Animal Testing

Katherine - posted on 11/17/2010 ( 38 moms have responded )

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So the going green thread got me thinking about animal testing. What's your take on that? Do you know that 99% of our cosmetics, detergents, cleaners etc....are animal tested?

I think it's horrible. It's almost impossible to avoid though.....

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LaCi - posted on 11/17/2010

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Humans don't have to have things tested on them. we can grow human tissue. Many cosmetic companies have devoted significant funds to advancing this type of research. Not only is it animal friendly, but it's more productive since it is human tissue.

Animal testing is disgusting, I can deal with medical research, but I draw the line after that. If you need to test it, quite frankly I don't want it. Have you seen the parameters they have set for how many animals need to die off before a product is "unsafe?"

Kate CP - posted on 11/18/2010

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O.o

PETA has equated slaughter houses with the holocaust. Their fearless leader is against any type of animal testing BUT...she uses insulin that has been tested on and developed with the use of animal by-products. Many of their protesters are violent offenders who have threatened bombings and assaults on individuals they deem a threat to animals. They want pets to be abolished. They think animals should have the right to vote. One year they sent out garbage bags and toe tags to people who got puppies or kittens as part of a "new pet package". And their shelter euthanizes more animals per year than the ASPCA. I agree they have the right to express their beliefs and be advocates but to say they're not militant or a little mixed up is beyond me.

Katherine - posted on 11/17/2010

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Sorry it's so long, I just wanted everyone to see what P&G makes.

Sharon - posted on 11/17/2010

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I'm against testing cosmetics on animals.

Genuine medical testing is ok. I don't like it and insist that all the humanity possible be utilised for those tests.

There are entirely to many fucked up animal "tests" that serve utterly NO PURPOSE and are cruel beyond belief. THOSE I do not agree with.

This conversation has been closed to further comments

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[deleted account]

The problem with not using anything that has previously been tested on animals is that great products will stop being used. It is like suggesting that medical procedures gained from the holocaust should not be used because people suffered for those findings. Obviously we now know that the methods used to discover many things are completely wrong but that doesn't make the findings any less significant and if we stop using the products makes the lives lost a complete and utter waste.

Now I feel that products such as cosmetics don't need to be tested on animals, but medicines will always have a certain need to be tested and animals will always be necessary for that, the only solution to that I can see would be a situation where clones and farmed humans were used to test on which would be beyond wrong.

[deleted account]

some products will write that the product hasn't been tested on animals, yet at the same time the actual ingredients is said product may have been yrs ago.

LaCi - posted on 11/18/2010

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I do feel that in the years to come more things will be tested on human tissues rather than animals. Its a more effective form of testing, and we're only just now really breaking the barriers. In no time, it will be commonplace and there will be no excuse for using animals, even for medicinal purposes. We just aren't quite there yet.


In the peta list it says bath and body works does not test on animals, yet on their products it says "this finished product was not tested on animals" So I'm a bit confused. If they had to throw that in surely they are testing on animals. I stopped using it when I noticed the wording on the label.

To my knowledge, none of my products are tested on animals. The boyfriend uses Dove soap though, so we do have one unilever thing in the house. :/ Dunno if I can sway him from that.

Kate CP - posted on 11/18/2010

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Yes, they did...but that's what South Park does. Did you see the episode about Mormonism or Scientology? Hilarious! :D

Katherine - posted on 11/18/2010

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They are on the extreme side. I remember a South Park episode on them.
The creators of South Park REALLY made some digs.

[deleted account]

PETA has a right to express beliefs and advocate, just as we all do here. they've done a lot of good on a lot of stuff. don't think militant, just think great marketers for there philosphies. they have many other stands aside from medical testing.

Kate CP - posted on 11/18/2010

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And it's a sad, sad fact. However, there is not a shortage of lab rats in the world.

