small breast concerned about nursing

Shannon - posted on 12/24/2009 ( 64 moms have responded )

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I am 38 weeks pregnant and we have a planned induction on Tuesday. before my pregnancy i wore a 36A bra, now I wear a 38B. My chest size how grown but my cup size is still an A, they don't sell 38A bras. I am concerned that I wont be able to produce enough milk to nurse because of having a small chest. Anyone have/had this problem?

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Jaime - posted on 12/27/2009

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First things, I am sorry that you have to have a planned induction, and
I hope everything goes well! Second, your chest size has nothing to do with your milk production. You will do fine. Just remember, formula is your worst enemy, so stay away from in when possible. My boys got formula when they were born, because they were hypoglycemic (big babies). Don't let anyone tell you that you cant do it! Prevent your milk supply from going down, by not giving baby a bottle unless you absolutely have to (as in pumped milk, just feed him from your breast whenever you can). If he gets sick, keep your supply up by pumping a little, so that when he gets his appetite back you will have enough, and work through the teething stages.

Your body is ment to do this, and you are very very capable. The only reason that all those mothers out there have problems, is because they are either misimformed, underinformed, unsupported, or undermotivated.

Here is a great website, and good luck!!!

http://www.nbci.ca/index.php?option=com_...

Sophie - posted on 12/26/2009

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It doesnt matter what size your boobs are the ducts are far back in your body. Your body can and will produce enough milk for your baby just make sure you demand feed at the beginning and let your baby suckle as often as possible to estavlish your supply and dont give a bottle (of expressed milk) or dummy until you are happy that your supply is established

Amber - posted on 12/26/2009

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Breast size has no barring on the ability to breastfeed. It is actually rare that a woman cannot successfully breastfeed and it is usually due to medical reasons..
I was a small chest size before pregnancy, during and after.. my breasts never even increased in size while producing milk.. I breastfed my first for over a year.. I am at a year with my second child.. Don't worry to much!!

[deleted account]

Don't worry! Breast size in no way relates to milk production, I'm sure you will be fine. The fact that they have grown shoes they are getting ready! I'd be more concerned about having an induction and how that might affect your birth if you have to use alot of pain drugs. Ask some friends or family to come and cook etc for those first couple of weeks to allow you to focus on your baby and getting your breastfeeding relationship off to a great start. Good luck!

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Bobie - posted on 01/03/2010

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my breasts are even smaller than yours & im exclusively breastfeeding for 5mos now...running 6.not bad for a first-time mom,huh?! when i was pregnant i got all sorts of remarks about how im gona bf my son when i have such small breasts & i just get infuriated inside & jst had to bite my tongue from saying how ignorant they are! milk production is not based on breast size.what makes a breast big/small is its underlying adipose tissue.& for sure milk doesnt come frm the fat tissues in ur breast.

bf needs a LOT of patience & perseverance...dont give up if u dont have milk after a couple of days..keep trying!! the more the baby sucks on ur breasts,the more it will stimulate milk production. i wasnt able to produce milk till like a wk after giving birth & though it hurt like hell, i was very happy that at last i am making milk.. if d baby is not getting enough from u, & ur thinking of mixing with formula, alwys always give him ur breast first before the formula. my nurse at the hospital taught me to do that & squeeze a little colustrum/milk from ur breast into the formula b4 giving it to baby.she also gave the formula in a tiny cup. when i got home, i tried to give him the bottle when he seems to be not getting enough from me but thank God he didnt get "nipple-confused" & he has even given up on bottles entirely on his own...

so dont give up!! hopefully by now,ur producing milk already!! congrats & goodluck!

Lorna - posted on 01/03/2010

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The more you nurse the more milk you produce. I have been nursing for 2,5 years and my breasts have been back to their usual B-size for more than a year and still producing enough to feed at least 2 babies. A lot of people give up in the first 2 weeks of feeding (and start feeding less and less - thus producing less and less) because it is often very painful, but if you persevere the nipples get tough.



Enjou every moment on Tuesday!

