Tragedy as breastfeeding mother smothers baby after falling asleep on jet

Stephanie - posted on 12/01/2009 ( 45 moms have responded )

28

30

0

This is really sad.


"A mother accidentally smothered her baby daughter to death on a flight after she fell asleep while breastfeeding.
The four-week-old girl was travelling with her Egyptian mother from Washington DC to Kuwait when the tragedy occurred on November 24.
Crew on the United Airlines jet were alerted by the 29-year-old mother's screams.
A doctor travelling on the plane tried unsuccessfully to revive the baby.
The plane, which was over the Atlantic at 33,000ft, was diverted to London's Heathrow airport just before 10am, where police boarded.
The baby girl was rushed to Hillingdon Hospital, a spokesman told the Daily Mail.
However she was pronounced dead on arrival at 10.35am.
Three days later a post-mortem was performed on her at the Great Ormond St Hospital in London.
Police are still awaiting the results of that. In the meantime, the spokesman said, the death is being treated as 'unexplained'.
No arrests have been made in the tragic incident.
A police source told The Sun: 'This appears to be a tragic accident. The girl comes from a loving family.
'Her mum was going to Kuwait to show her to relatives.'
It is not known if the woman was travelling with anyone other than her child.
Officers from Scotland Yard's Child Abuse Investigation Team are now dealing with the incident.
The Association of Breastfeeding Mothers said: 'Sitting up in bed while holding your baby is very dangerous, especially if you fall asleep.'

In 2004, Briton Lisa Briggs smothered her baby as they slept less than three years after losing another child to a similar tragedy.
Miss Briggs, 23, fell asleep while feeding five-week-old Keitha and woke in the morning to find her lifeless by her side.
Miss Briggs had lost her four-week-old daughter Cerese in identical circumstances.
However the Royal College of Midwives said in 2006 there are some benefits for breastfeeding mothers to share a bed with their babies, and a blanket message advising them not to do it could be counter-productive.
Melanie Every, a regional manager for the Royal College, said: 'We know that there are many, many cultures and many, many women who will continue to share beds with their babies, even when they are advised not to do it.
'Now, knowing that, it's important to give them advice on the safest possible way of doing it, rather than just saying don't do it.'
Babies can die of suffocation when their airways are obstructed by lying against their mother - a phenomenon known as 'overlying'."


See now this is the very thing I worry about. My son is 6 weeks old and im scared to death about smothering him at night. Has anyone got any advice about breastfeeding in the night like staying wake and other tips etc..... i cant seem to stay awake when breastfeeding him... and that really scares me. Its so frustrating.

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Karyn - posted on 12/04/2009

4

1

0

I cosleep with my son and have since the day he came home. He's ow almost 4 months old. I breastfeed while lying on my side in bed and we both fall asleep during the feeding almost every time. I've never worried about smothering him or hurting him because I believe I just instinctually know he's there. Cosleeping isn't for everyone but it's been a great bonding tool

Catherine - posted on 12/05/2009

1

14

0

I felt the same way and purchused a breastpump and started expressing because i was completely exhusted and found my self blacking out during feeds.. its not ideal but it worked.
the only other thing i can think of is get up and move some where suspefic for nighttime feeds so your not in bed go feed in front of the tv or something your brain have something to focus on.

Minnie - posted on 12/01/2009

7,076

9

786

Lie down in bed with your baby and nurse him. You'll likely get better sleep.



There are NO documented cases of an infant dying as a result of a SAFE bedsharing situation.



To cosleep safely:



keep comforters and pillows away from baby

make sure there are no gaps that the baby can become entrapped in

do not take drugs that influence your awareness, or alcohol while bedsharing

you should not be excessively obese

a young infant should not sleep next to a toddler

one should not sleep on a couch with an infant

the pair should be breastfeeding

the mother should not be exhausted from sleep deprivation



Bedsharing has been the default sleeping arrangement for infants and their mothers for as long as humans have existed. You can't stay awake because nursing your baby releases the lovely soothing hormone oxytocin- which puts us into a nice relaxing dreamy mood. And it's supposed to be that way. Do it safely, get your rest, and provide the security your little one needs.



I have shared my bed with my second daughter since she was a newborn. She is 13 months old now- and not ONCE have I not been aware of her presence next to me. Much of the time she's been squashed right up next to me, nursing.

