Breastfeeding breaks should be paid?

Jodi - posted on 05/25/2011 ( 88 moms have responded )

25,928

36

3891

NEW mums want paid breastfeeding breaks in the workplace.

The Australian Breastfeeding Association yesterday welcomed new federal laws making it illegal to discriminate against breastfeeding mothers.

But it said the laws should go further by including paid lactation breaks across all workplaces.

Some Victorian workplaces already have breastfeeding breaks for new mothers, but ABA president Querida David said they should be legislated across all industry sectors.

Staff could use lactation breaks - two a day up to 30 minutes each - to express milk, and store it, or leave the premises to feed their babies.

The news comes just days after a study showed stay-at-home mothers are shrinking in numbers.

Victorian Employers' Chamber of Commerce and Industry workplace relations policy manager Alexandra Marriott said employers and staff should be encouraged to work out a mutually acceptable policy.

"Lactation breaks are generally something contemplated by enterprise agreements or by workplace policy and procedure," she said.

The new federal laws strengthen existing Victorian equal opportunity legislation, which protect breastfeeding in the workplace and public life.

But Ms David said more action was needed in assisting workplaces in implementing practices that supported breastfeeding.

Kew mother-of-two Karen Richards said feeding a baby was the most natural thing in the world and she was amazed laws had to be passed to protect women doing this.

"A baby doesn't wait for the most appropriate moment. When a baby is hungry, it's hungry - and you'd think most people would understand that."

Ms Richards, who breastfeeds her six-month-old son Louis, said she had not suffered discrimination.

But she was shocked when friends were asked not to breastfeed at a cafe.

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/nationa...

So do you think mothers should expect to be PAID for their breastfeeding breaks? Should it be legislated, or should it just be an arrangement between employer and employee? Do you think that this type of legislation could ultimately discourage employers from hiring women of childbearing age?

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Jodi - posted on 05/26/2011

25,928

36

3891

1. You didn't have to tell them, all you needed to know were the hours. They don't need to know anything you don't wish to tell them with respect to your private life, as long as it is not going to affect your work. And breastfeeding does not need to affect your job.

2. You don't HAVE to breastfeed the feeds she will miss - you just need to pump. If you can't pump at work, you pump extra during the day and give her a bottle while you are at work.

3. If they TOLD you they couldn't hire you because you breastfeed a baby, then report it, because it is absolutely illegal.

4. If they didn't tell you they couldn't hire you because you breastfed a baby, then there IS the possibility that a lot of other people applied and you were just not the best person for the job and it had nothing to do with your breastfeeding.

Sharon - posted on 05/26/2011

11,585

12

1314

Its MY job, which is MY choice to pay for my home and expenses.

Its obvious the mother doesn't really want a job so much as a free hand out. As usual.

I get employees coming all day long "I need friday off." The schedule is made is 2 weeks in advance, no you can't have it off."

"I need an extra break." "I have a doctors appointment today, is it ok if I leave and come back and make up the time?" No, leave and don't come back till your next scheduled day on, I'll call someone to come in and cover for you. I'm sure they need their pay.

I'm not talking about appointments like the one last week where a girl was injured. She had a follow up appointment that had to happen that day. Thats fine.

I have a two new mothers at work too. Both gave birth within weeks of each other. Both are breastfeeding. One of them just lays in a supply at home. The other keeps asking me for a break. "uh we've 50 people in line on a saturday and 3 cashiers and you need a fucking break NOW?" and her ass isn't gone for 5 minutes. She's gone for 20. I've angry fucking customers calling us all every name in the book. so guess who isn't on the schedule very much next week? I am NOT picking up the slack of some bitch who didn't think ahead. Our job isn't one where you can just walk away at any given moment and everything is just like you left it. Its a service industry. Without those customers, we don't make our sales, we don't make our sales, we don't get our bonuses. and they can all fucked if they think I'm busting MY ass so they can indulge in their personal wants.

Krista - posted on 05/26/2011

12,562

16

842

Personally, I would just like to see employers allow for more flexible work schedules for ALL employees.

So let's say a mom needs an extra half-hour a day to nurse? Fine. She's allowed to come in 15 minutes early and leave 15 minutes later, and that gains her an extra half-hour break. Or let's say that a parent needs to leave early to go to his kid's basketball game. Fine. He can come in an hour early and work through lunch.