[deleted account]

I was an A cup before my first and stayed there until 3 days after I gave birth. When my milk came in I got up to a C cup and nursed baby #1 until 1year-no formula ever and baby #2 for 1.5 years-I even injured my left side and only nursed with my right from 3 months onwards. So only one small boob fed my 95th%ile baby until well after a year. Good luck, you'll do fine. It's not always easy so be confident that your body wad meant to do this.

Shannon - posted on 12/31/2009

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Sounds like you are feeling inadequate. Trust your body. Our bodies are amazing and somehow seems to know exactly what to do:)

Dawn - posted on 12/31/2009

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You will have enough milk! Size of boob is unrelated to ability to breastfeed!!!!!

Enjoy your child and I hope everything goes well for both of you.

dxx

Felicia - posted on 12/31/2009

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I was an A my whole life and all through my pregnancy, and the first month after he was born I went into a B. I have had no problem producing enough milk for my baby boy. Around 3 weeks my supply went down, but it is natural. Your body adjusts to produce the ammount your baby needs, so don't worry. I'm sure you wil be fine. :D

Also, if after a few weeks you find your supply decreases and you worry, you can use take Fenugreek. It works SO WELL!!!!!! You can get the capsules at any vitamin store and just take it 3 times a day. :D

Ryanne - posted on 12/30/2009

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I am smaller than you and have breastfed all three of my children. In fact, I'm still breastfeeding my 15 month old. Size DOES NOT matter. The only thing that will throw you for a loop is when your milk comes in (3-4 days after birth) your breasts will be huge. Then after your body settles down (after a couple of months) you won't even know if you have milk in your breasts anymore because they will be small again--all the time. Just remember, you will still have enough milk, even if it doesn't feel like it. Our bodies change to give our babies the right kind of milk at the right time in their lives. The milk ducts that produce the milk will also be deeper in your chest than they were at first, so you won't be able to feel them as well when they fill with milk.

Women were made to breastfeed. Let the process work and trust your body.

Angela - posted on 12/30/2009

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I was told that size doesn't matter. Its the size of your glands and your ability to produce milk that matters most. You should just try a wait and see approach. If you can breastfeed you will, it you can't you won't!

Katy-louise - posted on 12/30/2009

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it doesnt matter how big they are all boobs produce enough its your ody that takes over and they useually grow once youve given birth anyway x

Michelle - posted on 12/29/2009

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I didn't have this problem, but I have read in many books that breast size DOES NOT have any effect in breastfeeding. Breasts are made of fatty tissues and larger breasts just have more fatty tissue than smaller breasts which has no effect on how much milk you will be able to produce. You'll know your baby is getting enough milk if he/she is gaining weight and is happy. Good luck and congrats!

Barb - posted on 12/29/2009

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Hi I had 34A size breasts before my son was born. I am now a D cup, and out of all the mothers in my mothers group, I have had the most sucess with breastfeeding. I thought that my breast were only 'snack size' but I produce a huge amount of milk! Best of luck, breastfeeding is wonderful!

Angie - posted on 12/28/2009

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My midwives say every breast size works for breast feeding. You will find after the baby is born you may grow a bit, and most likely be able to nurse. I wouldn't put a lot of energy into worrying about this, enjoy your upcoming labor and trust that your body will do what it needs to.
Good luck.
Angie

Meagan - posted on 12/28/2009

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fellow a cupper! im preg #2 guess ill give bf a shot this time around, but ill b the one to tell u with my 1st i really wanted to bf but the milk didnt come in the dr insisted on supplement because of weight loss on day 2...i did bf & supplement for 6 weeks but was one of the hardest things i ever did. my nipples actually bled n bruised n the dr urged get baby a nuke bc it was literally sucking me dry...now i moved the day i got out of the hospital and was shocked by my flappy tummy i dont think i was eating enuf and had alot of stress so im gonna give it a shot this time since im settled in with a supportive partner but i wish i would have thought more about options the first time, i didnt have bottles or anything so this time around im gonna play it safe and have gear for both, just dont stress or feel bad if it doesnt happen.i bonded just as good as ne parent w my baby shes in great health and smart as they come, plus she weaned by her 1st bday!