Hannah - posted on 12/05/2009

33

19

3

That is very scary and sad. I have nursed and coslept with my daughter since she came home, now she is 8 months. It only took my husband 2 months to rejoin us in the bed :) She sleeps on my arm, so I am very aware of her. It is the only way we get any rest. I'm not into that whole "crying it out" method. Do what is best for you and don't let others judge. Congratulations on your new baby!

Jessica - posted on 12/02/2009

256

7

27

I just wanted to throw in a couple of suggestions for new moms who may be reading this and wondering "omg am I a bad mom??" or "I toss and turn a lot in my sleep, so I can't bedshare/cosleep"... yes you can!! There are 'in bed' sleepers that go in the middle of the bed and have foam borders that seperate a sleeping area for baby (you can use a sleep positioner with these as well), there are specifically made cosleepers that will securely attach to the side of your bed that make it possible to simply 'scoot' baby and keep them from rolling out. You can also do this with most cribs (not the drop sides, but you shouldn't use those anyways... I'll see if I can't find the article but there was a story about how the bottoms 'seperate' and baby falls through and becomes trapped or gets fingers pinched in the moving parts) and a great way to super-secure it is to take any wheels off your bed - or at least put the brakes on them - and use the weight of your bed to pin the sleeper/crib against a wall, open side to your bed.

You don't have to be scared of nighttime breastfeeding. It's actually that 'fear' that will KEEP you from doing exactly what you're afraid of! Try the methods that myself and other moms have suggested. Something will work for you!

And yes, my hubby sleeps elsewhere, but he doesn't mind, so long as he gets to come back to our bed soon (our dd is 13 months) HAHA.

This conversation has been closed to further comments

45 Comments

View replies by

Theresa - posted on 12/05/2009

61

20

4

It really is scary, but I admit I've had a close call when it came to something happening. I know after the first time it almost happened, ever since I've been more aware that he's next to me. It doesn't work for some people, but for those that it does work for, it really is great bonding.

Mary - posted on 12/05/2009

2

10

0

What a terrible tragedy! I breasfed my 1st born and I am breastfeeding my son. I have the same worry. I have woken up to find him with his airway being obstructed. It's such a terrible feeling to think "what if I didn't wake up on time". Now I try to dress him in warm jammies & dont use the comforter to cover him. I have him in a snnuggie of his own or blanket. I hope this helps some.

Jennifer - posted on 12/04/2009

22

6

0

Wow that is so sad. I would feel really sleepy at first but before I feed my daughter I get up out of the bed for a few minutes and I turn on the light and tv then I just sit up and feed her. It helped me alot!

Jessica - posted on 12/04/2009

256

7

27

Quoting Donna:

I don't get how she smothered her baby while sitting in the "super comfy" plane seat! I've often fallen asleep sitting in a chair while feeding my babies. It's not often that I DON'T nod off! Not once have I even got close to smothering a baby.

At night the easiest thing to do is co-sleep. How on earth did that mother smother TWO babies while co-sleeping? I don't know about anyone else, but I don't tend to put my boob on top of the baby when I'm laying down. I COULD, but that's another story. Nor would I roll over onto baby, because I'm like most and sleep curled up around bubs.

Both these women had to have been on something. Even in my deepest sleep (and I have had those moments of pure exhaustion) there's no way I could roll onto my baby. It would be bloody uncomfortable for a start.



Perhaps the mom was a bit larger of frame?  Just a thought... I mean I'm not small in the bust by any means, but I never worried about one of them smothering my DD in the middle of the night, if anything, she would use my boob as a pillow once she had her fill! 

Rebecca - posted on 12/04/2009

71

11

5

I have that fear too, and we co-sleep some, i put him in his crib when he goes to bed because he willl sleep from 9-12 or so, then when he gets up to eat, i hook him on and go to sleep, I don't sleep so good that way, i am constantly waking up and making sure hes ok, and he has even a time or two fallen asleep with his face in my boob while i was asleep. That's scary!! at the same time i have put him in his crib with a light blanket, and go to check on him a little later and it was wrapeed around his head, I have no idea how it got there, (but my heart stopped when i saw him that way!!), other than him kicking his legs up, so i know dress him warm and skip the blanket all together. I am currently doing research on "co-sleeper" beds, they are missing one side and they scoot up to the bed, so when he gets done feeding you can just scoot the babe over on his bed. I had a hard time staying awake at night when i got up to feed him, i turned on the tv, i ate, i even walked around. I didn't work for me, the best thing that worked for me was getting a good nap in during the day so when he woke up at night for the feeding i wasnt so exhausted at night. But i tell you every night i go to bed i say a pleading prayer to God to not take my babys, im not trying to bed morbid, but they could go because of sids or other causes..i wish i knew how to feed at night and get sleep too and not feel anxious!!

