to be."

Virginia: "No person shall be deemed to be in violation of [indecent exposure laws] for breastfeeding a child in any public place or any place where others are present."

Washington: "The act of breastfeeding or expressing breast milk is not indecent exposure."

West Virginia: No public breastfeeding laws.

Wisconsin (.pdf): "[Indecency law] does not apply to a mother's breast-feeding of her child."

Wyoming: "The act of breastfeeding an infant child, including breastfeeding in any place where the woman may legally be, does not constitute public indecency."

Wow tahts long but those are accurate except Wisconsin, my lovely state just updated the law!
I have all these printed out and put in my diaper bag just so if I travel I can avoid the non protected states!

Merry - posted on 10/31/2010

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New Mexico: "A mother may breastfeed her child in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be present."

New York: "Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a mother may breast feed her baby in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be, irrespective of whether or not the nipple of the mother's breast is covered during or incidental to the breast feeding."

North Carolina: "Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a woman may breast feed in any public or private location where she is otherwise authorized to be, irrespective of whether the nipple of the mother's breast is uncovered during or incidental to the breast feeding."

North Dakota (.pdf): No public breastfeeding laws. The bill SB 2344, currently under consideration by North Dakota State Senate, states as of 3/13/09: "If the woman acts in a discreet and modest manner, a woman may breastfeed her child in any location, public or private, where the woman and child are otherwise authorized to be."

Ohio: "A mother is entitled to breast-feed her baby in any location of a place of public accommodation wherein the mother otherwise is permitted."

Oklahoma (.rtf): "...a mother may breast-feed her baby in any location where the mother is otherwise authorized to be. Breast-feeding shall not constitute a violation of any provision of Title 21 of the Oklahoma Statutes [indecency laws]."

Oregon: "A woman may breast-feed her child in a public place."

Pennsylvania: " A mother shall be permitted to breastfeed her child in any location, public or private, where the mother and child are otherwise authorized to be present, irrespective of whether or not the mother's breast is covered during or incidental to the breastfeeding."

Rhode Island: "A woman may feed her child by bottle or breast in any place open to the public."

South Carolina: "A woman may breastfeed her child in any location where the mother and her child are authorized to be. Breastfeeding a child in a location where the mother is authorized to be is not considered indecent exposure."

Merry - posted on 10/31/2010

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Alabama: "A mother may breastfeed her child in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be present."
Alaska: "A municipality may not enact an ordinance that prohibits or restricts a woman breast-feeding a child in a public or private location where the woman and child are otherwise authorized to be. In a municipal ordinance, "lewd conduct," "lewd touching," "immoral conduct," "indecent conduct," and similar terms do not include the act of a woman breast-feeding a child in a public or private location where the woman and child are otherwise authorized to be."

Arizona: "A mother is entitled to breast-feed in any area of a public place or a place of public accommodation where the mother is otherwise lawfully present."

Arkansas: "A woman may breastfeed a child in a public place or any place where other individuals are present."

California: "Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a mother may breastfeed her child in any location, public or private, except the private home or residence of another, where the mother and the child are otherwise authorized to be present."

Colorado (.pdf): "A mother may breastfeed in any place she has a right to be."

Connecticut: "No person may restrict or limit the right of a mother to breast-feed her child."

Delaware: "Notwithstanding any provisions of law to the contrary, a mother shall be entitled to breast-feed her child in any location of a place of public accommodation wherein the mother is otherwise permitted."

Florida: "A mother may breastfeed her baby in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be, irrespective of whether the nipple of the mother's breast is uncovered during or incidental to the breastfeeding."

Georgia: "The breast-feeding of a baby is an important and basic act of nurture which should be encouraged in the interests of maternal and child health. A mother may breast-feed her baby in any location where the mother and baby are otherwise authorized to be."

Merry - posted on 10/31/2010

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Hawaii: "It is a discriminatory practice to deny, or attempt to deny, the full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of a place of public accommodations to a woman because she is breastfeeding a child."

Idaho: No public breastfeeding laws.

Illinois: "A mother may breastfeed her baby in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be, irrespective of whether the nipple of the mother's breast is uncovered during or incidental to the breastfeeding; however, a mother considering whether to breastfeed her baby in a place of worship shall comport her behavior with the norms appropriate in that place of worship."

Indiana: "Notwithstanding any other law, a woman may breastfeed her child anywhere the woman has a right to be."

Iowa: "Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, a woman may breast-feed the woman's own child in any public place where the woman's presence is otherwise authorized."