Ashley - posted on 12/28/2009

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i had 34A before becoming pregnant. your chest will grow to accommodate milk and you will have plenty. now, i wear a size 34C. i would get some nursing bras. and dont worry about not being able to produce enough milk, your body will produce as much as needed. good luck!

Jennifer - posted on 12/28/2009

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breast tissue has nothing to do with milk production. You could have a man's chest and as long as you had milk ducts you could produce milk.

the best piece of advice I have is Make sure you get ahold of a lactation consultant ASAP after having that baby. They normally are located right at the hospital and will come to your room and help you before you leave.

Samantha - posted on 12/28/2009

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I'm very small-chested, and it wasn't a problem for me to produce enough milk for my daughter. Size does't affect milk amount, but rather, how often you have your baby on the breast. Good luck, and enjoy your new bundle of joy!

Ronda - posted on 12/28/2009

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I had a small chest as well before but it did not affect nursing my daughter at all. Over time your chest will still grow. I was a 36B and am now a 38D. Crazy i know, its amazing all the changes that happen from pregnancy and nursing.

Ashley - posted on 12/28/2009

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One of my best friends has the tiniest lil boobies you could possibly imagine. She breastfed 2 out of 3 of her babies with no troubles. the key is plenty of fluids, avoid caffeine in the beginning, eat a well balanced diet, don't smoke and nurse often. I am sure you will have plenty of milk for you wee one.

Carrie - posted on 12/28/2009

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The size of your chest doesn't matter what-so-ever, sweetie! I know how worried you are about breastfeeding, because that was my one and only concern during my entire pregnancy. Fortunately, my baby boy is over 6 months old and has been breast-fed exclusively the entire time! I will tell you that it can be quite difficult in the beginning. You will be really tired, your breasts may get extremely sore, and it will take some time for both you and baby to get into the "groove." I don't know the specifics of your area and hospital, but after you deliver make sure you ask to see the lactation specialist! They are super helpful while you're in the hospital, and may also have appointments available afterward in case you need further help. Just HANG IN THERE! The pay-off is SO worth it! Please, let me know if you have any questions! Breast-feeding is something I am so passionate about because of its benefits for you and for baby!
Good luck!! =)

Megan - posted on 12/28/2009

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I know of four mothers with REALLY small breasts tha nursed their children well into toddlerhood without and formula! Your breast size has absolutely NOTHING to do with how much milk you make :) Hope you have a happy birth! Congratulations!

Rebekah - posted on 12/28/2009

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Your milk will not come in until a few days after you've given birth, so your pregnancy cup size doesn't mean anything. I was a "nearly A" all during my pregnancy and wasn't a B cup until my milk came in about 4 days after my daughter's birth. I'm still not very big, but I've been successfully nursing my daughter exclusively for 7 months.

Amber - posted on 12/28/2009

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Le Lecha League International or LLLI. Is for breast feeding moms and their babes. They are the most experienced, up to date group on breastfeeding. Any questions or concerns they can help you with.
I have believe it or not 38K size breasts! No one ever believes me when I tell them that, but it's true. Everyone told me I'd have no problem making milk. Well then my son was born, I like to think I was 'educated' in all things baby, I read ALL the books, took all the classes, talked to anyone who had children. Connor was born at five pounds nine ounces, he never lost any weight-there wasn't anything to lose, the doctors told me it was because he failed to thrive in the last trimester. He was in the NICU for four days. this is when he should have been getting my colostrum, or pre milk full of great and wonderful stuff that baby really needs. I pumped every two hours like thet told me to, I only got a few drops which is very upsetting {that's what you're supposed to get, no one told me}. When I wan allowed to nurse my son I had to write down how long he nursed at each breast, I never could remember to do this and so the nurses gave him formula. I got in the habit of supplementing his meals with formula or skipping nursing all together and giving him a bottle. By ten months he was weaned, and I was broken heartened. The thing about nursing is that it's all supply and demand, the amount your baby demands is the amount your breast will make. Period, that's the way it works. Even one bottle feeding, {breast milk or formula} can throw the whole cycle off. If your baby doesn't stimulate your breast by sucking, then your breasts start to make less and then less milk. It's a vicious cycle, and one that is very difficult to reverse, although not impossible. Put your baby to your breast when ever he's hungry, even if it's all day long at first, and your breast will make the milk. There are a SMALL percentage of women who have incurable problem with breast feeding, usually a surgery on the breast tissue that diminishes the milk making tissue. If you find that your having troubles get in touch with the LLLI.org {breastfeeding help). They can and will answer all your questions and help you with any issues. If you want to above anything else, breast feed your child then do whatever you have to. It's such a short time that they're this age, and 'this too shall pass' as they say.

