VBAC- vaginal birth after c-section

Katie - posted on 02/11/2009 ( 19 moms have responded )

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Has anyone had one? After how many c-sections? I want to more about this. Any information any of you have would be appreciated.



Katie

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Nina - posted on 03/26/2009

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I am really keen on trying VBAC for my second child. I have a 5 month old delivered through emergency c-section because he was only 1.82 kg (4 pounds). Is the fact that i never grew very large with my first pregnancy an advantage or a disadvantage to VBAC? Also how long should i wait before conceiving again, is it longer if i want to try VBAC? please Help, im clucky again.

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I am attempting a VBAC in July with my 2nd child. My first was born via emerg c-section after being induced and pushing for 2hrs and he was not decending into the birth canal for birth, which I blame on the fact that the staff would not allow me to walk around or labor in a sitting position. By the time the doc cut me open he told me that my son was starting to pass through the birth canal and had to pull him out! That made my upset!

With this pregnancy I was 20mths post surgery when I got pregnant and switched OBs right away to one who is very Pro natural birth. She was actually very excited in my first appointment that I wanted to try for a VBAC with this baby and not opt for a c-section. A lot of docs these days will try to scare you into thinking that c-section is the only way to go and that you will not be able to have a vaginal birth, but I honestly think it is because it is easier for them and also insurance issues for them as well.

The #1 thing though is to educate yourself on VBACs and C-sections. I prefer the VBAC for myself as the risks are much lower and the recovery will be much much better than a c-section was for me anyday!

Deann - posted on 05/06/2009

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my doctor does not even perform VBACs, she feels that any risk to uterine rupture is to great to risk

Jessica - posted on 04/17/2009

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After my csection, i asked my best friend, who is a l&d nurse about VBAC, first she informed me that the dr's here in vegas wont perform a Vbac, and second you run the risk of your uterus rupturing, something happening to your baby. Me, i'm perfectly ok with having another Csection and not pushing one of my kids out, it doesn't make me less of a mother.



I found a link to webmd that lays everything out

http://www.webmd.com/baby/tc/vaginal-bir...

Megan - posted on 04/16/2009

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Also Nina I've been told to wait 1-2 years before getting pregnant again after a c/s and I don't know if not growing very large really matters since all pregnancies and babies are different.

Megan - posted on 04/16/2009

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Yes I had a VBAC with my second baby almost six months ago and I highly recommend VBACs. There has been a lot of good advice already given to you. I also encourage you to do your own research so you can make an informed decision. There are some great books and websites (some already mentioned) There are things you can do to increase your chances such as not doing anything to induce, not having epidurals or spinals, exercising, good nutrition, staying off sugar, being positive in a good emotional state, etc...You will probably hear a lot about the risks but truthfully they are so slim less than 1% and actually there are greater risks of a repeat c/s. You will learn a lot doing your research, hope that helps!

Nicole - posted on 03/18/2009

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I am interested in having a Vback I am do in October with my second. My first was a C section I was 2 weeks late. Does anyone know of specific doctors in the area (fairlfied county) that are known for their C sections or for VBack births?

Jane - posted on 03/18/2009

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hi ive had 3 c-sections and 2 natural births.My first child was a section and my second was natural,so yes it can be done the doctors just kept an extra eye on me because of my scar.Hope this helps . x

[deleted account]

I've had two C-sections. Both times the baby was in a transverse lie with its back over the birth canal and unable to flip due to a mishapen uterus. I am scared to death of having a third C-section. My doctor says if the baby ends up in the head down position we can try it. I tried to have the others flipped, but no luck.

Tammy - posted on 03/03/2009

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Woooo Hoooo you are 110% right Erin!
Mom's... do your research and make an informed decision!!!!!

Erin - posted on 02/25/2009

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Katie and Kim,



most docs will downplay the risks of c-section. they don't do it deliberately and certainly not maliciously but they still do it. MAinly b/c the list is so long and most of the things that can happen do so later in life so the doc doesn't see it very often. The risks of the immediate surgery are the same as for any other abdominal surgery: blood loss, infection, DVT, pulmonary emboli. But there are indirect risks too: separation of mother and baby, difficulty bonding, difficulty breastfeeding, accidental prematurity and all the complications that entails. then the long term risks include adhesions, bowel obstructions, infertility, miscarriage, placental abruption, previa, acreta, precreta, and uterine rupture (it can still happen prior to labor) etc etc etc.. Some of these risks are more common than others and most of them get worse the more surgeries you have.



Risk of uterine rupture during a VBAC is actually less than 1% - it is actually 0.3 to 0.5% if you go into labor on your own and do not receive pit or any other labor stimulating drug. Of those that rupture very few are truly catastrophic(meaning result in a death). If you are induced the risk of rupture goes up to 1-3% depending on the study and if you are induced you are less likely to succeed as well. The use of prostaglandins in VBAC'S has been shown to increase the risk of rupture to about 5-9% so most responsible docs don't use them. When you really look at it, if you go into labor on your own and keep all interventions to a minimum, including epidural, you have no greater risk with a vbac than you do in a normal non-prior-cesrean delivery having something like a shoulder dystocia or cord prolapse. So in reality if a hospital can't get a mother to the OR in time for those other possible problems just as fast as they would need for a VBAC rupture then they shouldn't be doing birth at all, period!!! (source cited: Pushed by Jennifer Block and Obstretic Myths vs Research Realities by Henci Goer)



Lynn above is also correct in saying how you were cut plays a big part. Most docs do  a low horizontal incision nowadays but it also matters how you were sutured closed - a double suture of the uterine lining has been shown to be more resistant to rupture.



