Who homeschools their children?

Liz - posted on 03/20/2012 ( 37 moms have responded )

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Did you enjoy it? How many children do you have and how do you deal with teaching them the material suited for their ages? Do you have a set period of time each day that school occurs? What curriculum do you use? Did you choose to homeschool because of the lack of a good Christian school?

I have 4 children, ages 5, 3, 2, and 9 months. My 5 year old will be starting kindergarten in the fall, and I am still undecided about whether I want to homeschool him or not. We have a great Christian school at our church, but it of course costs money and driving there and back twice a day is also an issue. Any input/advice/comments is much appreciated!

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Linda - posted on 03/22/2012

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Liz, I have been homeschooling for 16 years now. I have four boys, and I homeschooled them all from the start. I have always found that school works best first thing in the morning. Especially when they were young, they started to lose concentration after lunch.



I chose to homeschool for several reasons. First of all, after teaching in the public schools, I was appalled at what I saw--the lack of morality (among teachers and students), the low standards for work, the lack of discipline---and I was in one of the better districts! There were no Christian schools around, and, even if there were, they are so expensive! I also liked the idea of spending more time with my children, and being able to give them a high quality education. In addition, I didn't know any boys who liked school, and I had four of them. I didn't want them to hate learning.



I started using just one curriculum--A Beka. However, I now use many different curriculums for different subjects and different levels. I find this works best for most homeschoolers. Also, what works for one family might not work for another. My children had an aptitude for math, and I loved A beka in elementary school---but for kid who struggled with math, many liked math-u-see. Also, I switched to Saxon math by junior high.



If you have ANY inkling of wanting to homeschool, I would STRONGLY advise you to go to the Michigan homeschooling conference in April. It will be worth the time and money! Here is the link to the Michigan conference: http://www.balancingthesword.com/homesch...



If you have any questions, feel free to ask....I've been going this a LONG time....and I have 5 more years before my youngest graduates from high school.

Claire - posted on 04/01/2012

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I home school my 3 school age children, I also have 4 children, My oldest son is 11, my oldest daughter is 10 my younger son is 7 and my baby girl just turned 1 year old. We home school because we tried public school (eck! did not turn out great!) and Christian school, which was wonderful but my oldest son has some learning struggles and they didn't have the ability to cater to his needs, he really does better with less distraction and more one on one time. So we prayed and felt God wanted us to home school all three kids. It is wonderful! but also tough!

We usually do school starting after breakfast and take brakes as needed when kids are getting restless or when we are at a good point to take a brake. have lunch then finish up school. I teach my two older ones at the same grade level and my younger one at his grade level but for some subjects like history, science and bible we do it all together. It works well. My baby usually is happy to join us at the table in her high chair and I keep her happy with snacks, books, toys or what ever will keep her busy for a bit. I am able to nurse her when needed and keep helping the kids. and there are times it is easy to give them a task and leave them to it while I change a diaper or tend to house hold tasks. I love a lot of curriculum and I think each mom needs to look into what would be best for her kids and how you believe is best for teaching. I love stuff from Abecka, Bob Jones University, and Alpha Omega Productions. I say check out web sites and see what you think. I like going to Christian Books.com they are discounted and they have a lot of things you can compare and so forth.

I would also urge you to pray pray pray. God will lead you and where he leads HE WILL provide!

Much blessings to you and I pray you will have a peace about what would work best for your family!!! ~~~

Linda - posted on 03/22/2012

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Oh...and one more thing. I also homeschooled because I didn't want my children indoctrinated with humanistic teaching, evolution, and misguided sex education. I actually think giving your children a firm foundation with God is the best reason to homeschool---above the academic ones. If I were to do it all over again, I would spend MORE time on the Bible and character training and less on academics.

Staci - posted on 02/14/2013

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I homeschool my 10-year-old son. This is our first year of homeschooling and he is in the 4th grade. He had a very difficult time in the public school he attended and although the school was putting some interventions in place to help him, he was still struggling. After some testing we figured out why - he thinks/processes information in pictures/symbols primarily. In a traditional classroom, they focus on words, written and aural. Homeschooling allows us to adjust the lessons to present them in a way that appeals to how he learns and allow him ways to communicate the information that he knows (writing is very difficult for him too).
School used to be so stressful for him that he would cry every morning begging me not to take him there. He has improved so much now that he is at home. I am not going to lie. Some days, I want to pull my hair out because it is a battle to get him through his work. (He is very stubborn and strong-willed!) But I just remind myself of all the progress he has made and how much happier he is now, and I know it is all worth it!
The curriculum we use is K12. It is online as well as book-work. It has been wonderful for him. He has joined their Astronomy club and participated in the Science fair (something he never would have considered at his other school). I try to get him started by 10am but some days (depending on what is going on we may not get started til afternoon and then will be working until 8pm). And the great thing about it is other things that we do that adds to his learning can be counted toward his attendance time as supplemental time. They take into account that learning happens all the time!
It is not a Christian curriculum but I provide him with the Christian upbringing that I want him to have by being actively involved in our church and continuing faithful practices at home.
Good luck in whatever choice you made! May God bless you and your family!

Starla - posted on 04/05/2012

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I say go for it. Their are good and bad days. Most people have the mis conception that schooling takes all day just like public school. It doesn't I spend about 2 hrs a day schooling my 5 yr old. And mostly do it when my toddler is a sleep. I also helped homeschool my pasters three kids for 3 yrs. all diffrent ages. As they get older and can read and wright own ther own for the most part it requires less of you, and can also have older ones help younger ones w sometimes. Also you will find that many times their lessions will be on the same thing. So you can sit them down together and start the lesson, then stop at the appropriate spot for the yougher one then let them do work on their own while you go into further detail for the older ones. And as far as the money their are many free and cheap homeschool resources out their that should be cheaper than private school.So no i don't have a set time every day we kinda go with the flow, but i do know fa,ilys that do have a set schedual. You will just have to experiment and see what works best for you. I like christian liberty press books, except i use saxon math.

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Lauren - posted on 04/01/2013

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I would recommend Sonlight http://www.sonlight.com/ and http://mathusee.com/ as good curriculum, although there are many others that are great too.
Try things out and find what fits you and your children. Be as structured or as autonomous as you want. Remember that learning should be about exploring and having fun! So enjoy it, and don't panic if your child is 'behind' in a subject, they are just going at there own pace which is completely okay. Some children have to take a little longer over things.

I wouldn't worry too much about curriculum at this stage, most 5 (Or 3,2 and 9 month) year olds just want to make things, learn about the the world around them and play, play, play!

Oh and here is a list of TED talks video (All on education) which are pretty cool:http://whyhomeschool.blogspot.co.uk/2012...

Hope this helps :)

Lauren - posted on 04/01/2013

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In reply to Teresa:
" Had I homeschooled him, I would not have had the knowledge and experience to see he needed help." I can sort of understand this, but you wouldn't of really needed the diagnoses because you would of work around his "problem", which he may still be just a more active child, and known him far better then the school will ever know. The great thing about home-ed is that your building amazing relationship with your child and schooling to their needs! I also understand that home schooling isn't for everyone.

Carla - posted on 03/30/2013

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Just an fyi--I was talking to my daughter yesterday further about this Core Curriculum, and she said if this bill doesn't get repealed in Michigan, she will quit work and home school. I had prayed about this, then just quietly mentioned 'what about home schooling?' Now, when I said this, I was willing (but not looking forward to) to do it myself, but with my health, and I'm no spring chicken, wasn't quite sure, realistically, whether I would be able to handle it or not. This is DEFINITELY an answer to prayer!

So, thank You, God!

Teresa - posted on 03/29/2013

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I wanted to homeschool when I was pregnant with my 9 year old, but financially it did not work out and I'm glad. Kindergarten was bad for us. We were always getting notes sent home that he was acting out and not sitting and learning like the other kids. We thought he was just an energetic child. By the middle of 1st grade we could see something was wrong. Even the other kids were looking at our son like something was wrong and he wad getting very frustrated. The headmaster and his teacher sat down with us and we decide to finally test him for ADHD which he was diagnosed with by his Dr. He had to redo 1st grade but we are glad because he is now happy and can form relationships with other kids and is enjoying school. Had I homeschooled him, I would not have had the knowledge and experience to see he needed help.

Carla - posted on 03/26/2013

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Here is the links my daughter has provided, and also below is a letter to our state representative she sent him:

http://education-curriculum-reform-gover...



this is sort of the bottom line of the study but, what caught my eye was the one and only comment to the story; from an attorney in MA… check out who has the ‘ultimate authority’ into what the teachers are teaching…. The Department of Defense… OMG….