Sharon - posted on 12/27/2009

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Size really doesn't matter.Like you, I was worried that my small breasts wouldn't be able to produce milk. I was AA before pregnancy, and am now a full A. I've been breastfeeding my daughter for the past 9-10 months, and supply hasn't been an issue.



I think what's more important is to latch your bb on demand from birth so as to build up your supply. And yup, newborns have v small stomachs, so even the little colostrum that you have the first few days is enough for your bb.

Melissa - posted on 12/27/2009

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It won't matter. I have small breasts and had no problem nursing either of my kids for a year. Your body produces what the baby needs. If you have problems, see a lactation consultant ASAP. They can make a world of a difference in helping making sure the baby is latched on correctly (or else you will be in a world of pain) and helping with suggestions to bring in your milk better. Just make sure that if your OBGYN puts you on a birth control method (at 6 wks), that you only take a progesterone only BC pill. A regular BC pill will reduce your milk production and you won't be able to get it back.

Mitzi - posted on 12/27/2009

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I was a 34 A to a 36 C Don't worry your body will produce all the milk your baby needs. For the first few days you might just have Colostrum and the baby will get full of of that. The first 24 hours of the baby's life their stomach is a size of a marble and after 2-3 days it's a size of a walnut. So you will have enough milk don't let anyone tell you otherwise.

Ashley - posted on 12/27/2009

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You should be just fine. but remember to pump too! its easier to start your baby on solids like rice and oatmeal when you mix it with you breast milk. they take it better because it has your taste. pump between feedings to ensure that you have an abundant supply not only what he needs. a friend of mine didn't pump so when she went back to work while her daughter was sick and tried pumping and feeding her supply dried up and now she has to use the bottle. (i don't know if she was doing it right though) but the biggest thing is it is far easier to keep up a supply then trying to build it up when he is ready to start on the solids or when you go back to work. and it is absolutely the best thing at night when they wake in the middle to just have to get them and let them latch on then have to get up, go to the kitchen warm up a bottle then sit there and hold a bottle while trying to stay awake! God sure did know what he was doing when he gave us these things! relax mama and enjoy the bond it is truly the best!

Elanor - posted on 12/27/2009

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Quoting maggie:

The best advice i ever got was to start pumping right away!!!!



 






although this lady had no problem, pumping really is not the best thing at all!!!!



I AM A BREASTFEEDING ADVISOR, so I do know what I'm saying, pumps are more likely to make you sore. Babies are genetcally designed to suckle, as long as latch is correct, baby should as often as they want.

Lindsay - posted on 12/27/2009

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Breast size pre-nursing has nothing to do w/ milk supply. I had a nearly B before nursing. I produce more milk than my DD friend who's baby is the exact same age as mine. I have gone up to a D cup myself.

Karla - posted on 12/27/2009

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haha! Just wait til you have the baby! They will get so engorged with milk, you will surely no longer be an A cup!