Kristen - posted on 12/04/2009

2

2

1

Just dont sit up in bed is my best advice. I fell asleep sitting up feeding my son when he was six weeks old and woke up to him screaming on the floor... :( he was okay thankfully

Clara - posted on 12/04/2009

56

25

5

Any woman falling asleep while holding an infant, especially a very young one, can suffocate the child. I'm not completely understanding the article's necessity to speak more about breastfeeding risks than about sleeping while holding infants.

As to the OP's question, breastfeeding releases hormones that relax mother and child, good because child needs to sleep and also good because mom needs to rest in this stressful time after the child is born. To stay awake while breastfeeding at night, you need to stave off the exhaustion common for a mom of a 6 week old. Try getting a light snack and a glass of water every time little nurses, not just at night, but every time. Focusing on eating will likely keep you awake better and you won't feel so tired because, let's face it, we breastfeeding moms (and most new moms, really) don't get enough calories!

Good luck. For me, the start of co-sleeping at around 5 weeks actually stopped my fears of overlying! Before that, I had near-panic attacks (in that still not quite awake state) almost nightly, feeling all over the bed wondering what my husband or I had squished her, even going so far as to undress every pillow within reach, thinking I'd over-swaddled her. My husband would ask, "What's going on?" and then I'd fully wake up and remember that I always put her back in her bassinet after nursing.

Kelsi - posted on 12/04/2009

31

18

0

yeah, of course there is going to be paranoia but like others have said those resources arnt very reliable and moms have been feeding there babies like this since....forever probably! as long as you do it right and fall asleep with the babies airways completely untouched then you wont have a problem. I've fed my 6 month old daughter like that every night since she was 2 months old

Christa - posted on 12/04/2009

583

80

45

I always took my newborn out to the family room to nurse during the night. I would always grab a glass of water and either graham crackers or carrot sticks and watch something on TV to keep me awake. When I was done I would put my child back in their bed. I think to each their own. For me, I would have a very hard time forgiving myself if an accident did happen. And to know that it has to others.......I just didn't want to risk it.

[deleted account]

My son spend the first 5ish months of his life sleeping upright on me while I slept sitting up in my bed. Due to his reflux it was the ONLY way he would sleep. I am a very light sleeper and was too emotionally distraught to sleep much anyway.

Karen - posted on 12/04/2009

124

2

16

Just a bit of information for mothers not from the UK. The Sun is a tabloid newspaper so not what I would call a reliable source of information, in a lot of stories they run I wouldn't even call them factual. So my point is don't decide not to co-sleep based on this article, do the research, follow the advice given above and there is no more risk of sids by co-sleeping than by crib sleeping.

Amber - posted on 12/04/2009

385

20

45

i havent had my baby yet but i plan on using a moses basket i bought in bed with us at night. its a soft one instead of wicker, so it wont scratch me up or leave marks. that way its like the baby has her own bed on our bed. i can still feed easily and quickly and tend to whatever needs she has without getting out of bed, but there isnt that risk of rolling over on her.

Jenelle - posted on 12/04/2009

42

12

0

I am terrified of sleeping with my baby in the bed with me for that reason exactly. Getting a little extra sleep is just not worth the risk to me.

Jessie - posted on 12/04/2009

722

60

54

Quoting Elle:

My daughter starts out in her crib and if she wakes up during the night I bring her to bed with me. By her starting out in her own bed I get a little sleep so by the time she's in bed with me I'm not exhausted. I'm a light sleeper though...


this is also how I do it with my son. That way I've had a few hours of sleep first and I am also a very ligth sleeper!

[deleted account]

I don't get how she smothered her baby while sitting in the "super comfy" plane seat! I've often fallen asleep sitting in a chair while feeding my babies. It's not often that I DON'T nod off! Not once have I even got close to smothering a baby.

At night the easiest thing to do is co-sleep. How on earth did that mother smother TWO babies while co-sleeping? I don't know about anyone else, but I don't tend to put my boob on top of the baby when I'm laying down. I COULD, but that's another story. Nor would I roll over onto baby, because I'm like most and sleep curled up around bubs.

Both these women had to have been on something. Even in my deepest sleep (and I have had those moments of pure exhaustion) there's no way I could roll onto my baby. It would be bloody uncomfortable for a start.

Dawn - posted on 12/03/2009

92

11

5

Nearly forgot these things make the news *because* they are soooo very rare.



dxx

Minnie - posted on 12/03/2009

7,076

9

786

Quoting Paige:

omg that's a scary thing o.o now I'M afraid to breast feed my baby in bed! Maybe this will be motivation enough to keep me up....


Obviously you have to make your own decisions, Paige, but you should make your decisions based on accurate information, not sensational stories.



Breastfeeding your little one in bed is safe as long as you do it correctly- just like anything else.

Jessica - posted on 12/03/2009

256

7

27

Quoting Geralyn:

Oh, and Jessica, my hubby, too, slept elsewhere. Lol. He returned to our bed last month when my son was 18 months. We were both concerned when my son was little because he is such a heavy sleeper (and he snores!). He stayed away longer than I thought was necessary, but he's back, and we are loving it!



My hubby is very much a tosser/turner (in addition to snoring) so we both agreed on cosleeping before DD was born, with him on the sleeper sofa.

Paige - posted on 12/03/2009

76

21

5

omg that's a scary thing o.o now I'M afraid to breast feed my baby in bed! Maybe this will be motivation enough to keep me up....

Nicole - posted on 12/03/2009

131

4

11

I take my 6 week old son into bed at night. We both doze off frequently. I was afraid of smothering him in the beginning, but soon found that I am hyper-aware of his every move. I wake up when he wakes up, and my body does curl around him with him in the solid empty space by my tummy. I really enjoy the closeness and he likes to have night-time nibbles so it all works out.

This accident is very tragic, but I have never heard of anything like this happening. The many people that I've heard of nursing in bed have had great sucess and no troubles like this.

Nicole - posted on 12/03/2009

421

15

23

we have co-slept since day one. the key is practicing common sense safety precautions. I find the sole purpose of a crib is a safety recall ;)

Robin - posted on 12/03/2009

6

29

0

One make sure you have a snack (trail mix is great) and drink liquids everytime you nurse. It with help with the lack of energy (which can cause you to fall asleep). Two I would listen to upbeat music on my Ipod to keep me awake or watch tv to keep myself awake! I had the same problem as you for the 1st two of months. I was also told to eat plenty of foods rich in Iron & Protien to help. Well good luck hope my tips helped & hang in there it does get eaiser.

Geralyn - posted on 12/03/2009

1,616

35

240

Oh, and Jessica, my hubby, too, slept elsewhere. Lol. He returned to our bed last month when my son was 18 months. We were both concerned when my son was little because he is such a heavy sleeper (and he snores!). He stayed away longer than I thought was necessary, but he's back, and we are loving it!

Geralyn - posted on 12/03/2009

1,616

35

240

I am a huge fan of co-sleeping at night to BF (and cuddle and be with my son). We plan on co-sleeping beyond BFing at night til my son is ready and wanting to have his own bed. I know that stories like this happen that make people afraid to co-sleep, but it can be done safely even if mom falls asleep while BF'ing. The moms posting have some really good tips.

Emily - posted on 12/02/2009

11

16

0

Quoting Geralyn:

Interesting blurb I found....


James McKenna, founder of the Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory at Notre-Dame, noted in his observations of hundreds of mother-baby sleeping pairs that breastfeeding mothers in particular were highly attuned to their babies' needs. Mother and baby tended to sleep facing each other, with the baby oriented to the mother's breasts.

Moreover, nearly all mothers unconsciously slept in the same protective pose – curled around the baby, in such a way that the position of the elbows and knees made accidental overlying almost impossible. Nor was the shared sleep a passive act – mothers and babies were frequently "checking in" by touch to make sure the other was present and breathing.

In other words, normal mothers simply do not "drop off" into a state of heavy, unwakable sleep. The maternal instinct is simply too strong. Further, the sense of spatial awareness which prevents adults from falling out of bed in their sleep helps to prevent overlying. Just as normal adults can sense the edge of the bed in their sleep, they can sense the presence of a warm, breathing baby. Anthropologist Katherine Dettwyler concurs: “The average, typical parent sleeping on a good mattress will be very aware and will not roll over on [her infant].” (1)

McKenna attributes the myth that overlying is common to cultural prejudice, stemming from the deliberate smothering of infants by babies in the Middle Ages. This form of infanticide, practiced by overworked mothers of many, resulted in priests banning babies from the family bed.



Read more: http://infant-toddler-health.suite101.co...


I never really thought about it, but I would always sleep on my side with knees curled up, and I was never concerned about rolling over on my son.

The only thing that concerned me was that when he was on those early months where his little neurological system was developing, he would kinda thrash in his sleep, what I always thought of as motor reflexes, and it would wake him up. I found that picking him up and holding him/nursing him allowed him to sleep. [I sat in a recliner, which I would never do again, due to concerns similar to the couch.] So what would be a good position that would be safe to help counteract some of these thrashings so that the baby can actually get some more solid sleep?



I still nap with my 9 month (and 3 year old) everyday.  I have noticed that we sleep like this.  If I put my baby in the crib, none of us can sleep soundly.



 



When I was nursing through out the evening, I would get up and sit in the recliner.  I used a boppy to lay him on.  If he fell asleep, he was across my lap.  If I fell asleep, we were reclined enough that he wouldn't roll off.  It worked for us.  But, as you know, everyone is different.

Kimberley - posted on 12/02/2009

35

0

1

I think you should sit up in a good fitted chair and use the pillow "Breastfriend". Although I may fall asleep with my son while feeding in the early AM he is on the special pillow and I am sitting upright in a chair that fits me so I can not move or lean forward. website for pillow: http://www.mybrestfriend.com/

Rachel - posted on 12/02/2009

254

20

25

I struggled with falling asleep while breastfeeding too. And so did my son! lol. Some things we tried while breastfeeding so I could stay awake: listening to music, listening to books on tape, watching a movie or tv, husband getting up with me and talking to me, sipping a drink or snacking on something... that's all I remember for now!



We stopped co-sleeping after a week or two. My brain simply wouldn't shut of when the baby was in the bed, or even in the room. We tried the bassinet too, but *every* sound he made woke me up. I never got enough rest until he was in his own room (which was next to ours). I'm not usually a light sleeper, but mommy-mode and the fear that something would happen to him made me much more responsive.

Hannah - posted on 12/02/2009

471

15

79

Wow. I have always fed my daughter sitting up in bed, and often doze off when doing it, and have never thought twice about it. I prop myself up with pillows and one behind my head so that I CAN catch a few zzzz's. I find you are always aware of the presence of your baby, even if it is on some lower level. I doze off and wake up to find I still have an almost vice like grip on little one. I'm not going to change how I do things, I feel happy that it is safe.

[deleted account]

Quoting Geralyn:

Interesting blurb I found....


James McKenna, founder of the Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory at Notre-Dame, noted in his observations of hundreds of mother-baby sleeping pairs that breastfeeding mothers in particular were highly attuned to their babies' needs. Mother and baby tended to sleep facing each other, with the baby oriented to the mother's breasts.

Moreover, nearly all mothers unconsciously slept in the same protective pose – curled around the baby, in such a way that the position of the elbows and knees made accidental overlying almost impossible. Nor was the shared sleep a passive act – mothers and babies were frequently "checking in" by touch to make sure the other was present and breathing.

In other words, normal mothers simply do not "drop off" into a state of heavy, unwakable sleep. The maternal instinct is simply too strong. Further, the sense of spatial awareness which prevents adults from falling out of bed in their sleep helps to prevent overlying. Just as normal adults can sense the edge of the bed in their sleep, they can sense the presence of a warm, breathing baby. Anthropologist Katherine Dettwyler concurs: “The average, typical parent sleeping on a good mattress will be very aware and will not roll over on [her infant].” (1)

McKenna attributes the myth that overlying is common to cultural prejudice, stemming from the deliberate smothering of infants by babies in the Middle Ages. This form of infanticide, practiced by overworked mothers of many, resulted in priests banning babies from the family bed.



Read more: http://infant-toddler-health.suite101.co...


I never really thought about it, but I would always sleep on my side with knees curled up, and I was never concerned about rolling over on my son.

The only thing that concerned me was that when he was on those early months where his little neurological system was developing, he would kinda thrash in his sleep, what I always thought of as motor reflexes, and it would wake him up. I found that picking him up and holding him/nursing him allowed him to sleep. [I sat in a recliner, which I would never do again, due to concerns similar to the couch.] So what would be a good position that would be safe to help counteract some of these thrashings so that the baby can actually get some more solid sleep?


That's a good article. I've coslept with all 3 of my kids (not at the same time) and I sleep this way w/all of them. I also sleep w/my arm under my 5mth olds neck, so that hes kinda propped up and I can tell if he rolls over or something.



 



 



My now 3yo slept on my chest for the first couple months-it was the only way she could sleep, but I was very aware that she was there.

Geralyn - posted on 12/02/2009

1,616

35

240

Another great article... One point it makes is that car accidents are the number 1 cause of deaths in children, caused in part by car seats not being installed correctly, yet there isn't a push to have parents transport their children less frequently. Clearly car accidents happen much more frequently than "overlying."



http://drmomma.blogspot.com/2009/10/soli...

Brenda - posted on 12/02/2009

2,386

62

250

I have to wonder if the mother was not on something for the flight when this happened. I've slept with Nick since the hospital and not once have I ever not known he was next to me. I think the worst I've done was accidently laid my arm above his head and woke myself up when I did it.

Women do not regularly smother their infants. I prop myself up on my arm and feed side lying and hardly ever fall asleep. But I can't fall asleep because I have to hold my breast for him so my arm falls asleep and gets painful if I lay there too long....LOL

Geralyn - posted on 12/02/2009

1,616

35

240

Interesting blurb I found....





James McKenna, founder of the Mother-Baby Behavioral Sleep Laboratory at Notre-Dame, noted in his observations of hundreds of mother-baby sleeping pairs that breastfeeding mothers in particular were highly attuned to their babies' needs. Mother and baby tended to sleep facing each other, with the baby oriented to the mother's breasts.



Moreover, nearly all mothers unconsciously slept in the same protective pose – curled around the baby, in such a way that the position of the elbows and knees made accidental overlying almost impossible. Nor was the shared sleep a passive act – mothers and babies were frequently "checking in" by touch to make sure the other was present and breathing.



In other words, normal mothers simply do not "drop off" into a state of heavy, unwakable sleep. The maternal instinct is simply too strong. Further, the sense of spatial awareness which prevents adults from falling out of bed in their sleep helps to prevent overlying. Just as normal adults can sense the edge of the bed in their sleep, they can sense the presence of a warm, breathing baby. Anthropologist Katherine Dettwyler concurs: “The average, typical parent sleeping on a good mattress will be very aware and will not roll over on [her infant].” (1)



McKenna attributes the myth that overlying is common to cultural prejudice, stemming from the deliberate smothering of infants by babies in the Middle Ages. This form of infanticide, practiced by overworked mothers of many, resulted in priests banning babies from the family bed.







Read more: http://infant-toddler-health.suite101.co...





I never really thought about it, but I would always sleep on my side with knees curled up, and I was never concerned about rolling over on my son.



The only thing that concerned me was that when he was on those early months where his little neurological system was developing, he would kinda thrash in his sleep, what I always thought of as motor reflexes, and it would wake him up. I found that picking him up and holding him/nursing him allowed him to sleep. [I sat in a recliner, which I would never do again, due to concerns similar to the couch.] So what would be a good position that would be safe to help counteract some of these thrashings so that the baby can actually get some more solid sleep?

Geralyn - posted on 12/02/2009

1,616

35

240

Can I ask a stupid question? I usually was in the side-lying position on the bed, but what exactly is the issue with sitting in bed BF'ing and falling asleep? What could possibly have happened on the plane that the women fell asleep and smothered the baby? I am not just getting it....

As far as the second story, how could it happen so coincidentally to one woman two times?

Elle - posted on 12/01/2009

153

0

22

My daughter starts out in her crib and if she wakes up during the night I bring her to bed with me. By her starting out in her own bed I get a little sleep so by the time she's in bed with me I'm not exhausted. I'm a light sleeper though...

Becky - posted on 12/01/2009

230

27

47

I never actually felt that exhausted when my son was a newborn, and fed him while sitting up in bed with pillows behind me to prop me up. My son slept in our room in a bassinette, I was never comfortable with cobedding. You could always ask your husband if he will help you by bringing the baby to you and putting him back to bed if you are that exhausted. You could also set an alarm to alert you when it is time for you to put him back. Just set it for how long he usually takes. Make sure you are taking naps during the day when he sleeps too.

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms