Vaccination

[deleted account] ( 43 moms have responded )

I've seen a lot of talk about vaccinations lately. As of right now I still get my daughter vaccinated. However, with all the talk about it I'm a little nervous about vaccinating my newest baby (when it's born in september). I'm sure their are many moms like me that are not sure what information is true and what information is just crap. So I would love for everyone to post their research and opinions here.

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[deleted account]

Unless you have a VALID medical reason to not vaccinate, I believe that it's irresponsible to opt out.

Erin - posted on 03/04/2011

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The largest "scare" I saw was the connection between vaccines and Autism, which was completely 100% proved false, and the doctor who did the origninal study had so many flaws in his studies, was actually stripped of his licence and can no longer practice medicine in Britain. If you do proper research on official sites, and you dont listen to the gossiping natter you read all over the internet, you will find that there are minimal risks to children regarding vaccines. Your only issues would be allergies, and most vaccines have backup plans for reactions. Some kids get a fever or a rash from them, which are temporary, and extremely favorable if you look at the big picture. A minimal possibility of a fever/rash, or pertussis?
A cranky baby for the day, or meningitis?
My kid has all her shots, and never had a reaction or an issue. My baby due in July will be getting all his shots too. Im not talking about like, flu shots or that H1N1 shot, I decided against those, and just relied on my kids immune system. They gotta build them up somehow! We used to eat dirt! Now people are using sanitizer 100 times a day and wont touch a shopping cart without bleaching it. Vaccines are wonderful, but let your kid build up his resistances too!

Allison - posted on 07/21/2011

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all i'm going to say is this, most of the diseases we vaccinate against are not irraticated. it only takes one kid to make awhole bunch sick. Not all kids are old enough for all vaccinations so if one mom desides that the rubella vaccine isn't neccisary and her seven year old (who will most likely end up ok) gets it then a whole bunch of babies get it who aren't old enough for the vaccine after contact with that kid and either die or become brain damaged, that threat is a good enough reason to get them. notice the lack of infant and child deaths since vaccines in our country(ies) and then look at certain countries in Africa and other poor countries that don't have vaccines. Vaccinate people its not just your kid your harming or protecting its every other kid they come into contact with. But i do agree the flu and Chicken pox vaccines seem a bit much. maybe when my boys are about ten i'll think about chicken pox vaccine

Christina - posted on 03/04/2011

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I have autistic children, and I vaccinate :) I want my children protected against disease that other countries still have children dying from that we now have vaccinations from. Since America is visited/invaded by so many foreigners and illegal immigrants who are not vaccinated and some are carrying these diseases, they are bringing them back into America.
Also, I have a friend who was adopted at a year old from another country. She contracted Polio before she was adopted and has been partially paralyzed since infancy. It is just not worth the risk to me.

Jane - posted on 09/26/2011

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Actually we do know a lot about what causes cancer, but it depends on the cancer. It is more than one disease.

There is a huge genetic component to many cancers (some breast cancers, and colon cancer, for example). There are specific chemicals that we know cause cancers of specific types (for example, benzene). There are certain viruses that cause some cancers (cervical cancer, some cases of leukemia). There are lifestyle choices that can lead to cancer (smoking, drinking alcohol, tanning, being overweight, skipping screening tests, to name a few). There are environmental exposures that can cause cancer (pesticides, radiation). There are prepared foods that can cause cancer (grilled, smoked or salted meat, hydrogenated oils, foods cooked at high temperature),. And even natural, organic foods can cause cancer (beans contain pyrimidins (isouramile, divicine), peas contain nitriles and toxins, potato, millet, cassava and sweet potato contain cyanogenic substances that turn into cyanide, rhubarb contains emodine, parsley, celery, dill and fennel contain furocoumarins, and cacao, nutmeg, laurel, anis, mace, black pepper and ginger contain natural carcinogins. And then there are aflotoxins, found in grains, meat, milk, cheese, shelled nuts. Plus, many foods can pick up carcinogens from the soil in which they are grown, including arsenium, cadmium and lead.

Some of these are under our individual control but some are not.

The other problem is that cancer is not one unified disease. It is many different diseases that present as tumors in specific organs. The big problem is when these tumors go undetected so that there is too much tumor to remove, especially if it has seeded itself throughout the body.

The third problem is that we don't have a good way yet to be able to record all cancer-causing factors that are active in one individual that could interact with some aspect of that individual, so we can't easily pick out who has an undiscovered cancer or who is certain to develop one. They are working on blood tests that will identify folks who have cancer, similar to the PSA tests used to assess someone's risk of prostate cancer, but those aren't fully tested yet. Instead we have a number of different screening tests that depend on the individual being able to tell the doctor something that makes it justifiable to insurance to pay for it, and others that depend on the individual's willingness to go for the test (how many of us look forward to the annual PAP smear?)

If someone is REALLY concerned about protecting themselves then they need to eat only certain organic foods stored properly and grown in clean soil, live in houses open to the outside air and located in a rural area where there is neither agriculture nor industry (and never have been), and do some sort of job that will keep them from being exposed to carcinogens of any sort, including solvents, paint, pesticides, plastics, dust, ink, and more. That person needs to avoid all plastics and petroleum products, artificial preservatives, artificial colorings, cleaning products other than simple soap and maybe vinegar, In addition, that individual needs to be aware of all relatives an ancestors who have had any sort of cancer.

The risks from vaccination are minor when compared to all of these other risks, many of which don't even have the advantage of preventing disease.

And breastfeeding protects babies from disease if the mother's body has protections from disease. So if mom was vaccinated as a baby, her immune protections will be passed on to the baby, at least as long as the baby is breastfed.

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Jane - posted on 09/26/2011

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Officially doctors will tell you that is a cancer of unknown origin, but it behaves a lot like ovarian cancer. In fact, about 15% of ovarian cancers are probably actually peritoneal cancer.

There is a link in women who have peritoneal cancer to genetics (the BRCA1/2 mutation). You might want to talk to a doctor about being checked for that gene, especially if any other women in your family have had breast or ovarian cancer.

It is very rarely found in men, but interestingly enough the scientist Stephen Jay Gould died from it.

Merry - posted on 09/26/2011

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Jane, do you have any idea what causes peritoneal cancer?that's what my mom died of when I was 15.

[deleted account]

yeah, I was just curious. I know we don't know what causes cancer. I breastfeed my babies! lol

To me it seems like shots are natural. It's a natural disease they put in you so you develop immunity to it. The same thing that happens when you catch the disease and develop immunity to it that way. Now I DO think they put alot of crap in the shots that they probably shouldn't(which your right may cause cancer, you never know) and I wish they didn't. But I don't have the degree to know if those things are really necessary or not. But since I really don't have the knowledge to make my own vaccinations then I guess I can't get it exactly the way I want.

Please correct me if I'm wrong cause I don't know a lot about vaccination. This is just my understanding of vaccinations.

Merry - posted on 09/26/2011

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She thinks screwing with our bodies natural immune system makes it go into overdrive and it can mess it all up and cancer can come from chemicals we use or inject or eat.
We don't know what causes cancer so I guess her idea is as good as any. She lives very naturally and organically and wholisticly etc. She was never vaccinated and her health also convinces her that vax are unnecessary.
She thinks breastfeeding prevents most diseases.
Which is partially true, not breastfeeding does increase baby's risk of cancer and diabetes and infections. Breastmilk has killed cancer cells.
Idk! There's alot of info and not alot of facts.
We don't know what causes cancer so for all we know it could be the vaccines.

Jane - posted on 09/26/2011

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While the prevalent strain of flu may be a guess each year, it is an educated guess.

BTW, the flu can and does kill people. Typically, most healthy people with good immune systems will feel miserable but will survive, but every year still some people die. When I was a child a friend of mine's father died from the flu - he was healthy and 36 years old and it killed him in only two days, before he could even get a doctor's appointment. And it wasn't even the current H1N1 flu.

If you have other health problems, especially involving the heart and/or lungs, the flu shot is a good idea. If you are elderly, the flu shot is a good idea. If you are in a job where you have a lot of human contact, the flu shot is a good idea.

However, if you are a SAHM with children too young to go to school and your husband isn't at high risk of bringing it home, you can probably gamble that you won't get the flu. Just be prepared in case you or someone else in your house does. It is a miserable disease, with body aches, high fevers, and congestion, and it will tear your heart out if your child gets it because antibiotics will not do any good at all. The flu is a virus, not a bacteria.

[deleted account]

In all fairness that could be true. Is there any proof? Why is whooping cough back coincidentally at the same time a lot of people start opting out of vaccinating.

Why does she think vaccinations cause cancer?

Jane - posted on 09/26/2011

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What reliable, duplicatible research conducted by trained scientists who adhere to the scientific method shows is that WITHOUT vaccination, more children get sick, have complications, and die from the diseases prevented by the vaccines. In modern countries such as Japan and parts of the US, when vaccination rates drop because of public fears, disease rates, complication rates, and deaths from these diseases go up.

That means vaccines help keep the vast majority of people healthy. Fewer people have bad reactions from vaccines than would die from disease in an unvaccinated population.

