Question on why even pump?

Bret - posted on 07/18/2012 ( 56 moms have responded )

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My name is Bret, I'm actually a Dad who is a web developer at Circle of Moms (I'm listed as a mom for testing purposes). I have a two-week old named Nila, and she is a hungry little girl!

My wife Kenyette is breastfeeding & pumps twice daily. Often times she pumps and then feeds Nila everything she just pumped! She says Nila is hungry and she just drained her breasts. I reply why even pump?

I feel pumping is for the purpose of freedom and rest for my wife. If she has milk available I can get up and feed Nila in the middle of the night so my wife can rest, or my wife can go do something for herself during the day and feed Nila without having to break out a boob.

I'm not advocating starving Nila, but pumping then feeding it all back to her doesn't seem to serve a purpose.

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Celeste - posted on 07/18/2012

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I actually agree with you, Bret LOL Pumping is such a pain for me so I didn't pump at all (but I was a SAHM, so there really wasn't a need).

If she's pumping because she thinks she's hungry, the best thing to do is to nurse her more. Baby is much more effective than a pump. Plus, she's 2 weeks old and it's totally normal for her to constantly nurse at this age. Breasts aren't necessarily "empty". Baby will signal her breasts to make more milk.

Stephanie - posted on 07/18/2012

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Hi Bret,
Feeding a baby as young as 2 weeks a bottle is not a great idea if your wife wants to breastfeed exclusively. It is much easier to get the milk out of the bottle, than from the breast. The baby may get lazy and just refuse the breast all together, waiting for the bottle.
My baby girl would eat about every 20 minutes when she was two weeks old. It's basically feeding all day and that's it for the first month or so. It gives mom a chance to rest! Lol

Kathyoconnell2010 - posted on 07/18/2012

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if she wants to pump to rest she should pump after the feed and then what she has pumped will be there for when she wants to rest and the baby will be full already but its recommended to wait 4 weeks before introducing a bottle because the baby may prefer the bottle and then not feed from the breast

Krystle - posted on 07/18/2012

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I agree! I don't know why mother's feel like they have to pump. It is, in fact not as good for the baby. Some of the benefits of breastfeeding are that it is at the perfect temperature, that it varies during the feed from foremilk to hindmilk, and it changes it's composition at different times of the day, etc.



In fact, I just read a new study that found that babies bottle fed formula where more likely to be obese than breastfeed infants....which isn't new info, the new and surprising info was that babies bottle fed breastmilk were still more likely to be obese adults than those who were just breastfeed. It's not JUST the milk, it's the method too!



Obviously, it's not harmful if your wife pumps once and awhile. And obviously breastmilk is a much better option than formula, so if you can't breastfeed, pumping is still great. But FROM the breast is best! :)



I would also like to add that babies are FAR more efficient at removing milk from the breast than any pump is. So pumping early on instead of breastfeeding is actually hindering her supply!

User - posted on 08/02/2012

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A womans body has one oz more in her breasts than it is possible to pump. she may feel like her baby drained her breasts but that is not possible. your body works on a supply and demand basis. if baby is hungry body makes milk. pumping is actually counteractive in that way because it is not the same stimulation for your body that the baby can give to make more milk. I read somewhere to think of it as a glass of water. As you are drinking the glass imagine someone pouring more into it. as you drink more and get closer to the bottom they pour even more. her body is constantly making milk. as long as she will let the baby 'ask' for it. if you took the water out of the cup and put it in another cup and drank it. yeah the first cup would be full by the time you go back to drinking it. but there was no point in doing the transfer in the first place.

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Tina - posted on 10/06/2012

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2 weeks is much too soon to begin pumping. Her breasts are still getting used to supply/demand. The best thing to do is wait until the baby is well established on breastfeeding and around 6 weeks in age. The breast continues to produce milk while suckled. It doesn't just only give xxx ounces and stop. Pumping should be reserved for time away from the baby and during the usual nursing time.

Patricia - posted on 09/24/2012

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breast can get sore it can help with preventing mastitis if she feels more comfortable pumping than putting her breast out at least she is still giving your baby breast milk mine was never good enough be happy she can do that pumped or not i never felt very good about sticking my breasts out ibn front of ay one even my older children to breastfeed

Stephanie - posted on 09/24/2012

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It can get Nila use to taking a bottle, so your wife can get away if she needs a break or if she does want to pump and have it available for you to feed her at night. If you never offer her a bottle, trust me it can be hard to get them to take it if you wait too long. That being said, I would not offer it too often at first, they figure out quickly that a bottle is less work than nursing. Good Luck...