Whenever it is feasible, I think that flex time should be available for people. Where I work, in the summertime, a lot of people will work an extra hour a day Monday through Thursday, and leave at noon on Fridays. They're still working the same number of hours, so no productivity is lost.

Obviously, this only works in a business-to-business setting. But even in a service or retail setting, I think it would definitely increase employee satisfaction and employee loyalty if they could have some control over their hours.

Carolyn - posted on 05/27/2011

898

19

140

in my opinion leaves dont even compare. in most places when an employee is on leave, a part time person gets more hours, someone gets temporarily promote to the person on leaves position, a temp is hired, etc. Taking a few weeks or months off is alot more easily managed in most places because it creates an actuall vacancy for a new person to step in and assume a role in its entirety for a period of time. You just cant do that with nursing/pumping breaks.



I think its great that more fathers are taking advantage of parental leave options out there. My husband wanted to , but i told him when he could carry a baby and give birth then nurse than he can have the leave lmao, otherwise its all mine ;)



implementing a cut off leads to questions like : who is the legistlation / company / employer to determine how long I can nurse my child? who are they to remove that choice from me? Why 6 months when the W.H.O recommends breastfeeding for 2 years or more until the child self weans at 3-4 years old ? A cut off will open up a whole host of issues.



i still say equal pay for equal work and equal expectations and benefits. Pumping is not work as it relates to your job that you are paid to do by your employer.



Im all for equality and womens rights in the workplace, but i do beleive it needs to be truly equal and not just when convenient, and we should not expect any rights that are not afforded to every coworker regardless of age, gender, or childbearing and nursing ability.

Jessica - posted on 05/26/2011

165

26

15

Like Michele said, people get breaks during their 8 hour day, paid usually, so get it done then. If they are suggesting breastfeeding women should get extra breaks in order to express, well thats discrimination to those who dont breastfeed, in all reality. Because Joe is a man and cant breastfeed(obviously lol) he is not entitled to these extra paid breaks? 'Susan' who can't have children unfortunately, isn't allowed that hour paid because she has no babies? Most people stay home for the first year with the baby so this shouldn't be an issue for the most part. I understand some women dont have that option to take the year off, and thats fine, but if you still choose to breastfeed even though you're back at work, well do so on your already determined breaks. At best, the employer should allow maybe 5-10 mins more on the breaks. You aren't working or even doing anything work related while breastfeeding so child-bearing women should not be allowed 'extra' breaks to do this. Its as rediculous as having an employee who has to pray every hour and giving them 30 mins every time to go and pray. It has nothing to do with work, so why make the taxpayers pay for you to sit somewhere and pump milk out of your boob? These women should plan their time a little better so as not to interfere with work. You have a job in a workplace, so do it. And don't whine and make up excuses if you choose to have children. Life doesn't stop because of it, and employers shouldn't be forced to bend to the every need of a new mom.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

88 Comments

View replies by

[deleted account]

Not for nothing, but a pumping mother's body will adjust to a new routine in a few days. Yes, you will be uncomfortable, engorged, leak-if you actually are that kind of heavy milk producer. (certianly not every nursing mom is) But a women's body will adjust and can withstand several hours until you do get a short break to pump.

Emma - posted on 05/28/2011

89

11

5

I second Jodi. I completely agree with all you just said.
In England we do have more maternity rights...we get 9 months paid and 3 months unpaid...1 year in total. However, some women cannot afford to stay off on maternity pay. I would find it difficult going back to work and pumping because I only get one 20min break a day...no lunch break...because I only work 6 hr days. That would not be enough time to pump, eat lunch and rest! However, I do not feel I should get extra breaks. If my work were willing to give me 30mins break and I started or finished 10 mins ealier/later I would be willing to do this, if not I would get myself into a new feeding routine before returning to work so as not to cause any problems. New legislation would cause further discrimination for women in the workplace. Who will employ someone who wants extra paid breaks? They can make excuses like 'you were not as experienced as other applicants' to get through the discrimination accusations! It is not fair on other employees if certain ppl are getting more paid breaks to them, and in ll honesty I think I would feel guilty if I got extra breaks because I would be thinking of the teachers who are doing my work for me while im pumping.