In other words, get your kids the vaccinations.

Merry - posted on 09/26/2011

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Yup, just a belief. Idk what I believe because there's way too much conflicting evidense about vaccines. Partvof me thinks just not screw with nature, other part knows modern medicine has saved lives.
So I'm undecided

Jane - posted on 09/26/2011

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There is a big difference between what someone believes, and what has been shown in reliable, duplicatible research conducted by trained scientists who adhere to the scientific method.

Unless your good friend is a trained MD and/or PhD with a specialty in immunology and public health, then her belief is simply a belief, and not a fact or even a tested hypothesis.

Merry - posted on 09/26/2011

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I have a good friend who believes that vaccines really don't stop diseases, that other stuff like modern cleanliness etc is why these diseases are gone. So she thinks if everyone quit vaccinating nothing would change except alot less cancer and diseases.

[deleted account]

I'm still confused why some people are against vaccines...if the argument is that it isn't necessary because there are not that many cases of the disease then my question is: Isn't that why the disease is unheard of now days? Because of vaccines?

What would happen if everyone stopped getting vaccinated? You don't believe that people would be dying from disease?

Why would you want to risk peoples lives by not vaccinating your kids?

Daniell - posted on 08/12/2011

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I truly believe in immunizations/vaccinations for the diseases like chicken pox, polio, etc, because those shots are practically guaranteed that my kid will not get sick. I follow the recommended shots from the doctor/health dept. I do not agree with the flu vaccination because to ready the vaccination, the "vaccination people" guess which strains will be prevalent and make the vaccination based on that. If they were wrong about the flu strain that is active during flu season - then the flu vaccination you have would be useless.

Crystal - posted on 07/28/2011

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All I can say is my kids have all their shots. And the parents who don't get them are playing Rushion Rullet with their kids life. It's like giving them a gun that holds 6 bullets and saying they have less of a chance getting shot. It's only a 1 in 6 after all.

Jane - posted on 07/21/2011

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In the US the last case of "wild" polio was in 1979, but Burkina Faso has just reported one, Nigeria has had 20 this month, and there are many places in India and Africa where polio is still extant in the wild. All you need is one person to be exposed and get on a plane to the US, meet up with your unvaccinated child, and there you go.

Small chance of this? Maybe, but when it comes to your own child? Better safe than sorry.

Allison - posted on 07/21/2011

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to the lady who said things like polio are gone from the west so she didn't let her kid get that vaccination i'm only gonna say this, it only takes one person who has it to come into contact with your child. Polio is not gone from the world just from one small sector of it. i hope your kid never goes anywhere or meets anyone who lived in a country where polio is present. also as far as the hep shots your nuts do you realize its not that hard to get hep?! all it takes is one unfortunate incident and your child will have it. My friend's mom got hep i think b from a needle when she accidently pricked herself when she was becoming a nurse. just saying you chose not to protect your kid from these things that arent that hard to get. It only takes one interaction and your kid is in trouble

Ally - posted on 07/20/2011

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Very true laura! No cases of wild polio...not one..ever in over a quarter century...way more people have been struck and killed by lightning during that time period!

When doctors were dishing out the OPV (oral polio vaccine) which they told everyone was very safe...it caused approx 10 cases of vaccine related polio infections per year in the US...which is why it was pulled off the market in 2000 and switched ti IPV...ooops guess we can't belive everything these super smart doctors tell us and should just let them inject whatever they want to into our kids...no thanks!

Merry - posted on 07/15/2011

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Pretty sure their kids are more likely to be struck by lightning then catch polio......it's so very very unheard of it makes the news if any polio is diagnosed!
I'm sure they accept the risks associated with not vaccinating as well as the risks of thunderstorms :)

Jane - posted on 07/15/2011

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Just wait until they lose a kid to polio. My Dad's best friend was one such, and my first serious boyfriend.

And if someone is vaccinated yet still comes down with the disease typically their cases are much lighter than the unvaccinated folks.

Merry - posted on 07/15/2011

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Nope, they don't believe vaccination prevent diseases at all.
Honestly, over half of people involved in recent outbreaks were vaccinated anyways, so it's obviously not great protection.....

Merry - posted on 07/15/2011

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I have a friend whose family doesn't vaccinate, she's third gen and her kids are fourth gen non vax. No issues, no diseases, no deaths.
She doesn't believe vax do any good, and they hate the ingredients and side effects.
They seem quite knowledgeable and informed
Idk, I'm still figuring this one out myself :)

Ally - posted on 04/26/2011

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Krista,
We will def be getting the hep b vaccine at some point. The virus however is not transmitted via casual contact like sharing items and although the virus can be present in the saliva of infected people the chance of spreading it by sharing drinks or something is such a remote possibility it's not something that i am concerned about esp since there hasn't been documentation of transmission via saliva. Maybe if she was visciously bit by an infected person or repeatedly....but truthfully even that would be a stretch.

I can assure you this is not something i take lighly i have read more studies vaccine package inserts and clinical trial reviews than i can even count. My last research priject in nursing school was on the safety and efficacy of childhood vaccinations and i'm glad to know there are open minded people out there like you who are doing their research as well :)

Ally - posted on 04/26/2011

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Krista,
We will def be getting the hep b vaccine at some point. The virus however is not transmitted via casual contact like sharing items and although the virus can be present in the saliva of infected people the chance of spreading it by sharing drinks or something is such a remote possibility it's not something that i am concerned about esp since there hasn't been documentation of transmission via saliva. Maybe if she was visciously bit by an infected person or repeatedly....but truthfully even that would be a stretch.

I can assure you this is not something i take lighly i have read more studies vaccine package inserts and clinical trial reviews than i can even count. My last research priject in nursing school was on the safety and efficacy of childhood vaccinations and i'm glad to know there are open minded people out there like you who are doing their research as well :)

Krista - posted on 04/26/2011

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Ally, please reconsider the Hep B shot. Yes, it can be sexually transmitted, but it can also be transmitted through any bodily fluids or sharing of personal items. And how often do kids take drinks off of their friends bottle of juice or soda?

As well, while polio is virtually eradicated in the western world, it does still exist in Africa and Asia. And considering how much people travel nowadays, small outbreaks HAVE occurred in the developed world among unvaccinated populations. So...something to consider.

I do want to commend you, however. A lot of parents skip MMR altogether, thinking that it's not serious. And while serious cases in children are rare, you're correct in that those diseases are MUCH more serious if contracted when older.

I have no issue with people delaying vaccinations, or spreading them out. I also have no issue with people skipping vaccinations if they have a family history of severely adverse reactions to them.

My issue is with people who deliberately ignore all of the information from reputable, peer-reviewed medical studies, choosing instead to base their decision on stuff they read on www.vaccinesarethedevil.blogspot.com.

Ally - posted on 04/25/2011

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We evaluted every shot individually and decided which ones we felt were necessary and which were not for our child. There are some vaccines that are important in infancy such as the DTaP and Prevnar since the bacterias that cause the illnesses the vaccine prevents are very common and if acquired by an infant can be severe.
It makes sense to get these shots when your babies are most vulnerable (our daughter got her DTaP at 4 month and prevnar at 6 months)

It also makes sense to do. Ne shot at a time or maybe two if they have already had them individually and done fine with it. That way if there is a reaction you will know exactly which vaccine is to blame instead of the whole 5 or 6 vaccines in one nonsense...what do you do after a bad reaction from those....never get any more shots?

Our daughter is up to date on her HIB,prevnar, and dtap vaccines we have not had her vaccinated against normal childhood illnesses that are almost always benign and pass quickly (chicken pox, mmr) we just finished with the chicken pox a couple weeks ago...my daughter got it right after her 3rd bday and it was a breeze....maybe one bad night as soon as they crusted over and it didnt slow her down a bit. Soooo glad I went with my gut and declined that shot...now i never have to worry about her getting infected as an adult...if she does not come down with the other childhood illnesses by about age ten we will most likely vaccinate then since the diseases are much more severe in adults.

She is also not vaccinated for polio and Hep b bc polio has been considered eradicated from the entire western for over 20 years (only cases of non wild polio were reported during this time and was caused by the Oral polio vaccine which is why they have now switched to the injected vaccine and no cases have been reported) if a disease is gone i don't feel the need to vaccinate my child for it. Hep b is an STD and we will re-evaluate that as she becomes a teenager...a baby should not be at risk for hep b unless the mother is positive....so we felt comfortable holding off on that as well.

Do your research , read product inserts and educated yourself on what you are putting into your child and weigh the risks versus benefits...if you plan on delaying or skipping many vaccines it is very important to protect your child and breastfeed for and extended period of time so they get your antibodies which provided significant protection for about 6 months.

Good luck :)

Jane - posted on 04/12/2011

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When you plan to become pregnant you can always have a blood titer done. That will show whether your immunity is up to date. I did this when we started planning to get pregnant and discovered I was still immune to chicken pox and measles (I got the measles vaccine the first year they ever had it) but not to German Measles. I got a German Measles shot and so was set.