Shannyn - posted on 12/27/2009

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Breast size has nothing to do with milk production. Relax and stand by your choice to breast feed. Your body will make the milk your baby needs- as long as you nurse when the baby needs to. I was/am LARGE, I was falling out of a H while nursing my Daughter, a kinda funny concern was "where's the baby's head" when she pulled my shirt over her face, lol. Be confident and know that your breast size will not limit your milk supply :)

Sarah - posted on 12/27/2009

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Breast size has nothing to do with production of milk. God made our breasts, all sizes and shapes, to produce milk for our babies. Rest at ease! :)

Pat - posted on 12/27/2009

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Don't Panic! You're not the only one out there. I was an A too and didn't even notice any difference before my delivery. It was only after the delivery, when the milk came in that there was a marked difference. I suddenly had breasts!!!!! But breast size doesn't detemine the amount of milk, in fact I do know of many women with big breasts who couldn't produce enough milk. If you are worried about your milk supply, start on Fenugreek. I did and have been breastfeeding since my little girl was born and she's now 14 months old and still being breast fed. So all's good, the only bad thing is that, I'm now back down to an A cup again :(

Erica - posted on 12/26/2009

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It doesn't matter what size your boobs are but here are a few tips to increase your milk supply:

-feed on demand during the first weeks and if you can manage, pump once or twice a day after a feeding or two (this will also come in handy if you plan on going back to work or just having a night out)
-drink LOTS of water and eat whenever you're hungry, there is no reason to diet if you're breastfeeding - it uses plenty of calories :)
-get as much rest as possible, you'll produce more milk and your baby will feed easier when you're relaxed and rested
-stay away from caffeine and carbonated fluids, it decreases breast milk and affects your ability to absorb iron (important to me b/c I was anemic after my c-section)

Also, just set your mind to it and you can do it. Breastfeeding can be a lot of work but if you want to do it, you can! Good luck!

[deleted account]

I have the same size chest as you and I actually produced way too much milk for the first 3 months! Breast size has nothing to do with it. My now 5 month old son is exclusively breastfed and we have no problems at all. It's a myth... I had friends who commented that I may not be able to breastfeed because of my chest size I told them that was the dumbest thing I had ever heard.

Leticia - posted on 12/26/2009

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I was/am small too Your cup size has nothing to do with the amount of milk you will be able to produce. After you get your milk in completely usually your size goes up a bit, but it really depends on how often the baby nurses. With my son i went from a 34B to a 38C, and with my daughter i didn't really go up too much (still nursing at 11 1/2 mons) so i asked the doc and they said it had to do with how often i nursed them. You'll be fine and be able to nurse perfectlly fine most likely

Melissa - posted on 12/26/2009

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size REALLY doesnt matter when it comes to b/f!!!! if Kelly Rippa breastfed 3 children, so can you! lol

Carolyn - posted on 12/26/2009

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No matter what your breat size, your breasts will produce the milk for your baby. :) Make sure you have your baby latch onto your breast ASAP after birth and keep the baby there when s/he cries. The suckling is what stimulates milk production. The nurses can help you with latch on as well.

[deleted account]

Don't worry how big they are. The fact is that you are pregnant and there are hormones that support your pregnancy and breastfeeding, you just have to believe in yourself then you will have no problems.

They will get bigger once the milk comes in a few days after the birth. I have small breasts, both before and after having babies. I was normally an Acup, went to a B after our first child then back to a very small A then when pregnant with #2, went to a C cup then to a full C when the milk came in. Now I'm back to my original size but with a deflated shape to my breasts.

I would suggest going to a specialised bra shop as they usually have equivalent sizing for bras if they don't make the 38A that you are looking for. 38B may not be the right equivalent to 38A.

Alyson - posted on 12/26/2009

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Thats what size i was, and mine only got slightly bigger durring pregnancy, not enough to up bra sizes...and i wasnt making enough milk...and tryed everything to get more to come in and nothing worked!!...I have milk, but not enough....but i heard that size doesnt matter...its the shape. You should look up ( Hypoplastic Breasts )

Ashley - posted on 12/26/2009

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breast size has nothing to do with your ability to produce milk. you should be just fine!

Cristina - posted on 12/26/2009

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Breast size has nothing to do with how much milk you'll produce.

I'm normally (non-pregnant & non-breastfeeding) a 34 B, and that's on a good day!

During pregnancy, my breasts didn't really grow too much and now, 7 months into breastfeeding I'm probably a cup size bigger when I'm full and back down to my normal size once I've fed my boy.

My neighbor is also small-chested and she's still happily breastfeeding her 10-month-old daughter. So, I guess she and I both dispel the rumors that you need to have huge breasts to breastfeed.

Good luck!

Andrea - posted on 12/26/2009

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I haven't read all of the replies- but I'm hoping people told you not to worry!! It's pretty rare to not be able to produce enough milk & it has nothing to do with your breast size. I was an A cup before having a baby. I had plenty of milk. I have a friend who is an H (!!!!) & she had to work to produce enough for her 1st baby (who later nursed successfully until almost 2). It's not about your breast size. You'll do great!

(Oh- and in case you haven't done much reading or taken a class, it does take a few days for your milk to totally come in. It doesn't mean you're not producing enough!)

Johnny - posted on 12/26/2009

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Breast size in no way equals supply. My enormous ones have always struggled to make enough for my daughter. Breast size is usually related to fat tissue, most breasts have approximately similar amounts of milk ducts, no matter what size.

Natalie - posted on 12/26/2009

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You'll do just fine! If you can, get to a la leche meeting - the leaders can check your baby's latch and address any concerns you have. Breastfeeding can be stressful at first and a good support system will help calms your fears. My biggest suggestion as far as having enough milk is to feed you baby on demand. This will help your milk come and and will ensure that your baby is getting enough.

Laura - posted on 12/26/2009

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Breast size has nothing to do with your milk. I was told it would but I had twins for my first pregnancy and exclusively breasfed them for 18 months. My Breast are not all the big I went from a B cup to C cup. I could not believe how many people told me I would not be able to exclusively breast feed twins because I would never have enough milk! I even had health care professionals tell me that !!!! Its BS!! Every pregnancy is different and every time you breast feed is different! I'm sure you will be just fine!!! :)
I have also been exclusively breastfeeding my almost 10 month old! Good Luck!!

Nicole - posted on 12/26/2009

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size has nothing to do with milk production. I was a 32 A for half my pregnancy then got up to a whopping 34 A at nine months. Now it is a game of roulette what size they will be one day to the next. The other day, one was an A and the other was about a C. a lot of women don't experience a ton of size change until after baby is born and milk comes in (which can be up to a week after birth). I put that in because a lot of folks jump the gun and give formula because the "real milk" is not in, when in fact the clostrum is all that is needed.

Mattee - posted on 12/26/2009

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My boobs grew 2 cup sizes when my milk came in, growing 4 total since pre preg. I started a 34B and am 36E now. I don't think size has anything to do with it. The boobs know what their job is, lol

Danielle - posted on 12/26/2009

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Happy Holidays Shannon! Those were my sizes as well and I breast fed my son until he was 19 months. He is six now and has been pretty much a very healthy little boy. You can do it!

Nicole - posted on 12/26/2009

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I just want to thank you for posting this question. :) I have.. or had, before reading the replies.. the same worry as you. I was tinier than an A (I often joked that I was an inverted A because they were so tiny). Finally, at 25 weeks they've started to grow. But not by much. I'm almost a B now. I'm glad to hear that it shouldn't hinder me breastfeeding! Thanks! **hugs**

Elanor - posted on 12/26/2009

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I wouldn't worry about that! Milk is produced in spite of your breast size. It is all about supply and demand. As long as you let baby have the breast when baby wants the breast, you will produce enough milk. If the latch isn't correct this can cause engorgement so make sure you have lots of info, and support. Drugs in birth (and induction) can affect supply, so be weary about what you have and even if you HAVE to be induced (my baby was 2 weeks overdue - I didn't want to be induced and he was fine).
In the old days they used to say that small breasts cannot produce milk, we obviously know this not to be fact now, as it's about the milk glands not fat. Infact flatter chested women may even have it easier as,if you are too big baby can find it difficult to cope with.

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