Jodi - posted on 05/27/2011

25,928

36

3891

To me, what it comes down to is, all workers should be treated equally. I thibnk a breastfeeding mother should be able to negotiate breaks as needed, if it is possible in that particular work environment, BUT I don't think they should be paid breaks unless everyone gets the same paid breaks. And I agree with Alyssa, that any legislation favouring breastfeeding women in the workplace like this may result in further discrimination, particularly if a very small business is involved.

[deleted account]

Marina: Some people may abuse smoke breaks, some women will abuse pumping breaks. There'll always be a few, I guess that can't be avoided.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 05/27/2011

18,870

9

2998

Daniela, I can agree with you on most of your points, except the smoking one. I smoked at my job, and I would NOT be gone longer than 3-5 minutes. I am a vet tech, and in a spare moment , the doctors did not mind me going out for a smoke. I could NOT be gone for long, because of how much I was needed by the Doctors, and I also had my own patients to see every 30mins. Some people may abuse smoke breaks, but NOT everyone!

[deleted account]

I used to pump during my normal break, in a private room. I do think women have to be protected by law. You can't have a recommendation for nursing for at least one year in place and then not enable women to do just that. That said, I don't see why there can't be flexibility on both sides. In the early months you might need to pump more often, some women might have to pump a little longer than others. It shouldn't be such a big deal. I used to smoke and also worked with plenty of smokers. A break is never just 5 minutes plus there always seem to be at least 2 people missing, for company. Other people are overly chatty and seem to be doing nothing but talk all day. Others are on the internet all day (I'd say a good few of those are on CoM...). I could give a long, long list of things that people at work spend their time with that has actually nothing to do with work. But a nursing mom needs a bit of extra time and all of a sudden everyone is up in arms over it. I know things will work differently in different workplaces, but I'm sure a bit of good will can go a long way. And where that is missing - you have a law to help it along.

Becky - posted on 05/27/2011

2,892

44

92

Well, I guess it depends on the workplace. In my old job, no one would have had to cover for me while I went to pump. If an emergency came up on my caseload and someone needed to get ahold of me immediately, they might have had to come find me, but no one would have had to do my paperwork or answer my phone or meet with my clients. So, in a situation like that, I don't really see an issue with a woman taking extra breaks to pump, as long as she is still completing her work and fulfilling all her responsibilities. I mean, let's face it, when you have a desk job, a lot of people don't spend the entire 8 hours behind their desk doing exclusively work-related things anyways! They answer personal emails, they make phone calls to their spouses, they check facebook, they order things on Amazon, they chat with coworkers...
Now, if you are in a job like teacher, nurse, service industry, then I can see where it causes problems if you are taking extra breaks that not everyone is getting and making someone else have to cover for you. So no, in those cases, I think a person should use the breaks they are given, not be asking for extras.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 05/27/2011

18,870

9

2998

Dana S, I hope you do not think I was saying every state is the same. I have worked in 2 different states, my sister has worked in 3 and so has my mother. All the states were Massachusetts, Missouri, Minnesota, Florida, and Texas. None of the employers gave paid breaks. Every state differes, and each company also. But, saying that, America is not known for paying for breaks or maternity leave.

Vera - posted on 05/27/2011

110

9

11

Carolyn I completely understand your point which is why there is so much controversy for women in the work place - every job is different as far as safety issues etc and I do completely understand your point about a man having to take on extra responsibility because "some lady" decided to get pregnant and nurse.

It's so hard to debate an issue like this because what is right for one person may not be right for the next - it may affect a person in a way they wouldn't like at the workplace while benefiting the other. We make those choices as parents, friends, spouses etc everyday a choice for the greater good. Nursing doesn't last forever, and a company could put a cut off at say 4 months total (given the mom is off for 2 months initially) that would give her 6 total months for devotion to the child where nursing/pumping is concerned.

Heck it is becoming more common now for men to take a leave for the birth of the child - my husbands work paid for his – and none of his coworkers complained – they are all men.

I do understand how it would feel having to be in a situation like that ... it just makes it hard to make a decision as to what would be right or wrong ... on the fence with this one.

Carolyn - posted on 05/27/2011

898

19

140

Vera, alot of those scenarios you discuss, such as funerals, doc appts. holidays, sick days. Those are options available to all employees , and every employee works within the employers guidelines for those things. A doctors appointment, funerals, playing hookie... doesnt occur everyday , several times a day for several months if not years depending on how long the mother nurses. So if i am a young man and noone dies, i am healthy and cant breastfeed my baby i should have less breaks, have to work more and harder than the lady at the desk beside me ? eep, wouldnt sit well with me..