In part of the attorney’s comment: The Common Core being unveiled now is just phase I. This report shows that the Common Core’s focus is to ultimately give broad access to all personal data to the “intelligence communities.” It also transfers ultimate authority over “whether, what and how the teachers are teaching” to the Department of Defense. In other words, the Department of Defense has come up with a clever budgetary, line-item “cost-shift” for training its personnel.



Here however is a link to the ACTUAL study and will give a reader a starting point to reading more of their studies about this issue (I’m still reading). Remind the viewer that though this is in MA, because all states signed off on the SAME standards, the information still applies, no matter what state they are in. this information needs to go viral, IMHO. Please do not however give out my work information, if anyone wants to, you can give them my cell or personal email.

Here's the letter to our state representative:

To follow up with my previous email, I just sent this to my representative: (short/sweet and to the point).



Mr. Rogers:



I have two students in a charter school that is a pilot for "Common Core State Standards". I never heard of this law passed by Governor Granholm in 2010 until about one month ago.



Within this past month, I have been doing some research into the "state standards" and have grave concerns. I have read a study that was done out of Massachusetts from individuals involved in the standards that refused to sign off on them stating that it is going to 'dumb our children down'. Not only that, it appears that the federal government has found a way to get past the FERPA laws and collect information on our children and on ourselves that they otherwise would not be able to do, and that, in my opinion, is none of their business.



I understand that a bill has been introduced to repeal the law, and I would like to beg you to continue to fight to repeal this law. This is awful. I would also like to remind you, that such in the case of the stimulus funds and the common core standards, that accepting federal funds comes with a price. With this administration, please do not be fooled. I know you are an opponent against the common core state standards, and I write to urge you to continue to fight this.


Sincerely,

Please, please inform yourselves, ladies. God bless

Carla - posted on 03/26/2013

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Yes, Linda, I believe they are setting 2014 as the target date. The charter school my grandchildren attend is already starting to align to meet these standards. And yes, the MEAP will be replaced. What is scary about this is not necessarily the criteria, but the information they want to follow each child. Religion, parental income, DNA, blood type, it's just another intrusion into our lives. New York has already signed on, so homeschoolers will be affected, even though they do not receive grant money. You Michiganders, our legislature is looking at this bill to repeal, so contact your representatives and let them know you DON'T want this for Michigan. N Korea tried this 40 years ago and found it didn't work for them, so they scraped it.

From what I understand, they aren't going to be teaching as many subjects per year, opting to concentrate on one subject at a time. This sounds good, except if you take, let's say history, in 8th grade, then don't get any more teaching, how much will the child retain? And algebra won't be addressed until freshman year. If they continue with this mind-set, geometry comes next, then trig, so there won't be any time for calculus, which a lot of degrees call for. And that is assuming they continue on this route. So what about the other subjects?

I would urge you all to look into this, study it (I admit I haven't seen the entire document, I've had kids the last couple days, and this subject has just recently stated coming to the forefront). If you don't like it, let your lawmakers know. Grant money should NOT be the driving force on what is taught to our children.

God bless, all

Linda - posted on 03/25/2013

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While Common Core State Standards ARE being implemented in many areas, it is not mandatory yet for any homeschool or private school which does not receive state money.

However, some curriculum providers, Saxon comes to mind, ARE changing their curriculum to align with these. Also, the SAT may change their test. So, while not affecting homeschoolers directly, this could eventually have an impact on homeschoolers. As usual, HSLDA has the scoop on this latest trend. You can find it here:

http://www.hslda.org/docs/news/2012/2012...

Carla - posted on 03/25/2013

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Just as an fyi--Core Curriculum (CCSS) is being implemented into all schools, public, Christian, charter and home schooled in 2014. Do a search of CCSS and find out how this will impact your children. My daughter is digging deeply into this and doesn't like what she sees. There are 4 states, Texas, Minnesota, Alaska, oh gosh, I can't remember the other one who have not signed on as yet.

God bless, all

Kristy - posted on 03/24/2013

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I currently homeschool 2 kids in first grade with the A Beka program. Come this fall I will be adding a kindergartener, I do my lessons during afternoon nap, since I run an in home daycare. I chose to homeschool because I wanted to control what my kids were learning, creation and bible stuff without having to pay for private school. I use starfall for kindergarten, A Beka has a suggested routine for multiple grades. Good luck with whatever you decide to do.