West - posted on 09/24/2012

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I don't know how many storage containers you have but I'm typically a high volume producer. It was to the point where the fridge and freezer were full and all the containers were full. I would feed my babies and they'd get overly full and my breast would still be full. If end up pumping then feeding the milk at the next feeding. Also I like the idea of knowing how much milk my child is getting.

[deleted account]

In that situation, I agree with you that it seems pointless to pump. Pumping in addition to breastfeeding can help boost milk production, so that's a plus. When my son was a baby my production was very high, and I pumped to relieve the pressure. I froze everything I pumped though, and I was very glad I did because when I went back to work my milk production decreased drastically (even though I pumped at work), so I was very grateful to have my stock pile of frozen milk to supplement for my little man. I am very proud to say he never had to have formula!

Shauna - posted on 09/03/2012

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Is she getting used to pumping before going back to work or is she just less comfortable feeding from her breasts? You should talk to her and let her know that you're willing to support her- after all, she's doing all the work.

Rebekah - posted on 09/02/2012

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Does she feel "touched out"? Is she pumping and then giving someone else the opportunity to feed baby? With my 1st, I really struggled with my baby being on me all the time. The pump gave me a little bit more, "me time." I would pump, and then hand the freshly pumped milk to my husband to feed. Or pump, and then prop a bottle for him in a bouncy chair. It kept me sane.



With my other two kids I really only pumped when I was going to be out in public. Often times I would pump on the way somewhere (while my husband drove) and then would give a bottle a little while after arriving at our location.



Another reason for pumping and then immediately feeding would be to get the baby used to a bottle. If she's planning to go back to work, the baby will need to know how to take breast-milk from a bottle.

Merry - posted on 09/01/2012

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Jamie, pumping is not a recommended way to feed your baby. If you can't latch baby on, it can be made to work, but it is nNot ideal. Just don't want you trying to say that it's ideal to pump only.

It is not a good idea to watch the ounces when feeding a baby. We aren't supposed to know how many ounces they eat! This is why boobs are not see through:)

Babies are designed to fall asleep at the breast, there's nothing wrong with this and they absolutely can get full meals at the breast.

Heidi - posted on 08/31/2012

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I definitely agree with you. If she is a working mom i understand pumping to get up a supply, but if she isn't, pumping just to feed it directly to the baby doesn't make much sense to me. Yeah the baby is still getting the benefit of the breastmilk, but the bonding wonderful experience is being lost. I'm totally not saying your wife is doing anything wrong, but it seems like the pumping is just kind of a waste of time at this point. Especially with the baby being so young.

Jamie - posted on 08/30/2012

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Pumping is a GREAT way to measure how much milk Nila is getting. If she's still fussy after finishing 2 ounces then you will know it's probably due to something else. I exclusively pumped with my second so I made sure he was eating a FULL meal and was never crying out of hunger. This also works great for getting them to sleep longer since most babies fall asleep at the breast never get full tummies.

Vanessa - posted on 08/30/2012

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if she's on a schedule of pumping, her body will adapt to that schedule and the amount of milk, I as a bf mom, would definately want to get my child on a schedule first and if I needed expressed milk I would then find time for that and idk if she's worried about how much your daughter is eating, but all you have to do is watch the time between feedings and count the number of wet diapers and she'll be just fine, good luck to you all

Chelsey - posted on 08/30/2012

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I pump because I want to build up enough of a supply that if anything happens to me or my supply then my baby will still continue to get breast milk... I guess it is just a safety precaution!

User - posted on 08/27/2012

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well they say it helps produce more milk which wasnt true in my case having my daughter latched on helped more, and when the breast get really engorged they hurt pretty bad so its a relief more than anything, but at least that is my view in pumping is for relief or storage like you said, other than that i didnt feel it was needed for anything else

Maria - posted on 08/26/2012

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I agree. She should save what she is pumping for later use. If the baby is hungry she should nurse more. As long as the baby is gaining weight, then the baby is not starving.

Merry - posted on 08/25/2012

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As for me? I never pump for my own kids. I don't want them having bottles and I hate pumping. I only pump to donate to other babies!

Breastfeeding is so simple and easy once you both learn how to do it. Why complicate it with all the pumping if i don't need to work!

Merry - posted on 08/25/2012

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The pump is a nice tool!

But with all tools, they're not always needed.