Katherine - posted on 11/18/2010

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The sad thing about them injecting rats is that they are bred for that purpose :( Even when I was doing my trials in psychology JUST to see if they had preferences in music(don't ask) right after, they would destroy them.

Kate CP - posted on 11/18/2010

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PETA is frickin' INSANE. Anything PETA stands for I almost automatically am happy to do just because they are a bunch of militant nuts. Obviously I'm not keen on animal abuse, puppy mills, torture, or cosmetic testing done on animals. But medical trials for things like insulin, heart medication, and cancer treatments you can bet your ass I'd rather them inject that stuff in a rat before a human.

Katherine - posted on 11/18/2010

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Ok, it may not be as HIGH as 99%, but P&G is a Fortune 500 Company and they own or have the rights to many products. I read that in 2001 80 million animals were killed in the name of science :/
It's 9 years later and more animals later.
I forget what the other huge monopoly is, but really if you see the list P&G even makes dog and cat food and appliances.

LaCi - posted on 11/18/2010

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I can't find the text. If I do I'll paste it. It's *something* like the 80-20 or 70-30 rule. The point at which the high number of animals dies is considered the unsafe dosage. while I'm thinking "but 60% dead is okay??" I don't want any of them to die from the chemicals in my hair balm.. thanks.



Peter Singer- Animal Liberation, details animal testing procedures, why it isn't valuable, the suffering of the animals, on and on. Poor kitty. :/

[deleted account]

Some companies try to follow no animal testing policy. They use human cells and tissue to test there product but before reaching the production line they get met with government policies that require them to prove the product is safe. As much as they try to go an ethical route, higher powers intercede.

Petra - posted on 11/18/2010

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PETA's website has product listings show companies who do and do not test on animals. I've gone by their research when deciding to avoid companies that test on animals. Most of the time it is not necessary - we have the ability to grow human tissue and get more accurate results without harming any sentient creature. Medical testing is a whole other can of worms - some really horrific things are done to animals in the name of science and I truly wish there were better alternatives. It is unavoidable when it comes to medicine - but makeup, cleaning products? There are animal friendly options out there and its not hard to find out who they are if you do your homework.

[deleted account]

Sorry but I'm not giving up my nice 'n' easy hair colourants, I've tried alternatives but none have worked properly on my hair.

[deleted account]

environmental working group (can google to find site) has a spin-off site from main one that allows you to punch in a cosmetic/product and find out how bad it is. also lists better ones. there is a rating system and you can check in depth if you want to as to what makes the productbad.

I figure if anything doesn't list the ingred (ie cleaning products, laundry deterg and still say they are environmentally sound (i.e. clorox and green works) they are not.

Katherine - posted on 11/17/2010

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HOLY CRAP!!!! This is the list of Proctor and Gamble products:





Ariel laundry detergent

Bounty paper towels, sold in the United States and Canada

Braun, a small-appliances manufacturer specializing in electric razors, coffeemakers, toasters, and blenders

Charmin bathroom tissue and moist towelettes

Crest toothpaste

Dawn dishwashing detergent

Downy fabric softener and dryer sheets

Lenor fabric softener

Duracell batteries and flashlights

Gain fresh smelling liquid and powder laundry detergents, liquid fabric softener and dryer sheets

Gillette, variety of razors for men and women, shaving cream for men, body wash for men, shampoo for men, deoderant and anti-perspirant for men

Head & Shoulders shampoo

Iams dog and cat foods

Olay Personal and beauty products

Oral-B inter-dental products

Pampers & Pampers Kandoo disposable diapers and moist towelettes

Pantene haircare products

Pringles potato crisps and wheat crisps

Tide variety of liquid and powder laundry detergents, stain remover for laundry and stain remover pen

Wella hair care products

rejoice shampoo

[edit] Other current brand details

This list is incomplete; you can help by expanding it.