Rachael J - posted on 02/11/2013

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We are new to homeschooling this year. I have four children age range 5 to 12. Find it challenging, however it has been beneficial in many ways.

I say if you are going to do it then research it all out first! That helped us so much. We joined some networks (online and in person). We also went to a Christian Homeschooling Convention last year that offered lots of advice, Mom mentors, and of course we looked at our curriculum options.

I actually joined the throngs of other mother's out there that blog about our journey (I find it therapeutic to be honest! Even if noone were to read it I think I would continue, lol). You can find more of my homeschool posts at http://www.thelearningcurveparent.blogsp...

Hope your journey, whatever you choose, goes well!!

Rach, in Canada

Kathy - posted on 04/10/2012

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I have 3 boys, the oldest two are 15, and 14 and I have been homeschooling them for the past 3 yrs and it is going well. We use a variety of textbooks but for math my favorite is Teaching Textbooks they give really great easy to follow instruction. My youngest is 4 and though we work on some things I plan on starting Pre-K with him this fall. It will be a little different since I plan on homeschooling him all the way through so he will not be exposed to public school the way the older two were.

Carla - posted on 04/06/2012

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@Lindzee--good for you! I, too, was a teenage mom, but in those days (the days of the dinosaur), you couldn't go back to school if you were pregnant or had a child. I got my GED when I was about 30.



God bless you, sweetheart, as you plan your homeschooling. Pray for wisdom and guidance to the exact perfect curriculum for your little one.

[deleted account]

I am a teenage mother and I'll be finished with all of my High School courses soon- maybe in a few months if I finish early enough and I plan on homeschooling. :)

Stella - posted on 04/04/2012

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I have 2 chidren ages 8 and 10, and they're both homeschooled. My 10 year old daughter manages to homeschool herself via internet, but my 8 year old needs special teaching due to development problems. The advantage of being homeschooled is that if a child (like my 10 year old) is exeptional in some subjects and strugling in others, each can be at the right level and gets more attention in 'class'.

Barb - posted on 04/02/2012

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I don't want to repeat what others have posted, but we used a variety of materials. There are so many options! I believe child-led learning is best - when they show interest in something, you jump on it! That's when they'll learn best. Although I found I did have to force some things on them... so the whole unschooling thing would not have completely worked for us! :)



My understanding is the purpose of school is to make them productive members of society. Whatever that means! :) So conduct your schooling with that in mind and you can't go wrong!

Barb - posted on 04/02/2012

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Here is our experience. We had our oldest enrolled in a Christian school which was working out fine until he had a bad experience in second grade. About that time I had a friend encouraging me to be a SAHM and to homeschool. I really didn't think I was "cut out" for that and we couldn't afford for me to quit my job. We began to pray and seek the Lord. Before long out of the blue my husband received a job offer which would double his salary and allow me to quit working. It also involved a move which meant we didn't know where we'd be when school started so homeschooling was actually the clear choice. We started with third grade and as I said my son had had a bad experience in math so I have to be honest it was not easy. We really struggled. We butted heads. We fought! But we made it through and we were closer and our bond was stronger after having gone through it. I believe it was a real blessing from God ... that we didn't even know we needed. When it came time for high school he decided he wanted to go to public school, where he had good experiences and bad! (Math continued to haunt him! ) But several years after graduating he looks back and feels he had the optimum experience... from Christian school to homeschooling to HS. I feel it's best to be led by the Spirit and do what's best for you (not automatically what everyone else is doing).

Mary Anne - posted on 03/28/2012

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If you have a good school in mind that you are sure will give your child the academic stature that you cant or can with a christian foundation omg Go For it!!! Make a way. Thats just my asvice if I could back I have four also my oldest is 17 and just going down the wrong path completely it takes a villiage to raise a child I know isnt biblical but it takes more than ourselves all those parents who raised stable well rounded children from what i see didnt happen on their own there were other influences church aunts and uncles a good friend and of course mom and dad being where God needs them to be in order to give that correct guidance God is key. I also have 9 7 and 4 .I am teaching the others at home wiht an online curriculum. thats just me sorry no periods or commas

Rosie - posted on 03/28/2012

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Hi Liz,



We currently Homeschool our 10, 8, and 5 year old.