If mom and baby need to be seperated, then pump

If mom has a low supply then pump and save the milk after each feed, don't use the milk or it won't increase supply!

Ifmom has pain in nursing she can try a nipple shield, but introducing a bottle too soon can cause baby to refuse the breast

If mom is tired and wants to rest, breastfeeding is more convenient then pumping!

Encourage your wife to nurse on cue. It willbe often! This is good and healthy.

If she has to leave for work later, then sure pump extra and save it. But she can't feed it to the baby! Orthewise she will become an exclusively pumping mom and this is tiring and inneffective.



And I gotta say a big heartfelt awwwww at a dad comming forward and asking such a sweet question on behalf of his wife and daughter :)

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Pumping is useful for a number of things. Yes, it helps Dad bond with baby too, and provides freedom for mommy, but there are other things. Our skin gets sore from suckling baby, and sometimes a small rest helps the skin heal. Also, she may not know if she wants to go to the store, or if something may come up - if it does, you have the milk you need, and if it doesn't, feed it to her like normal. Not to mention, each mommy is different, and some people are sore or exhausted after a baby clings for an hour to get off for a bit and right back on - pumping means they eat more quickly, and mom can read while she pumps ;)

Bekah - posted on 08/21/2012

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That is awesome that you keep a water bottle for her and support her and encourage her. That is really important because if she is thirsty than she is already past dehydrated!! And support from the spouse is vital for continuing bf'ing.
You can also combine breast milk with what has already been pumped just make sure to use the oldest date when dating the bag.
Per La Leche (LLLI) "All milk should be dated before storing. Storing milk in 2-4 ounce amounts may reduce waste. Refrigerated milk has more anti-infective properties than frozen milk. Cool fresh milk in the refrigerator before adding it to previously frozen milk."
You are an awesome dad for doing this for your family!!! Keep up the good work!

Tella - posted on 08/21/2012

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i do this sometimes as well. I found that if you introduce the little one to the bottle early they are more likely to accept it then if you strickly breastfeed for the first few months. I look at it as securing my abilitly to leave her with babysitters or a grandma in the future.

Bekah - posted on 08/18/2012

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I would have to agree with you Bret.
Babies are actually more efficient pumps than breast pumps. Even after pumping she could nurse and Nila would still get milk.
Like Rebecca Paton said - She should be feeding Nila then pumping so that Nila is full and then she can use the remainder later.

It may be that your wife feels better when she can measure the amount that Nila is getting or pumping may be more comfortable for her though.
I would really just open up communication with her to find out why she is doing it that way.

Veronica - posted on 08/17/2012

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alot of people say its alot better that moms breastfeed them because thats the way babys connect to their mommys!! she should only pump when she feels that her breast are really full. or for example since u said u like to help ur wife ffed ur daughter at night just let her pump at night before going to bed. and if she has things to do during the day and u will be staying with the baby let her bump before she leaves. either way breastmilk is good for at 6 months as long its in the cooler!!!

Sashell - posted on 08/11/2012

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Maybe her breasts hurt, or breastfeeding itself is uncomfortable. I had latching issues with my two daughters and it hurt so bad to breastfeed that it was a better option to pump and then feed.

User - posted on 08/08/2012

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I pumped and breastfed baby to bring up my supply quick an also to relieve my boobs! I had a problem with the little one latching correctly no matter how many times we tried to correct it with the Lactation consultant. So it felt that I was hugely engorged all the time even after pumping. I'm no expert but pumping can help give your missus a break and a chance for you to bond with bubs. The other reason I pump is so that my hubby can enjoy bonding time feeding bubs too. :)

User - posted on 08/03/2012

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Why does she not feed from her breast, then pump after.....that way, baby is full, and you get milk to have for later. The more you do this the more your wife will produce. She will always have enough milk...unless medical problem.

User - posted on 08/02/2012

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by the way, pumping and feeding does NOT increase supply. pumping and throwing away and then feeding does. pumping and feeding is more likely to lower supply.

Renee - posted on 07/31/2012

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I'm a mum of 2 premmies and I would pump then feed because of a couple of reasons which would apply to full term babies as well.
Firstly because they get tired and may not fully feed (drinking from a bottle is easier)
Secondly it also helps to increase/ maintain milk supply

Tine - posted on 07/31/2012

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Yes, I think that pumping need only be done when necessary. It is time consuming and tedious! I pump once a day to donate milk to another family, and to give my 3 year old some milk to support her immune system in winter. I never pumped with my daughter, who I fed for 3 years.