If an employee calls in sick, you call another employee in to cover their shift or the work is waiting for the employee when the are well ( depending on where/type of work).

It is reasonable for an employer to call an employee to cover a day or part of days work , but you cant have someone come in to cover pumping breaks etc. know what i mean ?

In my work, if my partner was given additional paid breaks, creating a safety issue so she could go pump, i would be requesting a new shift partner and speaking to the union, having nothing to do with what she is doing with that time, but the safety and unfair labour division it creates between 2 employees of the same classification and job description. then again we get 2 15 minute breaks paid and 1 hour lunch unpaid on dayshift, and all "breaks" paid on nightshifts so she would have adequate time to pump, it just puts my life at risk is all, but hey .... we gotta make sure she can pump amirite ?

Vera - posted on 05/27/2011

110

9

11

Carolyn I do agree that it shouldn't impact employees etc (hadn't really thought about that part) but still for a few months could the employees etc not compromise and try to help. No it isn’t their job but that moms schedule etc may already be helping someone that is in school, sick has a Dr. apt, vacation, etc etc etc... why cant they for a few months help a mom out.

I just don't see with some of the companies being so mean to not help them out because of a choice. It's a choice to go to school, go to a funeral (not being cold hearted either just saying) it's a choice to see a Dr. if you get sick so you don't miss work or get others sick, to play hookie from work, choice to go to the dentist etc... take vacation... everyone makes choices this is a life choice for your child. Those choices also impact your work and the employees that work with you, they rearrange schedules for those employees why should this be any different for just a few months? School is years, classes change…

But now that you say that Carolyn and going back to her orig question I think that if they do pass laws it will make things harder on moms or pregnant moms or moms to be getting or keeping a job.

Dana - posted on 05/27/2011

11,264

35

489

I'm sorry but, the whole US is not the same. That's like saying all of Canada is the same, all of Australia, England, etc... is the same.

Each state is different. Each company is different. In Ohio we legally get many breaks throughout the day. There are also plenty of companies who will go above and beyond the laws to accommodate their employees. We all know production is better if your employees are happy.

Carolyn - posted on 05/27/2011

898

19

140

All employes should have the same breaks and benefits as their co workers, regardless of age, sex, breastfeeding .. etc.

Yes as a breastfeeding mothers we face a whole different set of challenges and stress around returning to work. Some choose to wean, some choose to suppliment, some choose to pump. A persons choices should not impact the rest of their coworkers and add stress to their work day (having to cover for you, pick up slack, take on additional responsibilities) etc. etc.

In my circumstances, i work 12 hours with a partner. We are the only people in the building on our shift who do what we do. I cannot just leave her in the middle of the night to go breastfeed or pump, it would be unsafe as at that point we are the only 2 staff in the building. It would be unfair for me to expect more paid breaks than her as well, while leaving her to deal with everything that comes up and putting her at risk safety wise. Should my coworker have to work longer, harder and be at risk because I need to pump ? No.

There are just to many variables, and differences in work places, positions and job responsibilities to make a blanket policy that will probably only hurt women in the workplace in the long run.

I had my job before i got pregnant, and before i chose to breastfeed and new what i would be dealing with going back to work if i chose to continue to breastfeed upon my return. I think its up to the mom to work with what she has available to her to make it work and get creative about her options and how to make the most of them.

I know plenty of moms who are nursing and gone back to work and are being succesful without extra paid breaks, special treatment/accomodations from employers to think that something like this is needed

(atleast here in Canada where there is 1 year leave available etc)

Vera - posted on 05/27/2011

110

9

11

Dana - no they don't make it easy at all. Plus people here are really negative towards nursing moms so that doesn't help.

I remember working for one company (huge across the entire us) I had worked in 3 site locations and in 2 different states. In one state they have “smoking rooms” with vents for those smokers… no nursing rooms. In another location they had a smoke room they turned into a storage room for papers (because smoking is illegal indoors in that state.)

There was a girl pumping – they made her pump in the restroom on the toilet. No one would allow her to use the offices or maybe the storage room area, lock the break room for privacy, nope… the nasty restroom! I feel bad because she was trying to hard to do the best for her child… yep it’s ok to help smokers – give em their own room but not nursing moms… just don’t get the logic.

