Is something wrong when a 3 year old can't jump or hop ?

Louise - posted on 03/11/2010 ( 16 moms have responded )

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I have a friend her son was 3 in December and he can't jump or hop and does not know how. I did try to show him a few times but does not get it. My both daughters were well able to do that by 2. Do any one thing there is something wrong. M y friend things I crazy.

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Jessica - posted on 12/18/2010

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I actually asked about this at my son's early childhood screening. Although he could hop and jump, he had just learned how to and so I asked the screeners when is normal, and they said that although it is common for them to know how to by 3 or 3 1/2, it isn't abnormal if they don't until 4 or 4 1/2. Some children develop that type of coordination at different rates than other.

Carla - posted on 09/30/2011

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I also don't think we can generalise about these kind of things. My son is active, can ride a bike without training wheels and can swim. He will be 4 in December. But he can't hop either. I don't worry about his balance though, given that he can ride a bike. Maybe he doesn't really see the point in hopping. You can, after all, get everywhere faster with two legs.

Gem - posted on 03/16/2010

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there is nothing wrong with him each child is an individual and reach miles stones at different times. i have four children and my youngest only been jumping and trying to hop for a few months. she is nearly 4 years old.

Alyssa - posted on 03/14/2010

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My daughter just turned four and has to really concentrate before she jumps. Otherwise one foot makes it off the ground but the other doesn't. When she concentrates she gets both off the ground but I've noticed she lands with straight legs. So she can't jump up and down over and over again. She would much rather sit and read, color or do puzzles right now than be involved with physical activity. I encourage her and we work on it as long as she's interested but I wouldn't worry unless she's upset because she can't. You can always ask her pediatrician too if you're concerned.

Emily - posted on 01/05/2011

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dont sweat it im almost 25 and couldn't jump or hop at three but now I can. Everyone develops at a different rate.

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Stacey - posted on 10/28/2011

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there is nothing wrong with him my daughter started to jump on the spot at about 3 n same for hoping all kids learn at different ages n just because a 2 year old can hop n a 4 year old cant does not make either of them not normal or to say any thing is wrong with them i think most people worry way to much i dont think u should compare 2 kids from one another they all do things at different ages

Becky - posted on 10/18/2011

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In the long run, when a child learns how to do these things has no relavance later in life. If you had a bunch of adults hopping on one foot, you wouldn't be able to tell when in life they began doing so.

Jessica - posted on 12/12/2010

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Actually it's not to odd. My son just started to learn how to skip or hop on one foot and he'll be 5 in March! But then again, he does had a foot issue but either way I don't see it as an off thing. Alot of children learn and grow at their own pace!

Eyal - posted on 12/10/2010

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Hello dear mothers!
My name is Eyal Tzioni, a Phd. student in physical therapy in Israel, founder of 'Adaptive-Load' treatment method, an innovative treatment method for a wide spectrum of motor & posture disorders among children and adolescents.
From my proffesional point of view, a 4 years old kid who can't hop needs an immediate intervention, since hopping at that age (and even earlier) is an important key for acquiring some fundamental motor skills, such as galloping, skipping and others. Sometimes, a difficulty to jump or hop could have a bad effect on running! Acquiring these skills has a huge contribution for emotional, social, cognitive and motor development (and overall sense of well being). a child who can't jump or hop (due to various reasons, such as hypotonia and pronated feet, lack of balance or poor coordination) may prefer to slouch in front of a computer or TV, than being active at all.
'A.L.' treatment method includs more than 2500 novel exercises based on scientific principle, for improving every aspect of motor performance (as well as treatment of motor disorders, such as hypotonia and DCD), dozens of them designed for children who can't hop or jump at all.
for further info. of our methods, please visit motori-kal (name of the clinic) website at: http://www.motori-kal.com/?p=17

Hi again,
I've receive some responses lately about my post. Well, I'd like to clarify few things:
It's true that children develop at a different pace. But it's also true that your duty as caring mothers, is to give your child the ability to choose whether to hop or gallop or jumprope, or run freely with his friends at kindergarten/ classroom, or whether to watch them playing from the sidelines. and furthermore, think about our Spontaneous reaction when we receive some good news, we jump high to the sky and raise our hand, that's a human natural way to express happiness (body language)... why then, should we deprive that ability from our child??
Here are some relevant lines, copied from my website:

Normally, a child with the physical abilities to actively participate in games, will naturally choose to join in sports play. Like humans, animals spend their time involved sensory-motor experiences. If we look for instance at a domestic pet, like a kitten, we can easily see that it is constantly engaged in games, (such as moving objects and chasing them, climbing, rolling, jumping, etc.). The innate purpose of these games is to equip the cat with motor and perceptual skills that are critical for its development and survival, (hunting, for instance, requires speed, quick and accurate timing and good eye-limb coordination).