Really, you'd only need to pump if you can't breastfeed for one of a variety of reasons, if you must be separated from baby and someone else has to feed him, or to build up a low supply.

There seems to be a belief that pumping is part of breastfeeding, perhaps because we don't feel comfortable just trusting our bodies to do what they're meant to - gotta insert some kind of technology in there somewhere...! ;-)

Missy - posted on 07/31/2012

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I agree with those that say pump after feeding. If you wife is exhausted, and dehydrated. Make sure she has plenty of water by her side while she is nursing. Milk was the production inducer for me, the more milk I drank the more I produced. I know that is not true with everyone. I also consumed probably 7x the food I would normally eat in a day, I ate more when I was nursing than when I was pregnant. My now 3 year old daughter had no formula and I was able to stock pile enough breast milk by pumping after she got her fill. Freezing it worked wonders for when I went back to work. Good luck :) and tell her not to stress out about it, that also makes a difference.

Sally - posted on 07/31/2012

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The baby is the BEST pump. I pump alot, purely because my son will only nurse from one side at a time. I would recommend to your wife that she nurse the baby FIRST and then pump when she's done IF she still feels full.

Natasha - posted on 07/30/2012

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Basically pumping gives you the opportunity to feed the baby and bond with her as well.. There are times when the baby is actually sleeping for a few hrs and makes sense to pump.. supply and demand type of thing.. i pump because my baby actually refuses to eat because he is aware that my supply is low.. and also it gives her the option to run and do errands and still give the baby her milk while she is gone..

Kris - posted on 07/29/2012

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I had to pump to get the supply up enough for my twins; that's one of the main reasons for pumping, to get more milk. As someone else said, have your wife pump AFTER feeding--milk straight from the breast is always the better choice.

This soon in the process I don't think many moms have enough milk to store very much, but if you want to do more bottle feeds later on or have extra milk on hand in case of emergencies, pumping now will increase the supply enough that you'll see more dramatic benefit later.

I also recommend finding a lactation consultant through your hospital or medical group for *any* questions! They're wonderful folks who can help out for the hands-on type stuff. Good luck, and congrats on nursing your baby! It's hard work, and your wife deserves a tip of the hat! (As do you for your support.)

Susan - posted on 07/29/2012

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I think she should do whatever works for her and don't listen to anyone else except your pediatrician. I breast feed and pump, and at first thought I was doing wrong, but it works for me, my husband, and my baby, and I'm proud of how I feed her. I'm returning to work next week and and am glad I've been doing both this whole time because it'll definitely help ease the transition.

Margarita - posted on 07/28/2012

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You can definitely freeze small amounts of milk. Heck, it is often recommended that you store milk in 2 oz batches so it can thaw faster when you need it. Definitely make sure she's hydrated as others mentioned, but also make sure she eats enough. It is one of those lesser known facts that it takes more calories to feed a baby than it takes to make one. Sooo, unless she gained a ton of weight, this isn't the time to skip meals. The simplest way to remember this is to make sure she snacks while she nurses. I used to keep trail mix in my dresser drawer for that very purpose. Good luck!

Nicole - posted on 07/27/2012

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I must say I had to reply because I was in the same boat. I was driving myself crazy and m ylife was consumed with pumping and nursing! Finally, I put down the pump! Our lives were much more enjoyable after I made that choice. The time I spent pumping was filled with 1 of the other 1,000 things to do in the day or simply relax or take a nap while the baby does. I understand everyone is differant but this is my little story.

Tresca - posted on 07/24/2012

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Pumping and feeding can increase milk supply, but also, she may hit growth spurts down the road and you may need some reserve. It will stay good in the freezer for up to 6 months if stored in the back. If she's not keeping any as a reserve, the only thing it will do is make your daughter not want to breastfeed because it comes out slower from the breast than a bottle. Make sure you only use slow flow nipples and I would suggest she pump early a.m. before baby wakes, and after baby goes to bed and only breastfeed during the day. Pumps don't get out as much milk as a baby can, so she may diminish her supply feeding it all right back to her. Hope this helps. Gaia Herbs makes a supplement called Lactate Support. I take that and Fenugreek 3x daily and drink 4-5 cups of Mother's Milk Tea. I buy in bulk on Amazon and get it all free shipping and cheaper and it really helped my supply. Also, pumping isn't just to get milk, so tell her to pump after feedings. nothing may come out, but she is simulating higher demand and her breasts will make more milk.