[deleted account]

I feel bad for women in the US who want to breastfeed. They definitely don't make it easy, do they? Gah.

Vera - posted on 05/27/2011

110

9

11

The health department (or what ever) in almost every country is encouraging moms to bf these days because it is better for babies- so that would require them to pump at work - one would think that any work place or company would recognize that and try to compromise with the mom.

They don't realize how stressful it is for her to be in that situation - if they don't wanna pay schedule her for a hour more to make up for the time so she doesn't lose pay, if she is ok with it. Some moms might be ok losing a hour of pay (because if their milk supply runs down that formula is super expensive!)

As for the breaks many companies do not give you your 15 break when you need it - I know I worked one place where it was very common I would start work at 8 my 15 min break was at 8:10 lunch was at 3:30pm and my second break was at 4:35. Those break times would have NEVER fit into a pumping schedule! I believe you are supposed to pump like every 2-3 hours or so to keep up your milk supply – or as the baby is feeding to keep on schedule.

But as side note and a personal note I think it should be paid in every country – moms are doing something beneficial for work and their children and I don’t think they get enough credit for trying so hard to do the best they can. The health department says getting a flu shot is beneficial and SO many companies have a yearly thing that you go to and a physical, flu shot & something else that the company pays for out of their pocket (not your insurance) just to make sure employees are healthy – they could also do something to help mom and child too! There are things for companies to help stop smoking – they send free patches to help stop smoking or meds for it - … list goes on – they are worried about employees health … could help nursing moms too!

Mel - posted on 05/27/2011

5,539

58

226

God its been almost 3 years since Ive woked but from memory we were entitled too one half hour break for every 8 hours, or 5 minute break for a 6 hour shift (I personally hated the 6 hour shifts on checkouts busy day and get to sit down for 5 minutes before returning, especially while pregnant this was full on for me). We were allowd to take an hours lunch break but if we choose to do that I think from memory it wasnt paid and with my shifts for example I had a choice, take an hour and work il later or take half hour and finish earlier. I took an hour lunch break every day so my shift was 9.30am-6.30pm generally or sometimes had to start earlier at 9 is they were short staffed, then saturdays I did 8.30-2.30 and got a 5 minute break (maybe 10 cant recall)

Emma - posted on 05/27/2011

89

11

5

Following on from what Marina is saying...I live in England and our laws say you get one 20min break for every 6hrs you work. Therefore someone like me who is a teacher and only gets one 20min break would be stuck. Also, my 20 min break is spent in the staff room as there are no private rooms for women to express. I have not returned to work yet and I do no feel women should get extra breaks for bf, however, I wish they provided a private area for expressing/feeding so I at least had that option. But hay ho...thats life and if I want to return to work I won't complain about it I will just adjust my feeding pattern to fit in with this before I return to work, but that is my personal choice.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 05/27/2011

18,870

9

2998

Bonnie, if you work 8 hours or more, certain states require different things. My husband is only required to get 1 half hour break for the 8 hours he is there. Some employers offer more. The job I used to have, I was there from 10am-7pm. I got 1 hour. Some places would prefer you to break it up just like you said, 30min and 2 fifteens. It all depends on the employer, and your state break requirements. Like, if you work 6 hours, in some states it is required that you get a 15 min break.

Bonnie - posted on 05/27/2011

4,813

22

257

There are some jobs where I am where you only get a 30 minute lunch unpaid, but there are also others where you get the 30 minute unpaid lunch and two 15 minute paid breaks as well.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 05/27/2011

18,870

9

2998

@ Jessica Kozel "Like Michele said, people get breaks during their 8 hour day, paid usually, so get it done then."

Maybe in whatever country YOU live in, but that is not the case here in the states. I have NEVER had a job that I got paid for my breaks...EVER! And neither has my husband. Consider yourself lucky where you are from...and we only get 6-8 weeks of maternity leave UNPAID!

~♥Little Miss - posted on 05/27/2011

18,870

9

2998

Also, I think what you are doing to that girl, cutting her hours etc, is a clear cut case of discrimination. Watch what you are doing to her.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 05/27/2011

18,870

9

2998

Sharon, it was me who asked about your state. Some states are required by law to allow for time to pump at work.