Ace Laundry Detergent & Additives

Align GI Healthcare (Probiotics)

Alldays Feminine hygiene

Always Feminine hygiene

Aussie Haircare (shampoos/conditioners/styling aids)

Blue Stratos Popular Cologne

Bold2in1 Laundry Detergent

Bounce fabric-softener sheet for dryers

Camay, a lightly-scented bath soap

Cascade dishwasher detergent

Cheer laundry detergent, available in powder and liquid

Christina Aguilera Luxury fragrance for young women

Clairol, a personal care products division of Procter & Gamble that makes hair coloring, hair spray, shampoo, hair conditioner, and styling consumables

CoverGirl, the largest color cosmetics brand in the U.S., with distribution in Canada, United Kingdom, Australia, and Switzerland as well

Crest, variety of anti-cavity and whitening toothpastes

Daz Laundry Detergent

Doctor's Dermatologic Formula, skincare

Dolce & Gabbana colognes

Dreft laundry detergent. It was actually the first synthetic detergent used for delicate clothing and dishes when introduced in 1933 from Procter & Gamble.

Dunhill Luxury Fragrance for men

Era, Procter & Gamble's first liquid laundry detergent

Escada Luxury Fragrance for women

Eukanuba premium dog and cat foods

Fairy dishwashing liquid & toilet soap

Febreze odor eliminator

Fibresure Vegetable Supplements

Fixodent Denture adhesive

Flash Household Cleaning

Gain fresh smelling liquid dishwashing detergents

Gleem toothpaste

Glide Dental floss

Gucci colognes

Herbal Essences Haircare

High Endurance body washes, deodorants by Old Spice

Hugo Modern, Luxury Fragrances

Hugo Boss colognes

Iams dog and cat food

Infacare Baby Bath

Ivory soap

Joy dishwashing liquid

Lacoste colognes

Luvs disposable diapers

Max Factor cosmetics sold in Europe

Metamucil Healthcare (GI: bulk fiber)

Natura Pet Products brands, which include Innova, Evo, California Natural, Karma, Healthwise and Mother Nature

Mr. Clean household cleaning products

Nice n Easy hair color product

Nicky Clarke hair products

Old Spice colognes, deodorants, body washes, body sprays

Pepto-Bismol digestive medicine

Prilosec OTC (Heartburn medicine)

Puffs tissues

PUR Water Filtration

Safeguard anti-bacterial soap and liquid anti-bacterial hand soap

Scope mouthwash

Secret deodorant

Sebastian Professional hair cosmetics

Silvikrin Haircare

SK-II beauty products

Swiffer cleaning products

Tampax tampons

Tip powder laundry detergent

Viakal Cleaning products

Vicks Healthcare (Cough & Cold)

Zest deodorant body bar and body washes

Zirh Men's Skin Care

[edit] Divested brands

Brands owned by Procter & Gamble in the past, but since divested:



Actonel (pharmaceutical division was spun off into Warner Chilcott in 2009)

Aleve, an NSAID drug, acquired by Bayer in 1997

Asacol

Biz Originally an enzyme-based laundry pre-soak, later a detergent booster, then an all-fabric bleach, sold to Redox Brands in 2000

Cinch, an all-purpose glass and surface cleaner, was sold to Shansby Group, a San Francisco investment firm, later acquired by Prestige Brands

Chloraseptic, throat medicine and lozenges sold to Prestige Brands.

Clearasil, over-the-counter acne medicine sold to Boots Healthcare.

Coast, bar-soap brand sold to Dial Corporation in 2000. Dial now owned by Henkel

Comet, long-time P&G brand of cleanser owned now by Prestige Brands

Crisco (vegetable oil and shortening) sold to The J.M. Smucker Co.

Crush/Hires/Sun Drop carbonated soft drinks (sold to Cadberry Schweppes in late 1980s)

Dantrium, sold to JHP Pharmaceuticals and SpePharm

Dryel home dry-cleaning kit sold to The OneCARE Company.

