What is the best book you have ever read to your children?

Rebecca - posted on 02/10/2013 ( 11 moms have responded )

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I want to know what some great choices are for books to read to my son. The book must espouse values.

My favorite, to date, is Alphabet Living.

Anyone?

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Carla - posted on 02/12/2013

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The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe was beautiful. When Aslan lay dying and the girls were crying over him, I cried great buckets. It mirrors Jesus and Satan so well that if they are explained to the children in this context, it is a great teaching tool.

Just adding my 2 cents worth, I love CS Lewis' books. Did you read the Screwtape Letters? Great read!

Angela - posted on 02/12/2013

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I read The Magician's Nephew by CS Lewis to my son years ago (he's 32 now!). It's actually the FIRST of the Narnia Chronicles - if you read them in the correct order. He absolutely loved it and because the accompanying books in the same series are interesting, entertaining and not difficult to read, he read the rest of the set by himself - he loved them! I read them myself when I was young and enjoyed them.

It's a great story for kids of all ages, as are the follow-up books. Not only do these books have Christian values, but they're also great stories and the reader enjoys the adventures with the characters he/she is reading about. Reading the next book in the series, The Lion, The Witch & The Wardrobe, was not beyond the scope of my son who was 8 or 9 at the time.

Kids who read for themselves are enhancing their literacy skills which impacts on all other aspects of learning. If you want your child to do well at school, get them interested in books! This is done by finding them a good book and reading it to them and then letting them read similar books alone.

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Carla - posted on 03/30/2013

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I had to laugh, Teresa, I, too, know the ABC book by Dr Seuss by heart ;) I had friend when we worked together at the post office and we'd be casing our mail in the mornings and reciting Dr. Seuss to each other. There was one guy there who had NEVER even HEARD of Dr. Seuss! I said 'how did you raise a child without Dr Seuss?'

I love the nonsensical books and rhymes for children--and for old people, too!

Teresa - posted on 03/29/2013

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I just saw you said it must espouse values. He was 15 months old so values was NOT what I was going for haha. sorry.

Teresa - posted on 03/29/2013

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The "B" book.

Big m

Big brown

Big brown bear

Big brown bear blue bull

big brown bear blue bull beautiful balloon

I could go on, but as you see, I read this book so much to my oldest when he was a baby that we BOTH know it by heart. He still loves it.

Jen - posted on 03/26/2013

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i love the book enemy pie. (kid invites an enemy over upon dads insistence. dad makes a pie full of rotten things. at last moment kid doesnt want enemy to eat the pie as they've become friends. turns out its apple pie.) really cute for 4-7 yrs.

Victoria - posted on 03/21/2013

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I recently read my kids Danny the Champion of the World by Roald Dahl (he wrote Charlie & the Chocolate Factory, Matilda & the BFG amongst others as well as some great kids poetry). At ages 6, 8 & 11 they all loved it & my hubby would even sit in & listen too (he's not a big reader). My youngest now 7 has recently read another of RD's books, James & the Giant Peach (by herself) & we are looking to get a copy of the BFG (Big Friendly Giant) as they all want me to read that as it was first mention in "Danny".

As a kid my Mum read the Chronicles of Narnia to my sister & I & we loved them, my kids have all read at least 2 of the 7 each.

Angela - posted on 03/21/2013

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To me, a child's ability to get on in this world is SO important. Therefore I feel ANY book where the story is gripping and lively is good - if it comes with other books in the same series that the child is inspired to read on his/her own in order to find out what happens with the regular characters. But the child needs to be "hooked" by the parent or school teacher reading the first book aloud to him/her. Reading and literacy skills are the very foundation of education!

I see the poor literacy skills of some adults and I wonder what kind of childhood they had. I'm talking about adults who are not lacking in intelligence or ability but have a poor standard of written English and wouldn't ever dream of reading for pleasure. I see it with teenagers and children as well. If their TV breaks down, it's the end of the world! They wouldn't even think about reading a book.

This is a great plan you have for your child, Rebecca Kovan - keep it up! Get him to love literature. God bless you and good luck to you and your son!

Carla - posted on 03/20/2013

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I had to delete a posting from fhefgher which was an ad. Please read our community guidelines pinned at the top of our topic page to acquaint yourselves with our community's rules.

Thank you.

Carla - posted on 02/13/2013

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I haven't heard of The Problem of Pain, I will have to look for it. The Screwtape Letters are a (fictional, of course) compilation of letters between Uncle Screwtape (which is a high up demon) and his nephew, a demon-in-training. I tried reading it to Mark as a study, but his eyes crossed and his mind wandered, so I put it back on the shelf. Shakespeare-ish writings are not everyone's cup of tea ;)

I find a lot of books have a moral to them. I LOVE Dr Seuss! And a lot of his books have a theme--like Horton Hears a Who--Horton says 'I meant what I said, and I said what I meant, an elephant's faithful, 100%' Then we would go into the meaning of being faithful and keeping your word. A lot of his writings are just silly, but our kids have loved them for generations. Kids LOVE silly! And it does the parent good as well, to let their silly side show through once in a while.

God bless all!

Angela - posted on 02/12/2013

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I haven't read the books he wrote for adults but I understand The Screwtape Letters and The Problem Of Pain are very good and insightful books.

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