How do i know if first breast is empty?

Tarrah - posted on 02/10/2010 ( 4 moms have responded )

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we have done ten minutes per side since the week after my baby was born. now i hear from so many places that she should finish the first breast first, but how do i know when the first breast is finished?

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Martha - posted on 02/10/2010

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What I've been told by lactation consultants, and what seems the most logical to me, is let the baby nurse as long as she wants. The reason the baby should stay on the breast as long she can is so that she can get the "hind milk" which has more fats and is heavier than the "foremilk" that comes out first. If you switch breasts to quickly the baby will just get foremilk from both breasts, which can cause some issues with spitting up and can sometime upset newborn tummys. My daughter almost always just nursed on one side everytime she nursed from the start. If the baby starts to fuss after 10 or more mins then the flow probably slowed down and she probably "emptied" you out and thats when you should switch. Just know you are never truly empty because your body is constantly creating more milk. :)

Hope that helped!!! ♥!

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Tarrah - posted on 02/11/2010

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She used to fuss after ten min on one side, then seemed happier when i switched her, but no matter how long i nurse she usually doesnt pull off on her own. I just worry that if she has only one breast at say 1 then the other at 4 then back to the 1st at 7, she is going six hours without nursing on one side, could that hurt my supply?
this schedule is her own, by the way, if she gets hungry earlier i do feed on demand, but she usually goes 3 hours between feeds.

Minnie - posted on 02/11/2010

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Yes- Martha has it right- let your baby nurse on the first side until she's done (whenever she unlatches by herself or you notice very relaxed limbs). There's no need to nurse off of both breasts in one session and as Martha mentioned can cause problems if you cut your baby off at an arbitrary time limit (why do nurses always suggest the 10-15 minutes then switch?).



For some women however, even this will not fully empty the breast. You can tell your breast is sufficiently empty after your baby unlatches if you squeeze your areola and no milk easily comes out.



My daughter is 16 months old, and up untl about 12 months or so I had to nurse her several times on one side before nursing her on the second.



See:



http://www.llli.org/FAQ/foremilk.html



http://www.llli.org/FAQ/oversupply.html



http://www.llli.org/llleaderweb/LV/LVSep...

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