Duncan Hines packaged cake mixes, sold to Aurora Foods (now Pinnacle Foods) in 1998

Folgers coffee was acquired by The J.M. Smucker Co. based in Orrville, Ohio in June 2008.

Hawaiian Punch, now owned by Dr Pepper/7up

Infusium 23 (shampoos/conditioners) - sold to Helen of Troy's Ideill Labs unit in March 2009

Jif (peanut butter) -- divested by Procter & Gamble in a spin-off to their stockholders, followed by an immediate merger with The J.M. Smucker Company in 2002

Lava, sold to WD-40 in 1999

Millstone coffee was acquired by The J.M. Smucker Co. as part of its Folger's coffee acquisition in Orrville, Ohio in June 2008.

Monchel, a beauty soap

Noxzema, a skin cream and beauty products line, sold to Alberto-Culver Co. in 2008

Oxydol sold to Redox Brands in 2000; Oxydol was P&G's first popular laundry soap, then later became a laundry detergent after Tide was introduced in 1946.

Pert Plus, introduced in 1987 as the first "2-in-1" shampoo incorporating conditioner in one bottle. It was the market leader in 1992 with a 10.1 percent share. Now in a "declining stage", sold to Innovative Brands, LLC in July 2006. The original Pert was introduced in 1979, but declined to less than 2% before Pert Plus turned it into a 2-in-1 product.

Prell shampoo, sold to Prestige Brands International in 1999

Spic and Span, now owned by The Spic and Span Company, a division of Prestige Brands

Sunny Delight orange drink, spun off in 2004

Sure, anti-perspirant/deodorant line was sold in October 2006 to brand-development firm Innovative Brands

Lilt Home Permanents, Including "Push Button" Lilt, The First "Foam-In" Home Permanent In A Can. Sold To Schwartzkopf/DEP in 1987, later discontinued

Salvo, a brand of detergent tablets which was sold from the early 1960s up to the mid-1970s

Star Margarine and Dari Creme, originally from P&G Philippines, was sold to San Miguel Corporation in 1994

Thrill, a peach-scented brand of dishwashing liquid, discontinued in the mid-1970s.

Top Job all-purpose cleaner, merged into the Mr. Clean brand in 1990.

ThermaCare brand heat wraps, sold to medical company Wyeth in 2008

Vizir, was a detergent, mostly sold in Europe

Wondra, a brand of hand lotion discontinued in the late 1980s

[edit] Vanished brands

Brands owned by Procter & Gamble in the past, but since phased out:



Agro Laundry Soap

Both Banner and White Cloud toilet tissues were merged with the company's best known bathroom tissue, Charmin. White Cloud, sold under the Kruger Products LTD brand based in Canada, can still be found in many U.S. supermarket and discount stores.

Big Top, a brand of peanut butter before Jif made its debut.

Bonus, a brand of laundry detergent that had towels in every box.

Chipso, flaked and granulated soap, last made in the early-mid 1940's.

Citrus Hill, orange juice drink last made in 1992

Drene (a.k.a. Special Drene, Royal Drene), liquid shampoo. First shampoo made from synthetic detergent.

Duz, a powdered laundry soap and later, a powdered laundry detergent which had glassware and plates in each box

Encaprin, the first competitor to Tylenol in the ibuprofen-capsule pain-reliever market. In 1984, it beat Advil and Nuprin to the stores by a few months. Only two years later, it was forced off the market by a cyanide poisoning hoax.

Fit, an anti-bacterial fruit and vegetable cleaning spray[citation needed]

Fluffo, golden yellow shortening sold mid 1950's-early 1960's.

Fresco Bath Soap

Hidden Magic, an aerosol hair spray dubbed "the Titanic of the hair-spray business", sold in mid-1960s

High Point instant decaffeinated coffee

Ivory Flakes, P&G's first soap packaged in boxes, sold from 1910's-early 1970's.