Kansas (.pdf): "A mother may breastfeed in any place she has a right to be."

Kentucky (.pdf): "Notwithstanding any other provision of the law, a mother may breast-feed her baby or express breast milk in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be. Breast-feeding a child or expressing breast milk as part of breast-feeding shall not be considered an act of public indecency and shall not be considered indecent exposure, sexual conduct, lewd touching, or obscenity... No person shall interfere with a mother breast-feeding her child in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be."

Louisiana: "Notwithstanding any other provision of law to the contrary, a mother may breastfeed her baby in any place of public accommodation, resort, or amusement... It is a discriminatory practice in connection with public accommodations for a person to deny an individual the full and equal enjoyment of the goods, services, facilities, privileges, advantages, and accommodations of a place of public accommodation, resort, or amusement, as defined in this Chapter, on the grounds that the individual is a mother breastfeeding her baby. This discriminatory practice in connection with public accommodations is prohibited."

Maine: "Notwithstanding any other provision of law, a mother may breast-feed her baby in any location, public or private, where the mother is otherwise authorized to be."

Maryland: A mother may breast-feed her child in any public or private location in which the mother and child are authorized to be. A person may not restrict or limit the right of a mother to breast-feed her child.

Bethany - posted on 10/31/2010

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I was asked by a security guard, while in the mall, to take my daughter to the bathroom in order to continue breastfeeding. He said he had gotten "complaints" from others concerning my " partial nudity". Meanwhile a 14 yr old walked by in the shortest skirt known to man and something that I think was a shirt. I was utterly shocked. All I did was tell the security guard that if he didn't eat his lunch or dinner next to a toilet why should my daughter have to. She is a person and has her own rights, and if he really had that big of a problem with it he should bring me a government book, in which gives him the right to talk to me about my breasts. All he said after I was done my rant was "have a good day ma'am". There is no reason why a child should be punished to eat next to a toilet, just because someone is uncomfortable with how I chose to raise my daughter. I am extremely uncomfortable to children dressing like hoochie moma's but that doesn't give me the right to talk to them. It is amazing how many people don't understand the process and benefits of breast feeding.

[deleted account]

Just getting back to the issue of overriding others' human rights - I really find bum cracks offensive. Have these blokes got a law that gives them the right to shove their hairy bums in my face?

Liesl - posted on 10/31/2010

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I haven't been asked to leave, but I am wondering if others besides me have had men walk by and suddenly are on tip toes, their heads up high, trying to look over the blanket. Drives me nuts! Like I can't tell they are trying to see.

[deleted account]

In Australia, Federal law protects a mother's right to breastfeed in public:
In Australian Federal Law breastfeeding is a right, not a privilege.


Under the federal Sex Discrimination Act 1984 it is illegal in Australia to discriminate against a person on the grounds of their sex. Discrimination on the grounds of sex is when a person is less favourably treated, directly or indirectly, than another person of the opposite sex would be treated under the same or similar circumstances. The Act makes sex discrimination against the law and gives effect to Australia's international obligations under the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW). The Act makes it illegal to discriminate in the provision of goods and services, accommodation, financial services, employment, sport or education.



In October 2002, 'to avoid doubt', the Australian Government amended the Act to explicitly recognise breastfeeding (including the act of expressing milk) as 'a characteristic that appertains generally to women'. The Act had always protected the rights of breastfeeding mothers, but did not specifically mention breastfeeding. The amendment aimed to address any confusion. It also made it clear that breastfeeding was a potential ground for unlawful discrimination against women on the basis of their sex. Other publications on the website of the Australian Human Rights Commission also include discrimination against a breastfeeding mother under pregnancy discrimination. A useful publication from the Australian Human Rights Commission is Getting to Know the Sex Discrimination Act: A Guide for Young Women. While not directly mentioning breastfeeding, this publication does explain your rights and responsibilities under the Act.



The Federal Government announced in May 2010 that it will be toughening its protection in the Act for women who want to breastfeed by specifically listing breastfeeding as grounds for discrimination in the workplace. This is a positive step in the right direction. The next step for the future will be to further amend the Act so that breastfeeding is included as a separate ground of discrimination in areas outside the workplace. This is something that the Australian Human Rights Commission, an independent statutory organisation established by the Australian Government, has been making submissions for. You may wish to write to your local federal member in support of this amendment
http://www.breastfeeding.asn.au/bfinfo/l...

There is more information on this website about laws in states and territories.

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