Hope this info helps. And please do you research and get a second opinion if this is something you really want.

Tammy - posted on 02/24/2009

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I had two vaginal births after a c-section. The first was a natural birth where I gave birth to a 9lb baby boy and the second was a induction at 42 and a half week when I gave birth to a 10lb 11 ounce baby boy! You can do it!

Look at statistics and the pros and cons then make your decisions based on facts. You might be surprised at the risks of repeat c-section birth verses vaginal. I know I was!

I’m also a birth doula who specializes in guiding VBAC moms let me know if you need references for information, I’d be more than happy to help!

Courtney - posted on 02/24/2009

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http://www.birthright.com.au/news/defaul...



i found this web site really helpful!

most midwifes i have talked to recommend vbac.

every situation is different but i think if there is a chance you can experience naturally bringing a child into the world go for it!

i had a emergency c/s with my daughter and i am planning on trying to deliver naturally next time. Hopefully if all goes well



Caesarean Rates





Caesarean Section rate is on the increase in Australia – again. Now up to about 32% of all births. The main reason listed is “psychosocial reasons” - what a multitude of things this covers! Generally this is put forward because it is a ‘convenience’ for either the Doctor or the woman. This also covers ‘vanity’, but mainly FEAR!



FEAR is the underlying reason that many women choose to discuss this option in the first place.



FEAR around childbirth, is what is portrayed in the media.



FEAR is what pregnant women are exposed to from the general community – all those horror labour stories.



FEAR is the basis of many books on childbirth.



FEAR should be addressed. How?



1. Choose your caregiver wisely. Shop around for a midwifery model of care. Midwives specialize in looking after normal pregnancies, labours and births. Midwives understand normal birth and support women’s rights to have the experience they want and to birth their babies without medical intervention. You need a Doctor if you are sick.

2. Choose your place of birth wisely. Investigate all your options. Book a tour at your local hospital. Check that they have both a Delivery Suite (Labour Ward) and a Birth Centre. In a Birth Centre you have the added option of labouring and birthing in water, in a non-medicalised environment. Meet with some Independent Midwives (homebirth Midwives). Too many women dismiss this option without discovering what it means to have a baby in your own home environment and understanding the benefits for Mum, baby and Dad.

3. Find some good pre-natal classes. Hospital classes are restricted to many boundaries around birth. With an Independent Educator you will be able to explore all your choices. Look for somewhere in your area that provides a range of classes. At Birth Right we offer the Active Birth, Early Parenting, calmbirth®, and HypnoBirthing®, so that women are able to choose what’s right for them.

4. Employ a Doula! – no doubt about it, this makes an enormous difference to your birthing experience. This invaluable support during pregnancy, labour, birth and post-natally, is the key to both of you enjoying this amazing journey of welcoming your baby into the world. Don’t rely on just Dad, your best friend, sister etc. – get the professional!



For women who feel safe and well supported they will labour and birth their baby beautifully and without FEAR.



Both calmbirth® and HypnoBirthing® classes will give you an understanding of the role FEAR plays in labour and birth and teaches methods of eliminating all FEAR, through relaxation, visualization and hypnosis. This is not only a valuable skill for labour but a life skill, that is certainly useful throughout your parenting career.

Whitney - posted on 02/23/2009

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did you have a rough time with the first birth? I had a major blood loss, and had to have a blood transfussion and 3 units put back into me...and had a LONG recovery in the hospital...and when I left, my blood level still wasn't good...I have O negative blood...which means I can only have my type...is it different if you had those things go on, if you want to try vbac?

Courtney - posted on 02/18/2009

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I had a csection with my first who is now 2.5 and my second was a vbac and she is now 1.  It was the best decision I ever made.  The recovery time is amazing, especially with a little one at home.  Also, there is a 1% chance of your uterus rupturing, but csections give you the same chance and the more you have the more the odds go up.  Ask your doctor for the odds of death from a vbac for mom or baby and they are no different than a csection.  You can research it online.  Try the March of Dimes.  Good luck in whatever decision you make.

Lynne - posted on 02/16/2009

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The bottom line...Do you trust your dr?  Each person is different. How long between pregnancies? How were you cut? how big is the baby? what is the reason for the first C-section? Your weight gain? maybe even your age, your size. Is a vanginal delivery really all that important to you?  This isn't  the 1930's your dr would never take a chance with you or your childs life.  You asked for opinions so of course you want help desiding. But it's really between you, your husband and your Dr.  Follow your heart!

Beth - posted on 02/16/2009

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My dr told me that the odds of successfuly completing a VBAC are like 40% He told me that the medical team will be way more jumpy than a normal birth and if anything even looks like it may go wrong you are in the OR before you know it.  He told me it was a waste of my efforts to try one.

Kim - posted on 02/12/2009

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I have only had a c-section, but I talked to my doctor today at my 6 week postpartum about a VBAC next time and she said probably not just because if the uterus ruptures during delivery there really is much they can do for the baby at that point. even though there is only like a 1% chance of that happening, i don't think i want to risk it, despite the fact that i desperatly want to have a vaginal delivery, but i have to consider the risk of losing a baby during delivery, and i don't want that to happen.

Lynne - posted on 02/11/2009

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Hi,  I am a Vback...25 years ago I was one of 10 attempted in the US and one of 6 to succeed.  I had an emergency c for my first. then three years later I found a dr that would allow me to attempt a vaginal delivery.  Then three years after that I was the first double vback success, in Pennsylvania.  I felt cheated with my first c, when I was looking forward to natural.  So having my 2nd and 3rd natural was awesome.  The only draw back was I had to deliver in the operating room, just incase there was complications!

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