Monchel beauty soap

OK, economy bar & packaged laundry soap.

P and G White Naphtha Soap, a white naphtha bar soap used for washing the laundry and dishes.

P and G White Laundry Soap, a white bar soap made during World War I and World War II temporarily replacing P and G White Naphtha Soap when naphtha was used for the war effort.

Pace & SELF "No-Lotion" Home Permanents[citation needed]

Physique hair care line (shampoos, conditioners, styling aids), phased out c. 2005

Pin-It, pin curl home permanent, sold mid 1950's.

Puritan liquid vegetable oil (The first brand to sell canola oil, later merged into the Crisco oil brand)

Purico

Rely, super-absorbent tampons in production from 1976–1980. It was pulled off the market during the TSS crisis of the early 1980s.

Royale (Canada), a brand of toilet paper, later merged into the Charmin brand

Salvo, the first concentrated tablet laundry detergent, which was discontinued in the 1970s then later a dish detergent (sold in the U.S. 2004-2005; it's still sold in Latin America)

Selox, puffed soap sold in 1920's and 1930's.

Shasta, a cream shampoo sold late 1940's-mid 1950's.

Solo, a liquid laundry detergent with fabric softener that was later merged into the Bold brand.

Star Soap & Star Naphtha Soap Chips.

Stardust dry chlorine bleach (extensively test-marketed during the 1960s)

Sunshine Margarine

Teel, a liquid dentifrice sold late 1930's-late 1940's.

Thrill dishwashing liquid

Torengos, a stackable, triangular-shaped, corn-based snack chip sold 2001-2003

Venus Shortening

Wondra lotion for dry skin. There were many formulas. (The first major brand to use "silicones")[citation needed]

[edit] Coconut-based cleaning and food products

Purico

Star

Perla

Sunshine

Camay

Mayon

PMC

Victor

Ola

Agro

Fresco

[edit] Laundry and personal cleansing products

Tide

DariCreme

Primex

Safeguard

Ariel

Gain

Bonus

Daz

Lava

Mr. Clean

Prell

Crest

Zest

Moncler

Ivory

[edit] Health care

Vicks

Fibresure

Thermacare

Pepto Bismol

[edit] Hair care and laundry categories

Pampers

Whisper

Rejoice

Tide

Max Factor

Vidal Sassoon

Ivory

Pantene

[edit] Dishwashing, fabric care and food categories

Joy

Mr. Clean

Downy

Alldays

Pringles

[edit] Laundry, personal care and hair care

Secret

Safeguard

Ascend

Ariel

Old Spice

Zest

Clairol

Nice n Easy

Wella

Camay

[edit] Pure list

4711

Ace

el

Alomatik

Always

Ammens

Antikal

Ariel

Asacol

Attento

A Touch of Sun

Aussie

Ava

Ayudin

AZ

Balsam Color

Bess

Blend-a-dent

Blend-a-med

Blendax

Bold

Bonus

Bonux

Boss - Hugo Boss

Bounce

Bounty

Braun

Buffette

Camay

Cascade

Charmin

Cheer

Cheff

Cierto

Clairol

Comet Cleanser

CoverGirl

Crest

Cutie

Daily Defense

Dash

Dawn

Daz

Didronel

Dodot

Downy

Dreft

Dryel

Dunhill

Duracell

Essex

Ela

Era

Escudo

Eukanuba

Evax

Fairy

Febreze

Fixodent

Folgers

Flash

Forte

Frost & Tip

Gain

Gillette

Gleem

Head & Shoulders

Herbal Essences

Hipoglos

Hydrience

Iams

Infasil

Infusium 23

Inner Science

Ivory Dish

Ivory Soap

Ivory Snow

Joy

Koleston

Kukident

Ladysan

Laura Biagiotti

Lavasan

Lenor

Linedor

Loreto

Loving Care

Luvs

Macrobid / Macrodantin

Magia Blanca

Magistral

Max Factor

MaxMara

Men's Choice

Metamucil

Millstone

Mirage

Miss Clairol

Motif

Mr. Clean / Mr. Propre / Mr. Proper / Maestro Limpio / Meister Proper / Masto Lindo / M. Net / Don Limpio

Mum

Muse (beauty care product)

Myth

Natural Instincts

Naturella

New Wave

Nice n Easy

Noxzema

NyQuil/DayQuil

Ña Pancha

Olay/Olaz

Old Spice

Pampers

Pantene

Pepto-Bismol

Perla

Physique

Pop

Prilosec OTC

Pringles

Puffs

PŪR

Rejoice

Rindex

Rol

Roli

Safeguard

Salvo

Scope

Secret

Senior

Shamtu

Shockwaves

Silvikrin (Hairspray)

SK-II

Supremo

Sure

Swiffer

Tampax

Tempo

Tess

Tide

Tip

Tras

Thermacare

Ultress

Unijab

Valet

Valentino

Vencedor

Venus

Viakal

Vicks

Vidal Sassoon

Vitapyrena

Vizir

Wash & Go

Wella

Wellaflex

Whisper

Wick

Wash

XtremeFX

Yes

Zest

Katherine - posted on 11/17/2010

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What sucks is there are the big companies like Proctor and Gamble that make 50+ different products. They do animal testing big time. They also have an organic line, and many other lines. They are a HUGE monopoly you would have to avoid almost everything. Ahhh, now I have to go and Google it.

Kylie - posted on 11/17/2010

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I think testing beauty products on animals should be banned. I've boycotted L'oreal because they continue to torture rabbits. This is a little exert from a petition to boycott them.
L'Oreal continues to use thousands of animals to test upon every year. L'Oreal does not want to reveal animal testing to their customers, and they certainly don't want to reveal the disgusting range of tests carried out on the animals. In the name of vanity, animals are subjected to painful and cruel ingredient testing by the industry. Disgraceful eye irritation tests are conducted by securing rabbits so they are immobile while substances are dropped into their eyes (rabbits are used because they have no tear ducts and therefore cannot relieve the stinging and pain). Poisoning takes place whereby groups of animals are continually force-fed an ingredient until half of the group die. Other animals have their skin shaved and scraped until super-sensitive, then the ingredient is applied to test skin reaction - making sure that the poor animal cannot scratch or remove the substance. It is hard to imagine the pain suffered by these defenceless animals. But we all know how sore it can be when we get something in our eye or our skin is scraped - at least we can immediately do something to relieve the pain. Think of what it would be like if we were unable to touch or stop the pain, not just for a minute or two but for hours running into days. It's simply so disgraceful! And, we have only briefly mentioned three tests - there are a further six animal tests used by the cosmetics industry.

There are plenty of companies that do not test on animals and I choose to support them.

Charlie - posted on 11/17/2010

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Jennifer lots of people are paid good money to be tested on , Quiet a few backpackers pay theri way around the world like this , i know a couple of people personally who have done it and they say there is more people than they need to test on .

[deleted account]

I don't mean to be blunt but what humans are going to volunteer to have chemicals tested on them? That doesn't make testing on animals right or fair but how else would they test them?

[deleted account]

It's not that 99% of the products are tested on animals. It's the chemicals contained within those products which have been tested.

A lot of companies who take the not tested on animals approach are still using chemicals that have been passed as safe in the past as a result of animal testing. They aren't using these practices for testing their products. Should they ignore all research done in the past which has found certain chemicals to be safe or dangerous?

Rosie - posted on 11/17/2010

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i do think sometimes it's unnecessary to test on animals. why put foundation on an animal, lol? i don't know, i think it is very necessary in most cases, i would just like to see it used less when it doesn't need to be used.

[deleted account]

Hmm I'm not sure where i stand on this, I tend to see both sides. I may see where this thread goes and see if it swings me one way or the other.

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