The Laws

There is no federal law protecting a mother's right to pump in her workplace. There are state laws in place, however these laws vary greatly from state to state and are arbitrarily enforced. There are 12 states that have statutes that maintain a woman's right to pump in the workplace: Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, Tennessee, Illinois, Minnesota, Mississippi, New Mexico, Oregon, Montana, California and Hawaii. Georgia and Oklahoma have laws saying that an employer "may" allow pumping at work, which does not bind them to anything at all. Some states have laws that allow an employer to refuse a woman's right to pump in certain areas, and there are no laws at all that allow extra breaks or meal times to allow for pumping. And there are only three states--California, Oregon and Hawaii--that have actual penalties for employers that don't comply with breast-feeding laws.


Read more: What Is the Labor Law for Pumping Breast Milk at Work? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_6515417_labor-...

Mel - posted on 05/27/2011

5,539

58

226

I had medela one too lucky we did get that one just before we left otherwise I would have ony had my hand pump was was an avent one, just sometimes I coudlnt get much from it, other times it worked better then the electric

~♥Little Miss - posted on 05/27/2011

18,870

9

2998

I had a medela pump, and from set up, pump finish, cleanup etc it took me about 15-25 minutes to pump.

Mel - posted on 05/27/2011

5,539

58

226

Yeah well unfortunately it does for me, pumps are very different to actually breast feeding and Ive used a fair few different ones. I think some people are not mean to get much. It ruined my holiday

Dana - posted on 05/27/2011

11,264

35

489

I'm sure that's the case Bonnie but, I just don't see it taking an hour to pump as the norm either.

And my son also breastfeed for 45 minutes each time, sometimes an hour.

Bonnie - posted on 05/27/2011

4,813

22

257

Dana, I agree that sometimes it is the pump that is not pumping fast enough so you need a really good one, but at the same time, for some women, their flow is just naturally less. No matter what pump they use.

Mel - posted on 05/27/2011

5,539

58

226

I tried :( Got an electric one and a hand one to use both at same time, as not to waste time lol. When I was actually able to use both without getting sore hands

Dana - posted on 05/27/2011

11,264

35

489

Sounds like you needed a better pump!



And I'm sure there are cases where women take longer to get enough milk but, I think they would be few and far between. And there are most likely other complications going on.



If it's taking you and hour to pump, of course you can't take a hour break at work. I don't think anyone would agree with a law that gives you several hours a day to pump.



I have also previously stated that I think pumping can be worked into your regular 10 -15 minute breaks that EVERYONE gets.

Mel - posted on 05/27/2011

5,539

58

226

@ Dana pumping took me at least an hour (this is based on a baby who was 7 months though) I spent my whole honeymoon expressing 3 or 4 times a day but it would be AT LEAST an hour to get anywhere between 40-120 mills (I think 120 mills is 4oz?).

Dana - posted on 05/27/2011

11,264

35

489

This is what you said.

Sharon Grey - posted 10 hours ago

Your child NEEDS to be fed. You WANT to breastfeed. There are other options.

So, yes, you are saying they can FF.

Sharon - posted on 05/27/2011

11,585

12

1314

I didn't say a woman had to formula feed.

We do have a place where a woman can pump or nurse in privacy and basic comfort. If she wants to use the general breakroom, she can but she's not that comfortable with pumping in front of her coworkers, although she is comfortable nursing her baby in front of people.

The first associate seems to be coping quite fine with pumping on her breaks and of course we help out with unexpected letdowns. She gets 1 break per 4 hours and 2 breaks and a lunch per 5 - 7 hours.

She comes in a few minutes early to pump, uses her scheduled break, which can be adjusted if she needs it to be. In other words - she isn't interfering with the rest of us getting our jobs done. Not excessively.

The other one .... is a whole different story. She's fully admitted she's always been daddys' princess. and her attitude shows it. The second we say "its not a good time." she throws a hissy fit. Crying, snot running down her face and more of a bad attitude. ugh - I have to go work and I can't remember if she's on the schedule today. I hope she isn't. Its friday and we're going to be busy.

Dana - posted on 05/27/2011

11,264

35

489

That's breastfeeding. Pumping took me 10 minutes.



The point is not to actually feed your child but, to be able to pump milk to keep your supply going and stocked for who ever IS watching and feeding your child at home or daycare.

Bonnie - posted on 05/27/2011

4,813

22

257

To add to my comments from yesterday, when I breastfed, the average feeding took approximately 45 minutes if not more. So those who are saying women should be accommodated for it, do you really think an employer is going to say, "Okay take 3 extra breaks during your shift!?" That could be 2-3 hours off the work day. I don't see it happening.

Alyssa - posted on 05/27/2011

231

0

18

Rebecca, I actually think that too much legislation FOR women has a negative impact and will make it harder for women to be equals in the workforce.

We all know it is illegal to discriminate...but only if it can be proven. An employer can easily choose to employ a man over a woman to avoid maternity leave and family leave.

Dana - posted on 05/27/2011

11,264

35

489

Well, if you expect women to have to FF to go back to work, I'll gladly tell you you're holding back women's rights. :)

Mrs. - posted on 05/27/2011

1,767

6

30

Actually, I agree with Sharon...but I guess that's not a surprise on this one.

I hope I get told that I'm holding back women's rights again.

Emma - posted on 05/27/2011

89

11

5

I don't think bf mums should get extra breaks but I do think they should be given somewhere to express during the breaks they already get. Some work places have just one staff room where a bf mum may not feel comfortable expressing in front of others, therefore a private area (even just someones office or something) where mums can discretly express would be sufficient I think. As Michele said, would 30mins be enough time to drive to your child, feed them and drive back (if you even drive!) And as Alyssa suggested, 30mins may not be enough time for the baby to feed if at work with you anyway, so an arrangement during the two parties would be the best thing...maybe having longer breaks but taking the time out of the luch break or something like that...it depends on the individual baby and how long they need to feed for!

Jodi - posted on 05/27/2011

25,928

36

3891

"I don't understand why so many women say "oh I had to give up breastfeeding when I went back to work"."

Actually, it doesn't necessarily work like that. I tried to continue breastfeeding when I went back to work with my son (at 6 weeks), and (1) I had nowhere to pump and (2) once I cut back to only breastfeeding at home, I dried up after about 2 weeks. I was told this was probably due to stress. The body needs a lot of rest if you want to produce enough milk. I had struggled with milk production with him as it was. Once it became less regular, it totally disappeared.

Now that doesn't mean I think women should have extra breastfeeding breaks, not at all. Just wanted to clear that one up so you can understand why women say that. Because sometimes, it's true.

Amber - posted on 05/26/2011

1,909

13

144

If I was hunting them down, I'd be writing them up (if I could). I guess I just don't see the majority of people as bad. Some people are assholes, she obviously is, but I like to think people are mostly good....until they prove me wrong. Then I torture them :) hehe

Sharon - posted on 05/26/2011

11,585

12

1314

She does not have the right to make everyone elses' life a pain in the ass for her personal wants.

Pft. I'm thinking of her and the smokers who all insist on their paid breaks. Not one of them takes a 5 minute break. I have to leave my position to hunt each one down where they are hiding and drag them back to work.

I never said she couldn't pump or breastfeed on her expected breaks. Just that we shouldn't fund extra breaks to suit her or anyone else.

Frankly. In all my years managing, I find that people demand these perks are the ones who intend to abuse them.

I'm looking at this from a professional point of view. Yeah and a personal one, because of the amount of stress she's created. Everyone hates her. Honestly - I wouldn't trust the milk she leaves in the fridge.

Cynthia - posted on 05/26/2011

900

34

74

i do not think mothers should be paid for their breastfeeding breaks. I don't think anyone should be paid to do anything that is not part of the job they were hired to do.

Amber - posted on 05/26/2011

1,909

13

144

It's also HER job. And she has a right to pay her bills and feed her child. You aren't the only employee.

So, because one woman is an irresponsible twit no woman should be able to feed her child the best food that she can?

I was a cashier for 3 years. We had to wait for our break if the lines were backed up. That was a standard business practice. Nobody ever said that women should take their breaks during a peak time. Nobody should unless it's an emergency, IMO.

You're looking at this from a personal perspective because you know somebody who is abusing the system. If she acted responsibly and didn't make your life difficult, then I doubt you'd be this ticked off about it.

Amber - posted on 05/26/2011

1,909

13

144

Sharon, you would also have a choice too. If you don't want to cover for her while she pumps milk for her child to eat, then you don't have to work there. It's her baby, her life, and your feelings and extra shit aren't her problem.

See? Options all around :)

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms