I breastfeeding my baby and she is not taking the bottle what should i do?

Malana - posted on 10/29/2008 ( 40 moms have responded )

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she will just cry every time i tries or someone else tries

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Erica - posted on 11/03/2008

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I am a breastfeeding mom of three. My middle child NEVER took a bottle. As we tried to get him to take a bottle, I had to leave and wait him out. So I begged my hubby not to let him go without milk for too long. After a couple hours passed, my hubby used a (clean) medicine dropper to drop milk into his mouth that way. But the method of trying to get him to take a bottle NEVER worked. My third child showed signs of following the same path, but luckily he is accepting the playtex dropins bottle. I really think it's a matter of nipple preference. The nipple on the playtex drop in system seemed the best match. I just don't agree with letting the babies scream for 12 hours. That's enough to make a baby pass out!!

Emily - posted on 11/03/2008

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I would try different types of nipples, and you cannot be the one to bottle feed until she's used to the bottle. Why take it from the bottle when the good are right there? She will cry, you just have to keep trying. My daugther never took a bottle, she went right from the breast to a sippy cup. If your daughter is old enough to take a slow flow sippy cup, you might want to try that instead.

Joyce - posted on 11/03/2008

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I have had two babies now with the same issue. What worked for both of them is a sippy cup with a soft spout, the ones for 4 month olds or six month old. Sit them up a bit and use kind of like a bottle.

Natasha - posted on 11/03/2008

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I know I am probably setting myself up to be flamed HUGE, but, frankly, I have never really felt that "beautiful" bonding experience that I thought I would. Couple that with flat nipples to start, low milk supply, a baby who didn't care for a pacifier and cluster feeding for about 6 straight weeks (and I am not talking just at night, I would nurse him for 1-2 HOURS and he would start to cry after 20 minutes) and I frankly hated breastfeeding. I got a lot of help and was told my latch was good, which didn't seem to help the initial 30-60 seconds of intense pain every time I latched him for 2 months. I never really gave him bottles, and now, 9 months later, I don't get to go anywhere or do things like my friends who bottle feed. I know he is getting what is best for him, which is what keeps me going, and it took months before I could say I didn't hate and resent every minute, but I have been away from him for 1 day in 9 months for 8 hours (not including bedtime) and while I admire those who relish their time, it isn't fair to assume that everyone is the same and shares the same opinions and experiences. The fact you are even TRYING to breastfeed while a single mom to me is incredible. (PS, I don't know where you live, but I am in Ontario Canada, where we have a year mat leave, I can't imagine having to be back to work already, a friend we know in the US only had 6 weeks(???) and I just can't imagine!)

[deleted account]

My baby did this at 5 mths. I waited too long to introduce the bottle. Try to bring it out and talk about in a REALLY excited tone, like it's a toy. Have her play with it for a bit and then practice sucking on it (even if she mostly spits it out). Do this every day, building up to spending more and more time practicing drinking. If you stay positive, don't freak out, and keep at it, she should take it eventually. My babe took the bottle after 3 days of practice. Oh, and practice when she's not starving for a feeding.

Kimberly - posted on 11/03/2008

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Try a sippie cup with a soft nipple spout, it's called a nuby, works great, my 3 month old is teething I put ice cubes in and as they melt I've noticed she is sipping the water.

[deleted account]

My son is 2 and though i still breastfeed at night i got him on a bottle,i try'ed different bottles but didn't work so i settled for one,i left a bottle of milk on the tabble no breast and he took it arfter 4 hours that wos when he wos 11months any younger then that of walking age is near impossible as thay can fight by screeming once thay get to walking age thay can help them selfs. unless u work it would be a bit easier some one else could feed them.

Debbie - posted on 11/03/2008

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There is so much good advice here and different things will work for everyone. Here is what we did. My hubby gave the bottle when I was in a different room. This did not go over terribly well, and we had to try 3 different kinds of bottles/nipples until we found the one that our little man would take. (Also took us a while to figure out that we needed to warm the bottle to breast temp - duh us!) Then he would eat from the bottle for about 5 minutes and then fuss, so I would take over. We realized that we were teaching him that all he had to do was eat 5 minutes and then cry to get what he wants - bad lesson! So our Dr. suggested feeding him at the breast first, then switching to bottle instead of breast #2. The other thing that worked was that I would give him the bottle. He would start at the breast, and when he would pop off for a break, I would pick up the bottle. He would start drinking before he realized that it wasn't the same thing! He is now 3 1/2 months, drinks from a bottle at daycare and for daddy when I need to be away, and I am becoming a pro at pumping all over the place!
Good luck!

Caitlin - posted on 11/03/2008

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Hi there,



you should try having someone else give her the bottle, not you and make sure that you are out of her line of sight when she is getting it. Try the playtex brand it is close to the breast because it is harder to get the milk out, more so than other brands out there (I tried a few). try doing at a time of day that she would be getting it when your not going to be around, like if you are going back to work give it to her at the times you would be at work. Try warming up the nipple of the bottle, just in warm water sometimes the nipple is cold and that makes them not want it as much. It sounds kinda mean but if you wait till she is really hungry she may take it.

Sarah - posted on 11/03/2008

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Try giving her a bottle of milk yoyu've just expressed. The temperature will be exactly what she's used to and may help.

Sarah - posted on 10/31/2008

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my little girl did this about a month ago and I was feeling panicked...I needed to be able to get away sometimes and let daddy give a bottle of expressed milk!

We kept trying everyday.. my husband would put it to her mouth and let her decide to take it instead of cramming it in! We also tried different nipples until we found one that would work for her. It's best to let someone else introduce the bottle...a little crying is ok, keep trying...don't let her get so hungry she is hysterical, though.

Good luck!

Tracy - posted on 10/31/2008

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Let me just clarify about the honey, since some people have responded to that which I totally understand! I didn't mean like use a huge amount just a little!!!!!!!!! But if don't feel comfortable about it then don't do it, just go with what you feel is right. We as woman love to give our opinions, I was just trying to help because I've seen it work with my nephew and he is just fine.

Aimee - posted on 10/31/2008

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I had the same problem with my son. I had to go back to work, so I had no options. We tried several different kinds of bottles. He would just cry until I got home from work. But eventually we found a bottle he would take and he got hungry enough to take it. Just hang in there, she will take one eventually.

Lauri - posted on 10/31/2008

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Malana, I SO understand. I was a single mom when my 17 yo was born. When she's hungry enough she'll take a bottle. Sometimes we get wrapped up in all the busy things we need to do and it is very important for single moms to take a break. Nursing when it is just the two of you can give you the break you need to just sit for a bit and read a book. Babies aren't ready to feed themselves from a bottle until 6 months anyway.



Also: IT IS DANGEROUS TO GIVE AN INFANT HONEY BEFORE 1 YEAR - most pediatricians will tell new moms this. Taste buds develop as the baby grows, so they aren't going to have a preference towards tastes quite yet anyway. What she's wanting is your skin to skin contact, your smell, and the familiar sound of your heartbeat. These things help her develop in a wide variety of ways - this is why babies who are not held at all can develop the failure to thrive syndrome. This doesn't mean she can't ever be away from you, it just means that she may have to get very hungry before she'll take a bottle from someone else.



I know its so ALL consuming right now, but it really does go so quickly. It is still VERY important for you to have some time to yourself on a regular basis. Reach out to friends and family members for assistance. You may want to find a babysitting co-op where you can trade. I've known of nursing co-ops, where nursing mothers babysit for eachother so the babies can nurse from the other mom (like a wet nurse).

Carrie - posted on 10/31/2008

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Have you tried a sippy or even a finger feeder? If you get really desperate you can use a syringe or eye dropper. I went back to work full time at 14 weeks and my husband stayed home. For the first two days he refused to drink anything (and I was a wreck) but by day 3 he got into a routine and finally took a little, then a little more, then a little more. Make sure you're trying different positions too. Sometimes baby will like to be held in a "breastfeeding" position, sometimes they like to be held facing out so they can see the world still. LLL has been a huge help to me, see if there's a chapter near you - it's free to go to meetings and is a great help. www.llli.org

Tracy - posted on 10/31/2008

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My sister in law was having the same problem. Her 8 month old wouldn't take the bottle at all. So she tried just a little bit of honey on the nipple of the bottle and he licked it and then took a sip and basically sucked the whole bottle down! He just needed to get use to the milk coming out since it's so different from your breast. Hope that helps. Don't give up keep trying! I only say that because it's so good for us moms to be able to have a little break once in awhile especially if someone else can feed your baby. I know I'm learning that too!

Tammy - posted on 10/31/2008

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Hi Malana, I have the same problem with my 8 month old, she won't drink from a bottle or cup, i am going away for a hen's night and have to leave Gemma with my husband and hope she will drink from a cup or bottle, it makes life hard sometimes when you cannot leave for more than 2 to 3 hours because you don't know if they might want a feed. Hope you have some luck soon.

Tammy.

Malana - posted on 10/31/2008

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i am not going to "stop" breastfeeding i need her to take the bottle cuz i am a very busy person and i am a single mother so i am sure u mit understand why i would not be able to always be there for her @ all the time and if her father wants to take her then she need to be able to take it ....

[deleted account]

I know they say not to introduce the bottle until at least a month but my husband did earlier behind my back one time and my son has never had a problem taking.

Sarah - posted on 10/30/2008

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Both my daughter and now my son took the bottle right off the bat. I fed both their first bottles when my husband wasn't home. I made sure it was quiet and relaxed. At first they were a little confused but once they realized that there was milk in there they gobbled it up. The bottle nipple makes all the difference too. Because it's harder for the baby to suck from your breast finding the slowest flow nipple available may help baby adjust better to the bottle.

Jennifer - posted on 10/30/2008

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Malana,

My son is a little over 3 months and the first time I tried to give him breastmilk out of a bottle, my husband had to do it with me out of the room. We use the Dr. Brown's natural flow bottles which seem to work really well. They cut down on gas and they flow more like a breast does. The nipple shapes aren't necessarily true to the breast, but my son will take pumped milk out of them now from me or anyone else who has tried to feed him with the bottle. Don't give up, she'll eventually learn that the milk she loves can come to her in two ways. One other thing I found that helped was to hold my son in a cradle position but keep him high enough that he couldn't turn his head to try to root right on my nipple through my clothing. I hope this helps you.

Cassie - posted on 10/30/2008

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andrea.. i don't think it is fair to the poor girl who is just asking for tips.. it is her choice to continue or stop feeding her bubs.. i stopped feeding my son at 1 week, my boobs were too full and i couldn't latch him on properly no mater how long i pumped it didn't bring them down, i was cracked sore and bleeding.. my son was throwing up my blood.. that was a really hard decision to stop for me.. i felt like i let him down but it was really really bad..



so if malana wants to stop she can, she has done amazingly to go for 4 or so months.. plus she didn't say she was stopping, she just asked what can she do cause her baby doesn't take the bottle.. she might be wanting to pump and give breast milk in the bottle..

[deleted account]

If she is not working or studying then i do not understand why?

The time goes so fast breastfeeding is such close bonding with your child time you should cherish and you can never get back



My little one is 4 1/2 months and exclusively breastfed and i have left him for up to 4-6 hours at a time its about being organised and if they go down for a big sleep then you can.



In the last 4 months while breastfeeding i have had severe pain for 3 months of it with gore bladder issues and been crippled screaming in pain, had the opperation to remove the gore bladder and the stuck stone - had another opperation to remove 2 wisdom teeth that came through and i still exclusively breastfeed. Even after the opp when i was in severe pain.



Everyone has mobile phones and if i duck out and he wakes up and paul (my partner) can not settle him he gives me a call.



So this is why i was curious as to why she wanted the bub to take a bottle for as their is ways around it and with planing and organisation it still can be done

Danielle - posted on 10/30/2008

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well i have breastfeed 6 kids and just the last two were like that and all i did was give then water at first then i did the milk and it was breast milk or can milk and right now my baby just tuned one and she is starting to take milk all the time from a bottle.

Laney - posted on 10/30/2008

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Give her another 8 weeks or so and she'll be starting solids. That usually makes it easier :) In the meantime, try to enjoy the closeness :) They grow up so fast :)

Elizabeth - posted on 10/30/2008

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I put my first on a sippy cup at 6 months. I never did a bottle because a bottle is harder to break then a cup. my second only gets a bottle when shes in the nursery at church and that took some coaching from myself and a friend who bottle fed her first. Remember to be relaxed when you try. Even if its not skin to skin she can still pick up on weather or not you are stressed and that just adds to her stress.

Beth - posted on 10/30/2008

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obviously, so she can leave her baby for ANY amount of time in the first...um..YEAR.:)

Christy - posted on 10/30/2008

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My daughter did the same thing, but at four months she would drink from the bottom of a straw with my finger on the top of the straw. At five months she would drink from the top of a straw. I have tried everything, until I found something to work. Good Luck!

Cassie - posted on 10/29/2008

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i fed my daughter for 6 months, when i got her onto the bottle my hubby had to feed her. she kept wanting me.. she cried but after a while of encouragement she drank.. only 50 mils to start with then more each time we tried.. if you are alone and can't get someone else to help, try lying on a bed with a pillow covering your chest, keep your head close, so she can still see you but isn't close enough to want mums milk. just keep trying, if you give up and give her what she wants then she will expect that each time, and will just cry till she gets it.. good luck :-)

Brittney - posted on 10/29/2008

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my doctor told me to leave my daughter with someone that I trusted and someone willing to put up with her cries for 12 hours. He said that if left without food for that long and only a bottle as an option the baby will take the bottle because when its like (eating bottle) or death(waiting for mom) the baby will always take the bottle. He said the big thing is that I had to be gone from that house and I couldn't have her be watched at my house because if she could smell me then she wouldn't take the bottle. It worked very well. She willingly take a bottle or me now.

Jennifer - posted on 10/29/2008

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We went through this same thing with our 3 month old. What worked for us is we sat her in front of a baby einstein video(to distract her) she fussed at first but eventually it worked and she takes a bottle now.

Lauri - posted on 10/29/2008

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Babies get more than just nourishment from nursing that are very important to growth and development. The World Health Organization recommends that children should nurse for 2 years (the frequency decreases when food is introduced) - in the US the recommendation is 1 year because it is a harder sell here.



In our society it can be inconvenient but it is NOT an indulgence.



That said, she may never take a bottle from you because she's also wanting the closeness and connection she gets from nursing. That doesn't mean she won't take it from someone else. Sometimes it is a matter of nipple shape... usually though, they are missing mom... (can't fake warmth, sounds & smell). Mine usually finally took the bottle when they got hungry enough. Luckily I'm able to arrange my work schedule so that I'm never away from her for more than 4 hours at a time. It does feel like being tied at the hip... but that first year goes by real quick. Once solids are introduced they nurse less often.



You can wait a couple more months and introduce the sippy cup.



I'm very pro-nursing, but I know that sometimes work has to come first and this isn't always practical.



There are some great tips at www.llli.org and you can find support groups in your area at this site.

Candace - posted on 10/29/2008

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My 4 month old daughter wouldn't take a bottle. The doctor said to feed her with a small cup. I tried that and it didn't work. I finally fed her a little bit of rice cereal on a spoon with breast milk ( I used cereal to make the milk a little thicker so it would stay on the spoon). She really liked getting fed that way and started drinking from a bottle that same day. She just needed to figure out that food can come in other ways.

Dawn - posted on 10/29/2008

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My son was the same at first. We had to try 5 different types of bottles before he would accept one that was closet to my breast shape. I also made sure that he wasn't extremely hungry before giving it to him. And I had someone else give it to him at first. Now he is 10 months old and just uses a sippy cup. He hasn't had a bottle in about 4 months. I would say try different bottles and if she can sit up alone then offer a sippy cup instead. I gave my son water in the sippy cup to passify til I could nurse him.

Stacey - posted on 10/29/2008

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Well, I have actually had the same problem with my second, and the third will not take a bottle in our home. All I can say is keep trying and try different bottles. It turns out my little girl will take the plain old time bottles that we used when young, the inexpensive ones. Good luck

Laurelle - posted on 10/29/2008

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im having the same problem she wont take a bottle from you cause shes used to your breasts and it dosen't taste the same in a bottle either

clementine will get livid if anyone tries to feed her the bottle depending on her age try a sippy cup it might work for some one else to try and feed it to her

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