Lori - posted on 07/23/2012

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I forgot to mention, that to boost production have her eat oatmeal at least 3 times a week, if not everyday! Another one that worked for me was nursing tea found at grocery stores or natural food stores. They both boost production. Definitely drink lots of water! When I was pregnant or nursing, I drank 8 glasses of water a day, and took 2 more to bed.

Kathyoconnell2010 - posted on 07/23/2012

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dont worry about the ounces breastfed babies take the same amount except during growth spurts ,usually 1-3 ounces

Jeannie - posted on 07/23/2012

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How much is she pumping? If she is pumping to release the pressure in her breasts then it is ok. I had to do that with both of my kids. Yes she should pump right after a feeding, it will stimulate more milk to be produced with out taking away from the next feeding. Your daughter might be cluster feeding, which means feeding for a longer time and or feeding very frequently. Babies do this to build up mother's milk supply before the hit a growth spurt.

If your baby is growing fine save the milk and have your wife nurse her again. In most cases feeding and then pumping will not completely drain the breast so there should be some left for your daughter. If she is not growing then check with the dr or hospital for a reference to a lactation consultant.

Oh don't combine pumped milk if the pumping was more than two hours apart, and always combine milk when both containers are the same temp.

Bret - posted on 07/23/2012

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Really, really good advice here, thank you very much.

I'm going to suggest my wife pumps after feeding, she can put Nila in a milk coma, if she pumps after that any milk we get is just bonus.

I'd like to start freezing milk but we aren't even up to 4 oz in a bottle yet. My wife feels dehydrated a lot so I'll keep a water bottle in her hands as much as I can.

Thank you all so much for the advice!
Bret

Bernadette - posted on 07/22/2012

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I did the same thing a few times. I felt like if I did it after she fed, then I just couldn't get enough. But every time I decided to do it, just to have some to put away, she would wake up right after I'd finished and want to be fed so I'd have to give it to her. And most of the time she refused to take it out of a bottle anyway, so I just gave up and stopped pumping altogether. I thought exactly the same thing: why bother pumping, it's just a waste of time and energy to do something that isn't exactly pleasant, and for no reason.

Amanda - posted on 07/21/2012

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I agree with the others, pump AFTER she feeds Nila and don't be surprised at her nursing often. It is not only the nutrition she is seeking, she is looking for reassurance, comfort and bonding from Mom (her most familiar thing in this great big "new world" she's entered). Yes it can be exhausting; make sure to keep Kenyette well hydrated (at least 1/2 her weight in WATER a day) and eating (even stick snacks near her favorite chair). One thing that has helped several that I know is using a sling so that the baby can be held close while she (or you!!) are doing other things.

Hope this helps! Let us know!
Amanda Mckellevy

Julie - posted on 07/21/2012

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I tried pumping with my son and most of what I pumped got wasted or he didn't like it. My daughter was born with issues and needed formula until i could pump enough and after a few weeks she was off the bottle and we put the pump away for good. Pumping is great if you cant nurse directly or be with you baby, but it sucks, in more ways than one. Don't do it if you don't have to.

Jenny - posted on 07/19/2012

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I had a friend who did the same thing but her reasoning had to do with very sore nipples. The pump wasn't nearly as painful as actual breastfeeding and when she they got better, she started breastfeeding again. Also, your wife may be more comfortable knowing exactly how much your daughter is getting at each feeding. However, I agree with some of the others on here, if she wants some sleep or some freedom she should start pumping right after feeding your daughter so that she can start building up a supply of breastmilk.

Jenny - posted on 07/19/2012

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I had a friend who did the same thing but her reasoning had to do with very sore nipples. The pump wasn't nearly as painful as actual breastfeeding and when she they got better, she started breastfeeding again. Also, your wife may be more comfortable knowing exactly how much your daughter is getting at each feeding. However, I agree with some of the others on here, if she wants some sleep or some freedom she should start pumping right after feeding your daughter so that she can start building up a supply of breastmilk.