Frances - posted on 04/12/2011

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When they first came out with the chicken pox shot, they said one shot would cover you for life. Now they say you need a booster. Chicken pox if contacted during pregnancy, is at least as bad as measles. For this reason, my daughters never had the chicken pox shot and caught the disease instead. I was afraid the shot would wear off and they would catch chicken pox whenever they got pregnant. It is very rare to have chicken pox twice.

Jane - posted on 04/12/2011

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I have gotten all the various vaccinations myself, and I vaccinated my kids on the suggested schedule. Unfortunately for my kids they came down with chicken pox just before the vaccine existed so they didn't get that one. I will tell you that nursing a 3 year old and then a 1 year old through chicken pox is miserable work. They itch but you can't let them scratch plus they feel just plain miserable. If the timing were better I would definitely have gotten them the shot.

So far there are no proven links between vaccination and autism, vaccination and SIDS, or vaccination and any condition really. Because of vaccination, someone who has two children has an excellent chance for them both to grow to adulthood. In the "good old days" before vaccination, families might have 8 or 10 or more children but only two or three might make it to adulthood. The things they are vaccinating against are bad diseases. Whooping Cough, Polio, Tuberculosis, Tetanus, Meningitis, and others that used to kill lots and lots of babies are now uncommon thanks to vaccines. My dad recently reminded me of the time when he was about 6 and his friend developed a bad headache. Two days later his friend was dead from polio. How often does that happen today? Basically, it doesn't. The whole reason is that we vaccinate against these diseases.

So I say vaccinate! Or you risk losing a child to disease.

Jane - posted on 04/12/2011

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I have gotten all the various vaccinations myself, and I vaccinated my kids on the suggested schedule. Unfortunately for my kids they came down with chicken pox just before the vaccine existed so they didn't get that one. I will tell you that nursing a 3 year old and then a 1 year old through chicken pox is miserable work. They itch but you can't let them scratch plus they feel just plain miserable. If the timing were better I would definitely have gotten them the shot.

So far there are no proven links between vaccination and autism, vaccination and SIDS, or vaccination and any condition really. Because of vaccination, someone who has two children has an excellent chance for them both to grow to adulthood. In the "good old days" before vaccination, families might have 8 or 10 or more children but only two or three might make it to adulthood. The things they are vaccinating against are bad diseases. Whooping Cough, Polio, Tuberculosis, Tetanus, Meningitis, and others that used to kill lots and lots of babies are now uncommon thanks to vaccines. My dad recently reminded me of the time when he was about 6 and his friend developed a bad headache. Two days later his friend was dead from polio. How often does that happen today? Basically, it doesn't. The whole reason is that we vaccinate against these diseases.

So I say vaccinate! Or you risk losing a child to disease.

Billie Jo - posted on 04/12/2011

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My son isnt vaccineted and I'm 24 I haven't none of my sisters/parents have. We are all just fine and we actually don't get sick even with the normal flu as much as most. We haven't for religious reasons so when schools and daycares have needed we have been exempt from needing them. So when it comes to schooling you might have a hard time getting them in bc some are required by law so thats also something to look at. Maybe see whats required and do what's nessasary and leave all the rest out :)

Jennifer - posted on 03/23/2011

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My daughter (18) has had all of her vaccinations as I did when I was growing up. If I had a child today, I might consider waiting until they were a little older, say 2 years, before having them vaccinated to give their immune systems time to mature.

Jennifer - posted on 03/23/2011

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My daughter (18) has had all of her vaccinations as I did when I was growing up. If I had a child today, I might consider waiting until they were a little older, say 2 years, before having them vaccinated to give their immune systems time to mature.

Frances - posted on 03/22/2011

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My family doctor suspected a link between vaccines and SIDS. He did not start vaccinations until six months of age. The baby is older and stronger then. Besides, if you are nursing the baby gets immunities from your milk.

Erika - posted on 03/21/2011

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well i have given all vacinations to my daughter....and i still will give what ever vacinations she needs....and i have got all the same vacinations when i was young that she is getting now. to me its not worth the risk and i would never forgive myself if something happened and i could have prevented it....well thats my opinion anyway.

CA - posted on 03/16/2011

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I think some vaccinations are downright unnecessary (like flu and chicken pox, for example) - our kids' immune systems can handle those! However, I think some vaccines are good to have.
My only concern is how MANY vaccine kids are given is such a SHORT period of time. Because of this, I delayed starting vaxing with my baby until she was 6 months (their immune systems aren't even fully developed until then anyway!) and then I insisted on a alternate vax schedule - a lot less rigorous. One vax at a time, spread out over longer periods of time... and I request mercury-free versions of all vaxes we give her.
We'll see how it goes over time (as she is only 7 months old, and has only received 2 shots total at this point!)

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