I love it! The kids will tell you they dislike seat work but love everything else. Seat work is work that you have to do at a table, like math. (Of course most days you'll find at least one of kids under the coffee table doing work :) )



The material suited for their age depends on which curriculum you choose. You could use Hearts of Dakota or Sonlight which spans multi grade levels. Or you could use workbooks like ABEKA or Alpha and Omega which use standard grade levels. Or, like us, it's a mix. Math, language arts, and reading are at grade level but history, science, art and geography are done all together.



I like to start at 9am and finish by noon. With that being said, homeschool is 24/7. If the kids are interested in something at 5pm then we research it, draw a pic, write about it. Whatever floats our boat. Yesterday we researched the Hoopoe bird because one of my kids wanted to know about it. You have to be flexible.



We use Christian Light Education as our main curriculum. (Best kept secret) It's not fancy like some curriculum and it's not for everyone but it works for us.



We have done it all. Christian school, public school and now homeschool. Christian school was like paying college tuition and it still had the same problems as public school. Crowded classrooms and a handful of kids that received all the attention because of behavioral problems. This is not the only reason we homeschool, there are many reasons that go way beyond the problems we faced in the standard education system. We just like it better and it fits our family's outlook on life. Our kids are well adjusted, smart, creative, kind, independent, and free thinking. We wanted to keep it that way.



FYI - K5 should only take about 1/2 hour a day of seat work. The rest should be things like playing, helping with cooking, reading together, entertaining younger siblings, crafts, so on and so on. I'm sure your doing most of that already! :)



Good luck, I know you'll make the right decision for your family's needs. If it turns out that it wasn't the right decision you can always change your mind. :)

Carla - posted on 03/28/2012

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I think that is awesome, Liz! I, too, feel 4 and 5 is wayyy too early to be sending a little one on a bus, or even if they walk, to someone else to shape their little minds for 8-10 hours a day. Our little grandson gets in the car when we pick him up from all-day kindergarten, we bring his 'sucky corners' (blankie) and he shoves his blankie in his mouth and is usually out before we get out of the parking lot. He's exhausted.



School, in America, first started out as a place to learn to read so they could read the Bible (this doesn't jive with the stories of our forefathers being atheists) I was just listening to Fox News, and there was a little girl on there telling about her teachers talking about stimulus, tenure (she was maybe 10-11). SHE didn't know what those words were, but the teacher was planting seeds in their little heads.



Homeschooling wasn't an option when I was raising my children, and, thankfully, they weren't getting so much of the politically-correct stuff they're getting now, but I am so grateful they put this option in place so our future children would have a chance to learn what is really important!



So, God bless you ladies. You may not realize now what the impact of your efforts and sacrifices are, but God is watching, and you will certainly be rewarded!

Liz - posted on 03/27/2012

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im in michigan too. We prpbably do about an hr of sit down stuff a day..if that:)

Liz - posted on 03/27/2012

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I homeschool. We have a 6yr old,4 yr old, 18 mo old, 3 week old. We also go to a co op 1 hr on Fridays. Best decision ever! Had nothing to do with having a good Christian school , but everything to do with my kids not being holed up all day in a building. We are outside learning and exploring, I am not for sending my kids away for over 40 hrs a week. I mean a 5 yr old needs his family not a school. We see that bus go by every eve and we are eating dinner at that time.We are always in awe at how much we have done that day and all the things we would have missed if in "school".

Rebekah - posted on 03/26/2012

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I second the HSLDA website - join! If you planning or thinking about homeschool, definitely join the HSLDA. A wealth of information, plus they have links for each state's homeschool rules, etc.



You can visit it at: http://www.hslda.org/

Linda - posted on 03/26/2012

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No matter what state you live in, if you go to www.hslda.org, you will find a link to the laws in your state (in the U.S.) They also have links to international laws and recent events. Also, I would strongly advise joining HSLDA (HomeSchool Legal Defense Association) if you do homeschool. It's only about $85/year, and they will defend you to the Supreme Court if necessary if your district hassles you about any educational issue. HSLDA is a tremendous source of information, whether you're looking for information on laws, how to homeschool through high school, special needs issues, etc.

Carla - posted on 03/26/2012

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Go online and find out what the laws are in your state, Tammy, first and foremost. Then type in homeschooling in _____ (whatever state you are in). You will find TONS of information! Linda and Rebekah have given you a couple places to start in their posts below.