Roxi80mb - posted on 07/19/2012

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I pumped and gave it to my DD at the very beginning. my maternal nurse was already advising me to think of suplementing with formula because my DD lost too much weight in the first few days. she was latching correctly but it didnt look like I had much milk at all.I would have her finish a feed , wait about 15-30 min and than try to pump. it was exhausting!!! luckily I didnt do it for too long. My supply increased fast and my DD was putting on more than enough . at night time i would feed her laying in bed next to her so we would pretty much both be sleeping through the feed. I was a SAHM too so i was happy to let her nurse as long as she wanted as often as she needed. she never had any formula after all.A... and yes, make sure she eats enough and drinks lots of water. i was so weak after giving birth and just didnt feel like eating...is when I started eating properly I noticed my supply increasing

Heather - posted on 07/19/2012

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I don't know. I don't start pumping until my kiddos have their first growth spurt and my breasts are way over full because the baby nurses non-stop. Advice is also not to give new babies a bottle until they are 4 to 6 weeks old. My daughter is 2 1/2 weeks old. Pumping will NOT empty her breasts like a newborn baby WILL! Even though she's pumping off probably 2 to 4 oz., her breasts aren't empty.

If your wife is pumping, and then SHE is feeding your daughter a bottle, it's honestly not rest for her at all. That's weird. You should be giving your daughter the bottle of pumped BM, not her.

Pumping, and then feeding it back to your daughter, is serving NO purpose, at all. I agree with you, this is coming from a nursing mother of a 2 1/2 week old daughter, my third child.

Lori - posted on 07/19/2012

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Pumping does a couple of things. Yes it allows for her to rest or do something without having to worry. But it also helps her body to produce more. However if this is her goal, she should nurse your daughter first completely then pump immediately afterwards. Your daughter will be fully fed, pumping will completely empty her breasts, and help produce more. Also allowing some time before your daughters next feeding for your wife's body to produce more. I never pumped with my oldest. I had to stop nursing at 6 months because my milk dried up. I did pump with my other 2 kids. I had a great supply with my 2nd (that is until I got prgnant with my 3rd at 8 months). I pûmped every day regiliously, am very thankful that I did. I had to use it when I got sick and my supply dwindled for a bit, and when my son was 10 months old and my supply stopped because of being pregnant. I had enough stored in the freezer to feed him until he was 1. It is a great thing to do. Your wife can get sleep if needed, go out without worrying, for later consumption, like when your daughter is starting cereal (I used breast milk instead of water). Just remember though she should be doing it after she feeds. Good luck and congrats!

Donelle - posted on 07/18/2012

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My sister did the pumping thing when her son was newborn. She did it because she didn't like breastfeeding but wanted her son to get breastmilk, however over a couple weeks of only pumping her milk started to dry up and after a few weeks her son was on formula. I exclusively breastfed both my boys and hardly pumped because I didn't like wasting time pumping when nursing was so much easier. Plus pumping didn't give my boys half as much milk as strictly nursing them.

Amy - posted on 07/18/2012

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I knew I was returning to work so I introduced a bottle early, however I never gave my daughter a bottle! I didn't want her to think it was an option to get a bottle from me, I would never have wasted my time pumping to turn around and give a bottle I would of just feed her. I only pumped in the middle of the night if I woke up feeling engorged or I would feed her off of one side in the morning and then pump the other side. I hated pumping so much that when I did return to work I would dream feed before I left in the morning, or dream feed if I got home after she was asleep at night.

What are her reasons for pumping? You say you've asked her maybe if we knew we could give you valid pointers to help you in convincing her to not pump at all.

Alecia - posted on 07/18/2012

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I was a pump and nursing mom for a year! After I had my son in the hospital, he had to stay longer than I did because he had jaundice, and I pumped while I was away from him so my milk would come in. When I went back to the hospital to nurse him, I pumped periodically because I was worried he was not getting enough milk. My son was given formula while in the nursery because they needed him to have bowel movements often in order to decrease his bilirubin levels. They needed him to take in a certain amount of ounces and they advised me to wait to nurse him exclusively once I produced a steady amount of milk. While I was pumping in the hospital, one of the NICU doctors advised me not to pump because it would cause latching problems, but I wanted to know how much I was producing so his jaundice would get better. When we finally got home, I had no trouble with him latching and he never seemed to notice that he had had formula either. After about 4 weeks, though, he began to nurse for 50 minutes on each side and I was exhausted. I began to pump at night for 20 minutes on each side and had my husband feed our son a bottle of breastmilk just so we could get some sleep. Again, I never had a problem with him latching the next day. Honestly, I wanted to get the hang of the pump before I went back to work and I wanted to make sure my son would take a bottle once a day for when my maternity leave was over. Most of the time pumping and feeding is not as advised as nursing exclusively, but it takes about the same amount of time and some women are more comfortable with this when they go to visit family or leave the house with a newborn. Hopefully all goes well and Nila will latch whenever she needs to!

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