HELP ME!!! How much milk is suppose to come out when pumping?

Lavinia - posted on 03/27/2011 ( 5 moms have responded )

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I have a 6 week old baby and in a month or so will be returning to work. I have 38DD breast (sorry tmi ) and when I pump all im getting out in one session is 1/2 ounce on each breast so 1 ounce total. Please help

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Laura - posted on 03/27/2011

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first off, breast size has nothing to do with milk production. size a cups ,make just as much milk as size f cups. but to answer your question, it all depends. right now, if you have not been pumping regularly, your breasts make as much milk as your baby needs. when you start to add pumping sessions to your day, your asking your breasts to make more than your baby needs (its a good thing) it normally takes up to a week for your body to regulate that it needs to make more milk now and ups your supply enough to produce a good amount when you pump. so, my suggestion to you is to add at least two pumping sessions to your day, i know its seems like you wont ever have enough time, and keep in mind most women have a greater supply in the morning. in about a week you should see that you are getting more and more. also, when you are at work your baby will be missing feedings and then, in theory, you will be pumping out what they would have been getting if you had feed them. also, just to be safe, make sure you have set up your pump correctly and it is functioning. i had a woman at my nursing group that thought she wasn't getting any milk out, and really she had it hooked up wrong. i hope this helps.

Rachael - posted on 03/27/2011

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you may need to get a larger sized flange. The flange needs to cover most of your areola because that is what the suction needs to act on in order to release/stimulate milk. you can order larger flanges for most pumps

[deleted account]

The average pumping output is .5-2 oz total (from both breasts). So you sound about right. Pumping also takes practice. Some moms are never able to pump at all. You can try gently massaging your breasts while pumping or doing breast compressions. Some moms find that being near their babies or looking at a picture of baby (if they're at work) helps get more milk. Here's some great info on pumping:
http://www.kellymom.com/bf/pumping/

Click each question for more info. Good luck!

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[deleted account]

As others have said, breast size is no indicator of milk production. neither is the amount you can get when pumping. I couldn't produce a drop - some women can't! But i happily fed all 3 of my children for extended periods.
Some women find that, if they need to pump (for work or whatever) it can help to do it immediately after a feed, when the milk is still flowing, rather than try to do it "cold." Manual expressing was all i could manage, because I could control the flow better, and it's easier on the breasts. But it's so time-consuming!

The advice given by the other mums is definitely worth following.

All the best!

Rachael - posted on 03/27/2011

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It isn't that the breast size impacts the milk production, but rather a large size (mine swelled up to J/K cup when breastfeeding) can prevent the normal sized flange from allowing the pump to work efficiently. A larger flange might help make pumping easier in this case. The reason behind this is physiologic as the ducts that release and produce milk are located behind the areola, so if your areola is not being compressed by the pump it will not be as successful.

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