God bless, honey.

Tammy - posted on 03/26/2012

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I am looking at homeschooling my son can anyone give me some advice please... How do I go about this??

Angela - posted on 03/24/2012

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My children are all grown-up. They went to ordinary school. Homeschooling is not very common in the UK. Parents who teach their kids at home have to meet stringent standards and are subject to inspections.



It seems quite popular in the US though. I've actually met a number of people who do this when I went over there.



If you can educate a child yourself effectively at home, then why not? Assuming you don't have other commitments (like having to go out & earn money to put food in their bellies!). I personally think that school/educational standards are failing. It has shocked me any number of times to meet 16 and 17 year olds that don't know either the spoken or written grammar of the English Language - not even to the standard I had at the age of 11 or 12..! Even more I get frustrated by adults who show evidence of poor educational standards, are flummoxed when they have to fill out a form, who don't know the difference between arithmetic and mathematics, who write notes to their child's school (full of spelling errors) to explain why their child has been absent - or even more telling - avoid any written communication at all because they KNOW their standards are poor. Money means everything to them but you'd be surprised how many of them don't even know how to write out a cheque! These are the same people who wouldn't dream of reading a book for pleasure of course - and therein lies the clue!



So, to be honest, I'm a bit suspicious of the ABILITY of most adults to teach kids to a satisfactory standard - the qualified teachers in the "proper" schools aren't doing so well, after all!



But if you can do this, do it well and are committed to finding the best resources, materials and some moral & practical support in doing it - then go ahead and good luck to you!

Carla - posted on 03/22/2012

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Hey fellow Michiganders! Michigan is great for school-of-choice. Liz, there are also charter schools and some of the Christian schools are tuition-free. My granddaughters attend a Christian school in Eaton Rapids tuition-free. My grandson and next year granddaughter attend a value-based charter school, which I found out is underwritten by Assembly of God in Lansing. Yes, we have to drive them and pick them up, but their parents have adjusted their shifts/starting time at work to drive them to school, then we pick up one at day care, one from charter school and keep them til Mom gets home from work. The girls attending the Christian school are picked up by Dad or a lady that goes to their church. Somehow we all make it work ;)



Thank God we still have options here! I know with the Internet there are so many resources for home schoolers that it really is a no-brainer. I applaud both you and Rebekah for not taking the easy road for your children. I am NOT happy with the public school system, and am thrilled my kids have their children out of it!



So God bless your efforts, whichever way you decide.

Rebekah - posted on 03/21/2012

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With preschool, don't force it. Let him guide what he wants to do. I make a posterboard and circle time is the same thing every time - prayer, story, review posterboard (letter, shape, number, color, vocab word, Bible story, memory verse), ABC song, counting practice, weather, calendar, and mailbox letter with vocab words. The rest of the school time is I set out a bunch of different activities from puzzles to file folder games to worksheets to coloring sheets to painting, etc. I let him choose which ones he wants to do, and for the set time period we do what he wants - then we break and will come back at it in the afternoon.



When my son gets to kindergarten time, I will start putting more of a structure to the schooling and split it up with fun stuff. But you're at home - when they get fidgety and bored - it's time to take school outside or go on a hike or go do something else to recharge their minds. Don't get stuck with "school" is only one way - it can be any way you want.



Michigan is very easy for homeschooling. No record keeping required. The only time you will want to keep records though, in case you want to homeschool through high school, is when they get to middle school, so you have transcripts for prepping for college. Michigan also has some great options for homeschoolers too if you decide to do through high school - you can send your kid to UM for classes that counts for college, but are HS classes. It's really cool. Check into the public school system - here in Genesee County is the GISD, they have all their homeschool info posted on it. It's really neat.

Liz - posted on 03/21/2012

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Thank you so much! You have encouraged me greatly! I love the idea of AM and PM school. With having 3 very active boys I think breaking up the day that way would be perfect. I also live in Michigan, so I guess I don't have to worry about having a required number of hours for school. I tried doing some preschool work with my son about a year and a half ago and just got too frustrated. I think I have changed as a parent since then, but still don't know if I will be able to handle it all. I think I will try to do some more preschool stuff with him and see how that goes. He is a very smart kid, it's just that we are both very stubborn!

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