Humans are born with a small number of primitive reflexes. As a result of our perceptual-motor experiences, we build up a mature body scheme, learning to “know” our bodies, and constantly enhancing our movements. The feedback from these motor experiences enriches us physically, perceptually and cognitively, which in turn affect us emotionally and socially.

Therefore, active physical games and movement during childhood are extremely important evolutionary components for proper motor-perception, cognitive, social and emotional development.

In the case of the “avoiding child”, because the child senses that he/she doesn’t have the motor ability to perform the necessary skills involved in playing an outdoor game, he/she chooses not to play and instead chooses the TV or computer. Typically, even a single failure at physical play can stop a child.

In the paradox of a high verbal IQ/low performance IQ, high intelligence was acting against the child. The child created his own various scenarios of, “what could happen if…?”, (‘If I pass inaccurately, if I miss a shot’, etc). This puts off any chance of being motivated to take part in a ball game.

For a highly intelligent child, even one negative experience is often enough to decide that playing sports with friends is out of the question. It only takes one stumble while trying to score, or an insult for having missed an easy shot, to convince a child to seek refuge in front of a computer screen. It makes no difference how much time has passed since the blunder; a child’s episodic memory concerning such disappointments is quite resistant.

Parents can help their children to acquire coordination and sports skills. When children have the necessary physical skills to participate in games, they will have the freedom to choose which games to play. The child will no longer feel the need to avoid joining in a game. That ability gives the child freedom to choose, and it is the parent's obligation to enable their child to acquire various sports skills, improve their coordination, etc. The child can then choose between playing basketball, soccer, tennis or any other team game. The choice will be made among many defaults, avoidance not being one of them. If the child prefers to stay home and watch television, it's a legitimate choice (maybe he's tired at that moment and doesn't wish to play outside...).

Hope that things are more reasonable now...

P.S., an entire page on my website, deals with the importance of hopping etc, from a scientific point of view. The information is in Hebrew at this time. Please use Google Translate to read the vital info.
Follow this direct link to view the page:
http://www.motori-kal.com/?p=29


Sincerely,
Eyal Tzioni
Founder of Motori-kal method
Motori-kal, Israel
www.motori-kal.com

Medic - posted on 03/22/2010

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My son is also pigeion toed and has been jumping and hopping since 2 so I'm not so sure thats to blame.

Jessica - posted on 03/19/2010

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My son is 4 and just learning how to hop (he can jump). I noticed at his Pre-K eval. a few kids had trouble with it. I think it's just something some kids pick up on faster then others. My son has problem with his foot going inward so I figured thats why he can't hop -- which we found out that is part of it. I wouldn't worry to much. Boys don't learn as fast as girls. I see it everyday with my niece and son who are only 6 weeks apart. She excels in certain areas and he does too.

Mary - posted on 03/16/2010

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my daughter is delayed she has speech delay and sensory processing disorder. she does speech therapy and OT. He may have a sensory or motor skills delay. the parent should ask a pediatrician about occupational therapy.

Heather - posted on 03/13/2010

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yes! my 2 preemies had low muscle tone and couldn't jump until 3. a milestone should be able to jump of the ground with 2 feet (catching air) by 2 years even if they don't like to do it. a 3 year old should also be climbing and jumping off low structures. my boys were helped with private OT for about a year each. and we had things we had to practice with them at home too. many dr's dismiss parents concerns. call your local area early childhood education referral line to talk with someone and have free in home eval- changed our lives- it is free and is listed under your local school district. good luck. i say address concerns before school starts!

Alison - posted on 03/11/2010

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My girls were also starting to jump around age two, but according to this, it happens between 2 1/2 and 3 1/2:

http://email.mtsd.k12.wi.us/~jtuttle/Dev...



Usually the most effective teacher for a child is another child. We sing songs about bunnies and frogs and that gets my girls jumping.

Monica - posted on 03/11/2010

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i think it's a little odd!! all kids are different, but it's def a question to bring up with the pediatrician, and also i'd google "hop/jump milestone ages, etc" something like that because i'm sure there's information about it out there!

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