tongue-tied

Andrea - posted on 11/13/2008 ( 20 moms have responded )

4

0

0

my son is 16 days old and is tongue-tied...we're considering clipping it...any advice?

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Jenny - posted on 11/14/2008

3

0

0

I have a 9 year old and an 8 month old both with tongue tie. They've never had an trouble talking or eating (not that our 8 month old talks) but we don't see any reason to have it clipped. Why fix something that isn't broken?

Sarah - posted on 02/06/2009

8

17

0

My son is tongue tied. He's 8 months old and we are having it clipped next week by an ENT. He will be put under general anesthesia for the procedure. I have researched this topic EXTENSIVELY, talked to my pediatrician, received a second opinion from another pediatrician, talked to our dentist, and then to the ENT and my ped. said don't do it and the rest recommended clipping it. We had some minor problems w/ latching on but have no problems now. In a lot of tt kids it never causes problems, BUT, it CAN cause speech and dental problems and I would rather not chance it. So we are having it clipped on Feb. 19th.

Carrie - posted on 11/19/2008

31

24

6

I have never dealt with this as a mother, but as a teacher I have seen many parents who regretted not doing it.

Rachael - posted on 11/19/2008

2

18

0

If your not having trouble nursing then leave it be. I have 6 children and some are tongue tied. I clipped my first son after struggling for 11 weeks. However, guess what? He still has speech issues. My last two speech teachers (3 out of 6 go regularly for pronunciation) have told us that tongue tied doesn't mean anything. The one clipped still goes to speech, the two unclipped don't need speech. Go figure. If it's not bothering him, then don't worry about it. Though if you do do it, it will bother you more than him:) It wasn't bad for him at all and did fix his latch. good luck

Andrea - posted on 11/19/2008

4

0

0

thanks for the responses...
my son has trouble latching on and my nipples are paying the price!
also, he got his tongue-tie issue from me...i had mine clipped at 8 years old because of speech problems
after talking with our doctor and a lactation consultant, we've decided to do it...i'll post after it's been done

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

20 Comments

View replies by

Allira - posted on 02/06/2009

1

9

0

i have an 18mth old who is tongue tied, he had no problems attaching to the breast, and he is now starting to talk and is doin reallly well, if ur son is attaching well why bother, i'd wait and see wat happens.

Jillian - posted on 02/06/2009

15

18

0

i think i'll add to my comment. my little girl is 7 months now and i think she had actually cut it on her own. this past week she has been playing with her tongue a lot, and i have been amazed at how far she can stick it out. I think that if you give it time the same thing could happen. and unless it is super severe i wouldn't get it cut.

Jillian - posted on 02/06/2009

15

18

0

My little girl is tongue tied also. it was a little tough in the beginning with nursing because she sucked in so much air and it caused her to be colicly. but once she passed 2 months old she was fine. i actually wanted to have her tongue clipped but my pediatrician said it wasn't as big deal and not to worry. hey but if you get it done, tell us how it went!

Renee - posted on 02/06/2009

93

18

22

Quoting Sarah:

My son is tongue tied. He's 8 months old and we are having it clipped next week by an ENT. He will be put under general anesthesia for the procedure. 


He has to be under GENERAL for the procedure? Wow, that seems extreme!  My baby's frenulum was clipped at 2 weeks old and it was a VERY quick, painless procedure (I cried way more than he did) in a clinic visit. Did the docs say that the skin is that much more difficult to cut at 8 mos and that's why they have to put him under general anesthesia? 



Clipping my baby's frenulum was the best thing we could have done. His latching problems improved within 2 days and my blisters finally healed. We've been able to nurse for 9 months, when at the beginning I thought it would only be 9 days!

Misty - posted on 11/20/2008

7

7

4

I had my daughter's clipped because it was extremely painful to nurse her. I had large blisters all over my nipples and that was just from nursing for 24 hours. There was only a drop of blood and then all was fine. She's my second child so I knew there was something wrong.

Alyssa - posted on 11/19/2008

76

13

14

we had this done in my son's first month to try to make breastfeeding easier. the doctors said his tongue-tie wasn't severe, and it would likely stretch with age, but having the clip could make our breastfeeding problems go away. if it didn't help, he'd be no worse off than before.

the ENT doctor gave him a little topical under his tongue with a q-tip and "clip!" it was over. he nursed as soon as we got home and the result was just as we'd hoped - breastfeeding issues were gone!

he'd had such trouble feeding prior to the clip that we'd had to supplement w/ formula so he'd gain weight. with in a week we were off formula and totally breastfed... and have been ever since (well... we started solids recently, but otherwise...).



good luck!

DD - posted on 11/19/2008

132

10

15

Please do as it's not completely a no way for us...we'll still leave that door open. He's still pretty tied, and I expect speech problems.
Thanks and good luck! Here's wishing an easy procedure :)

Tricia - posted on 11/14/2008

18

2

1

As a lactation consultant I have seen babies with tongue tie. Many of the mothers have sore nipples, but not all. I have also seen some mothers who continued breastfeeding with no pain, but have a decreased milk supply after the first month or so due to baby's ineffective latch. I recommend you have a consultation with a physician who does this procedure and hear the pros and cons. Clipping a tongue tie is far easier in the first weeks or few months than it is later. The research does support clipping tongue tie to improve breastfeeding.

DD - posted on 11/14/2008

132

10

15

OH I also wanted to add, that the research I've done says that many children who are tongue tied stretch it themselves, or even accidentally cut it themselves later on. Most, in fact are stretched out by the time they talk.

DD - posted on 11/14/2008

132

10

15

My 2 month old is tongue tied. Oh how we deliberated over this. The reason we did not do it is because there were no latching problems. The LC consultant was all for it but 3 docs were against it, as well as the speech pathologist. We decided that since it was not hindering his latch, we'd not do it....we'd deal with the later...later. That being said, if there were any issues with nursing I would have done it no questions asked.

Jessa - posted on 11/14/2008

10

7

1

My son had a tongue tie and we had it clipped at two weeks because it was so incredibly painful for me to nurse him b/c he couldn't latch properly. It was a very, very minor procedure and after screaming for just a moment, James nursed and was easily comforted. I had postpartum depression because I was having such trouble nursing him, and this helped us tremendously. I was really scared about having it done, but it was fast, compassionate, easy, and healed very quickly. I know it is hard to imagine doing to your baby, but if he is having trouble nursing because of it, then it might be very helpful.

Luci - posted on 11/14/2008

21

41

7

ditto the message from Jenny PD...my 1st had no problems nursing & was an early talker, I'd only do it if the tie is causing a problem

Emily - posted on 11/14/2008

25

21

3

I work as a dental hygienist and can tell you that unless the tongue tie is very severe there is no research to support having it done. There has been no proven link to speach problems or requiring speech therapy as they age. Most adults who have it done view it more as a cosmetic surgery. They simply don't like the look or are self concious about it. If the tie is very strong, then consider the surgery. Otherwise I would leave it. It can be quite an uncomfortable procedure as the area is very sensitive (I tore a frenum once... ouch!) Hope that helps!

Jenny - posted on 11/14/2008

3

0

0

I should add,after reading this post from Catherine Bull, that I nursed all my first 3 kids for over a year and am still nursing my 4th. Never had any trouble with nursing. And as for speech dely - my 9 year old with tongue tie talked very early and my 3 year old without tongue tie talked very late.

[deleted account]

do it! there's a thread about this on a yahoo list. dozens of people responded saying the procedure is quick and no biggy. tied tongue can create breastfeeding problems and the need for speech therapy later. adults with the condition had it clipped as teens or young adults and wished it had been done when thhey were younger. it's called a frenotomy.

from the thread:
After numerous lactation consultations and 13 weeks using breast
shields, I finally had my son's tongue clipped. I'm glad I did it.
Jake cried for about 2 seconds when the doctor put the tissue with a
local on his tongue and quickly snipped his tongue. There literally
was one drop of blood and he was fine. No repercussions, no recovery
issues, no more tears with nursing and my son can lick from a cone
just fine.

Dr. O'Hara clipped my daughter's frenulum when she was a bit over three
months. We had gone to an ENT previously, who refused to do it. We
wanted it done for a few reasons -- (1) I had had mastitis 5 times; (2)
she was refusing a bottle even though I had gone back to work, and we
thought her tongue-tie might be related to that; and (3) my son is also
tongue tied and had delayed speech; and (4) socially, in adult life
(kissing, etc.), having a restricted frenulum gets in the way. It
wasn't very easy for Dr. O'Hara to clip it -- apparently my daughter's
frenulum was restricted in a way that made it difficult to access, so
it took a while, and she was upset not from the clipping but from
having the thing in her mouth that allowed access to the frenulum, and
being held down so she was absolutely still. It did bleeed, but I
understand this is unusual. And she didn't seem hurt afterwards -- it
was mostly traumatic because we had to hold her down. But despite all
that, I HIGHLY recommend having the procedure done. Your child's
spouse will appreciate it and thank you down the road. ;-)

I should add that our pediatrician was also against clipping, so I'm
not surprised no one mentioned it to you. My understanding is the
resistance is because it's "unnecessary surgery." Dr. O'Hara was the
only person we found who was open to the procedure (she said in her
experience it does have an effect on breastfeeding, bottlefeeding,
speech, and socially -- which were all of our concerns). But if you
ask tongue-tied adults if they wish they would have had the procedure
done when they were babies, I bet 99% of them would say yes.

Years ago, they used to automatically clip the frenulum in newborns,
right after they were born -- at least that is what I am told by my
uncle, who had it done as a newborn.

I tried replying earlier to this string but I don't think my message posted--apologies if I'm repeating myself. I had my tounge clipped a few years ago by my dentist, who assured me it would be no big deal. He was right. It was over in an instant, and I think my tounge felt a tiny bit sore that day, or just odd from being freed. I was glad I had it done.

wow. I never knew the name for that procedure. I too am slightly tongue
tied and was not 'diagnosed' until my mid-20's, even by my
orthodondists (criminals)!! who i saw, by the way, because of extensive
orthodontia requried due to my condition. head gear, braces, elastics,
retainers, tongue guards. years of misery and significant expense...
by all means, snip it now! give the kid a chance ;-)

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms