Trivisol, isn't breast milk enough?

Rebekah - posted on 06/25/2009 ( 40 moms have responded )

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Why would a pediatrician ask me to supplement my breastfeeding by giving my baby trivisol. Doesn't breast milk have all the nutrients my baby needs? Has anyone else come across trivisol? I have opted not to give it to her at this time, she really doesn't like it.

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Rebekah - posted on 05/07/2012

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I did NOT give my daughter the poly-vi-sol that was recommended when she was a baby (and exclusively breastfeeding) and by 1 year her D levels were normal, BUT she was very anemic. Now, I DO give my son the poly-vi-sol vitamins this time around, as recommended.

Also as a nursing mom, I was told to take 2,000-4,000 IUs of vitamin D a day.

Erin - posted on 05/07/2012

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Babies do not produce vitamin D on their own. Trivisol helps your baby to absorb calcium form your milk and you should be giving it. In Canada anyway it is always recommend, but perhaps if you live in a warmer climate it is not required.

Melissa - posted on 04/28/2012

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I lived in the UK when my daughter was born. Not a lot of sunlight, obviously. However, I never have her additional vitamins, nor did my doctor or midwife suggest I give them to her. I breastfed until she was 16 months and never had any issues. She is now 4 1/2 and has never been ill (except a couple of episodes of conjunctivitis). The best you can do for your child is get as much information as is available and make an informed decision.

Minnie - posted on 06/28/2009

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Then your doc is misinformed, because vitamin D most certainly does transfer through breastmilk.

Kim - posted on 06/28/2009

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My doctor recomended vitamins because Vitamin D does not transfer through breastmilk. She also told me that he did not have to have it every day that 3 times a week or so was enough. I continue to take my prenatal vitamins and try to give it to him a few times a week.

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Ashley - posted on 06/30/2009

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Hi Rebekah! My ped told me to give my son poly-tri(when he was younger)/vi(when he got older)-sol drops because of breastmilk not having much vitamin D. I don't remember how old he was at the time, but he was a few months old. He always threw up and when I told my ped, she said I didn't have to give it to him. He's 3 now and never had any serious issues. My daughter turned 1 and I just started her on a vitamin that contains fluoride. She does fine with it. Remember your ped may not always be right and I don't think your ped is against breastfeeding. You know what's best for your child and if she doesn't like it or is vomiting, it's not worth it.

Candice - posted on 06/28/2009

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My doctor suggested vitamins too. Any way I tried to sneak it to my daughter, she always spit it back in my face. I still take my prenatal multi-vitamin and try to remember that my diet is feeding her. It keeps me from eating too much junk.

Vicki - posted on 06/27/2009

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Hm, I find this really interesting, as my regular nurse and my doctor both recommend a vitamin D supplement, and I never really questionned it. The doctor at the hospital had been a little concerned that my boy was too white and ordered additional blood tests, which as far as I am aware came back fine. That did cause me to worry he would burn easily, however, though I rarely use sunscreen myself.

Guggie - posted on 06/27/2009

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First off, depleted levels of vitamin D resulting in a vitamin D deficiency is a fair concern for nursing mothers who have consistently followed the scaremongering and slathered themselves in high UPF/SPF sunscreen, especially during pregnancy.



The studies are causing quite a stir in medical and scientific circles. Basically, they screwed us over by freaking about melanoma and now a lot of mommies and babies are going to suffer for it (as usual, we tend to suffer from their mistakes).



The major formula companies jumped on this issue to gain entry into a market: nursing mothers. They developed several drugs marketed to the nursing mother in the hopes that slagging sales would recover.



Here's the thing:



1. I haven't researched every single supplement out there, but from what I can tell, the most popular brands contain a very low-quality vitamin D (vit. D comes in three levels of quality; it is a fat-soluble vitamin that can be toxic in large amounts).



2. You can remedy a deficiency yourself: put you and your baby in the sunshine for 10-15 minutes a day. Stop using sunscreen; most brands have 3 forms of aluminum and cat urine in them anyways. Use rash guard clothes and a hat. Don't put sunglasses on if possible, or at least make sure you get light to the eyes for a period of time every day. The majority of vit. D conversion occurs from sunlight through the eyes.



3. Any nursing mother who is concerned about vit. D deficiency should demand a blood sample. If a doctor is pushing supplements, tell the doctor you will consider supplements AFTER a blood sample. Get an actual number and diagnosis!



Check out this thread:



http://www.mothering.com/discussions/sho...



Better alternative to Tri-vi-sol?



http://www.mothering.com/discussions/sho...

Guggie - posted on 06/27/2009

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First off, depleted levels of vitamin D resulting in a vitamin D deficiency is a fair concern for nursing mothers who have consistently followed the scaremongering and slathered themselves in high UPF/SPF sunscreen, especially during pregnancy.



The studies are causing quite a stir in medical and scientific circles. Basically, they screwed us over by freaking about melanoma and now a lot of mommies and babies are going to suffer for it (as usual, we tend to suffer from their mistakes).



The major formula companies jumped on this issue to gain entry into a market: nursing mothers. They developed several drugs marketed to the nursing mother in the hopes that slagging sales would recover.



Here's the thing:



1. I haven't researched every single supplement out there, but from what I can tell, the most popular brands contain a very low-quality vitamin D (vit. D comes in three levels of quality; it is a fat-soluble vitamin that can be toxic in large amounts).



2. You can remedy a deficiency yourself: put you and your baby in the sunshine for 10-15 minutes a day. Stop using sunscreen; most brands have 3 forms of aluminum and cat urine in them anyways. Use rash guard clothes and a hat. Don't put sunglasses on if possible, or at least make sure you get light to the eyes for a period of time every day. The majority of vit. D conversion occurs from sunlight through the eyes.



3. Any nursing mother who is concerned about vit. D deficiency should demand a blood sample. If a doctor is pushing supplements, tell the doctor you will consider supplements AFTER a blood sample. Get an actual number and diagnosis!



Check out this thread:



http://www.mothering.com/discussions/sho...



Better alternative to Tri-vi-sol?



http://www.mothering.com/discussions/sho...

Shannon - posted on 06/27/2009

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Hey Rebekah! I am going to say no, no, no and no! :) My pediatrician emphasized that breast milk was all that my little girl needed. No formula, no extra vitamins, nothing! Breast milk has everything that your baby needs - it almost sounds like your pediatrician is trying to push this supplement a little too hard.

[deleted account]

Based on what I've been told and researched for myself - breast milk contains Vitamin D, but only a small amount. Sufficient Vitamin D is necessary for good bone health. Signs of bones that may be weakening can be subtle, so there may be no obvious signs of a developmental problem.

You should definitely talk to the doctor if he/she has advised you to do anything that raises questions or concerns. Unless you have a list of other reasons to find a new ped (as someone else sugessted), I wouldn't waste the time because of this Vitamin D issue alone. It's very likely that the next one will advise you to do the very same thing!

Becky - posted on 06/27/2009

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my ped told me to get trivisol as well. I live in pittsburgh and there is VERY LITTLE sunlight here- 2nd to Seattle on average 68 days a year. Anyway because of that, I may not have as much of the vitamins we get from the sun naturally- I think its like B C and D Im not 100% on which ones. I did get those vtiamins for my ds however, they really seemed to bind him up- like I sounded like he would struggle to poop all the time. So I tried them for about a week, and concluded I wasnt worth his discomfort, told my ped that and he said to just be sure I get out in the day light enough to get those vitamins... So I think its a little your preference and how your baby may handle the vitamins. Ped sounded surprised when I said there was discomfort for my son, but didnt really press the issue.

Shawna - posted on 06/27/2009

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Many pediatricians feel babies need vitamin supplementation. Your breast-milk contains everything necessary for your daughter right now. Most of them do not get more than a very short course on breast-feeding, so all their information is not correct. It is up to you on whether to give your baby the vitamin. If its the Vitamin D they are concerned with, just make sure your daughter gets at least 10-15 mins of sun exposure a day, to help process it. Here are a few links with more info on vitamins http://www.kellymom.com/nutrition/vitami...

Sabrina - posted on 06/27/2009

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My pediatrician recomended the same thing for my baby. I think it was at her 4 month check-up but I never gave it to her and she is doing fine. I was kind of shocked too. The only one I give vitamins to is my now 2 yr old. When she went in at about 18 months her iron was low. So she gets vitamins with iron. I think it is the poly-vi-sol ones. I think its easier than the chewable cause when she gets her drink at lunch I just put it in there. And then I know she gets it all.

Minnie - posted on 06/27/2009

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Actually it only takes a few minutes in the sun for the body to make the vitamin D it needs, and not every day. No need to be without sunscreen outside all day long. Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin, just like A and E, and is stored in the body.

Chelsea - posted on 06/27/2009

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Jennifer,

If this was the case why is there not more cases of rickets? Rickets is what happens when there is a lack of vitamin D. My pediatrician said that the case of rickets has not gone up and also has not gone down since using a supplement.

[deleted account]

Chelsea,

Breastmilk does contain vitamin D, however it is not at the level that babies need to proper development. The reason that this was never a problem in the past is because people didn't slather their children with sunscreen and hide inside. They were out in the sun all of the time so their bodies produced the amount of vitamin D that they needed naturally. Now, because the sun's rays have become more dangerous, even adults are suffering from a lack of vitamin D. The fact remains that if you choose not to give a supplement, you need to make sure that your baby is getting some time everyday out side without sunscreen in order to ensure that his or her body is producing the correct amount of vitamin D.

Christine - posted on 06/26/2009

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Supplementing breastfed babies with vitamin D is a unvisersal recommendation given by pediatricians because vitamin D deficiency can lead to rickets and supplementing with vitamin D is a cheap and easy safe guard.



My doctor recommended supplementing with vitamin D. My lacation consultant explained that it was to protect againt rickets and that dark skinned babies were at greater risk. She felt that is wasn't necessary in my case but ultimately left the choice up to what I was comfortable with.



Not sure where you live but if you live in Canada, Shoppers Drug Mart house brand (Life brand) makes a vitamin D supplement that smells like fruit punch and my daughter really seemed to like it when I remembered to give it to her.

Chelsea - posted on 06/26/2009

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Breast-milk does have vitamin D. Cows milk needs it to be added but breast-milk does contain this vitamin.

Olivia - posted on 06/26/2009

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Quoting Chelsea:



Quoting diane:

the breast milk does not give the vitamin d the baby needs





Making a broad statement such as this isn't really helpful.  Can you state why you believe this and where the information came from?





The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends all infants have a minimum intake of 400 IU of vitamin D per day starting in the first 2 months of life.



No milk has vitamin D.  It is added.

Minnie - posted on 06/26/2009

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6. Breastfeeding babies need extra vitamin D.
Not true! Everyone needs vitamin D. Formula has it added at the factory. But the baby is born with a liver full of vitamin D, and outside exposure allows the baby to get the vitamin D from ultraviolet light even in winter. The baby does not need a lot of outside exposure and does not need outside exposure every day. Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin and is stored in the body. In some circumstances (for example, if the mother herself was vitamin D deficient during the pregnancy) it may be prudent to supplement the baby with vitamin D. Exposing the baby to sunlight through a closed window does not work to get the baby more vitamin D.

From: http://www.kellymom.com/newman/11some_bf...

Lauren - posted on 06/26/2009

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My ped said to give it to my daughter. So I did. She was a breastfeeding mother herself too. I picked her as my doctor because I trust her. I read articles that said do and don't. She is the one who went to medical school, not me. Aren't vitamins good for you anyway?

I gave it to my daugther up until about a month ago (she is almost 10 mo). We have started the weaning process and she is getting breastmilk and formula.



PS - My daughter did not like the taste either. I would either put it in a pumped bottle or mix it in her cereal.

Jessica - posted on 06/26/2009

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My ped also recommended the tri-vi-sol so we bought it and tried it like twice because she ended up spitting up the rest of the day and just acted like her belly really hurt. She has been perfectly fine without it.

[deleted account]

When my girls were babies I gave them the flouride vitamin (not sure what it was called) that my doctor prescribed them. I only gave it to them once a week at the most though.



I've never given my son any vitamins. I still have the bottle that they prescribed for him when he was a baby. When I took him in for his one year check up the nurse asked me if I needed a refill. I just told her no cuz I never used the first one. Nothing more was said. He is fine. As for vitamin D.... we live in Hawaii. :)

Chelsea - posted on 06/26/2009

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Quoting diane:

the breast milk does not give the vitamin d the baby needs


Making a broad statement such as this isn't really helpful.  Can you state why you believe this and where the information came from?

Alicia - posted on 06/26/2009

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My doc also recommended trivisol for the vitamin D for my son when he was an infant. She also said that since he is fair skinned, it is likely that just a short time in the sun would give him what he needs for vit. D. We did give it to him and he took it no problem. I think he actually really liked it. But I also don't think there would have been harm in not giving it to him.
The whole lack of vit D issue is becoming more prevalent as parents are really paying attention to warnings about skin cancer and sun safety--less time in sun, etc does mean less absorption of vit D.
Incidentally, our doc IS a very supportive doctor and herself nursed 3 kids. At 1 year, she was not pushing weaning, etc, so I do not think that just making this recommendation is a reason to assume she is anti-BF or anything like that. It is a recommendation by the AAP; she is a part of that group; she follows and "prescribes" those recommendations.

[deleted account]

My doc recomended tri-vi-sol because of the vitamin D issue, but my doc is a nursing mother so her "recommendation" came with a disclaimer. She said that although the AAP recomends a supplement because breastmilk is low in vitamin D, as long as mom and baby get some sunshine every day it is really unnecessary. As a new mom, I was worried about him getting enough vitamin D, put him on the supplement and he had an allergic reaction to it. I took him off and he has been fine ever since. His legs are healthy and strong and there hasn't been any signs that he has a lack of vitamin D. Go with your gut. You're already giving your baby the best thing for her by breastfeeding; just do what you feel is best. Good luck!

Kyndra - posted on 06/25/2009

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NO NO NO! your baby does not need vitamins if you are nursing. My daughter started taking the poly vi sol at like 10 months i think, just before a yr, but she was on soy formula ( i had problems breastfeeding her).

Minnie - posted on 06/25/2009

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Oh, Amanda, to reassure you about your diet concerns, you would have to be quite malnourished for your milk quality to be affected. While your own health may lack from a poor diet (but I'm sure it's not), your baby's won't.

Amanda - posted on 06/25/2009

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is the poly vi sol the same as what you ladies are talking about? my ped. told me to give to my daughter at her 4 month apt i think and i have given it but it smells aweful! i pump and give breast milk through the bottle... not sure if i eat as well as i should so didnt know if that mattered or not. any thoughts?

Karen - posted on 06/25/2009

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I asked my pediatrician when my daughter was at her first appt (4 days old) if she needed a vitamin supplement (this is all new to me) and he told me it was not neccessary if mom or baby got some sunshine daily for vitamin D. He said there may be a need for an iron supplement for mama but I was already continuing my pre-natal vitamins which is more than adequate. He said he would only be concerned if there was no time outside for either of us which at our home is never a problem. She is 11 weeks old and has been given nothing but breastmilk and is thriving well.

Chelsea - posted on 06/25/2009

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I responded the exact same way to my doctor pushing this vitamin. I went as far as to contact my lactation consultant. We both looked into the Le Leche League answers book and found that they only recommend a supplement of vitamin D is for dark skinned infants who live in places such as New England and stay inside.

I also think, like Lisa, that it's all a bunch of marketing. What is sad is that our infants are the ones that are suffering. Shoving a medicine dropper in their face is not exacly pleasant for them and especially when it's not needed.

After finding out that my doctor was indeed wrong I went back to the office and spoke with both the nurse and my doctor about giving breast-feeding mothers only half of the story. They told me "breast-milk does not contain adequate levels of vitamin D." That is just a lie. I of course asked what does a vitamin deficiency cause. It causes rickets . I asked if the cases of rickets had gone done since using the supplement and he said no and had to admit that there was never a problem with rickets in infants. Obviously there is no need.

Minnie - posted on 06/25/2009

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The whole 'breastmilk does not give baby enough vitamins after such and such an age' is marketing bunk and many many doctors have bought into it.



Breastmilk is low in iron, but exceedingly easy for baby to absorb and utilize. Same with the vitamin D. And considering it's summer it's quite easy to get baby out in the sun for a few minutes a day.



Kate is quite correct.

Kate - posted on 06/25/2009

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Oh, your ped. is not at all supportive of breastfeeding and is not informed of its benefits! I might find a new ped. because this one will probably bug you to wean at 9 - 12 months. Ummm...formula is NOT superior as the ped believes. It does have higher amounts of vitamins but the vitamins are not easily absorbed and they make the formula hard to digest. Breastmilk is easily digested and the vitamins are easily absorbed.

This is just one example of why you should NOT always listen to your doctor! Sometimes they don't have current information, or they have their own opinions which may not match current research. So...don't listen! You absolutely do not need to give vitamins because you are breastfeeding instead of using formula!

Rebekah - posted on 06/25/2009

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she is 3 months old he recommended it at her 2 month appointment. He said if I was giving her less than 30 oz of formula week I needed to supplement with tri-vi-sol. Just thought it was strange.

Kate - posted on 06/25/2009

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How old is she? If she is under a year, then she should not need a supplement. Once she is a year and is eating supplementary food and breastfeeding less or not at all, then I would recommend one. I started my DD on a chewable vitamin around a year and she enjoys it a lot now (17 mo). But for now, assuming your DD is fairly young, no, she doesn't need the vitamins. Some doctors are just not informed on the full benefits of breastmilk or assume that moms are not eating well or supplementing with formula and that's why they recommend it.

Becky - posted on 06/27/2009

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my ped told me to get trivisol as well. I live in pittsburgh and there is VERY LITTLE sunlight here- 2nd to Seattle on average 68 days a year. Anyway because of that, I may not have as much of the vitamins we get from the sun naturally- I think its like B C and D Im not 100% on which ones. I did get those vtiamins for my ds however, they really seemed to bind him up- like I sounded like he would struggle to poop all the time. So I tried them for about a week, and concluded I wasnt worth his discomfort, told my ped that and he said to just be sure I get out in the day light enough to get those vitamins... So I think its a little your preference and how your baby may handle the vitamins. Ped sounded surprised when I said there was discomfort for my son, but didnt really press the issue.

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