Breech birth

Merry - posted on 08/19/2011 ( 346 moms have responded )

9,274

169

248

Is it safer to do a csection for breech or is it safer to do a vaginal birth for breech.
Drs in my area say surgery is safer, but I really wonder if this is just because they get paid more for a surgery.
Now if you mess with a breech vaginal birth I know it's dangerous but I've seen many successful breech births where they let moms body do it's thing and not try to help much.....

So i know the general consensus I'd that c section is safest for breech, but is it possible that vaginal breech can be just as safe?

MOST HELPFUL POSTS

Mary - posted on 08/20/2011

3,348

31

119

When I first started working in OB, we still did vaginal breeches in my hospital (mid 90's). I would say, at that time, all of the practitioners, docs and midwives alike, were relatively experienced with them. While they were always more nerve-wracking, it never seemed like too big of a deal...until, within the space of one year, we had 3 babies die of head entrapment. The last one was, by far, the worst, as she was the receptionist for the OB who delivered her. She was known to most of the staff, and adored by this particular OB. It was absolutely soul crushing for the entire hospital (not to mention the woman and her family). Unless it was a case of twins, with baby A being vertex, we pretty much stopped doing them. This impacted not just the doc in question, but ALL of our practitioners. It just didn't seem worth the risk.



To whomever said that the worst that can happen is that they break the mother's pelvis to get the kid out - you are woefully wrong. The worst that can happen is that the head won't come out, your baby dies, and they have to shove the body back up and do a section to get it out. Sorry, but there is no way in hell that my "birth experience" is worth risking that. You could quote statistics at me all day long, and after seeing that just once, I never want to be a part of that again. I'd chose to be sliced open on a park bench without anesthesia before I'd attempt that.



It's also why, unless your practitioner is over 50 in the US, chances are that they are not skilled or experienced with a vaginal breech (and yes, that means midwives as well). I know that more than a few of have this unwarranted view that doctors are either lazy, uncaring, or just worried about their own bottom line (money or time)...but on this one, you are way the fuck off base. Any human who has been a part of a head entrapment would be hard pressed to continue to do them, when there is a safer alternative readily available. The reason the docs at my hospital stopped doing them had nothing to do with litigation or money; in the example I mentioned, there was no lawsuit, and that girl went on to have another baby that this same OB delivered (via section, as she did have a bit of PTSD, and would not even consider laboring again, even with a vertex baby). It was about the emotional trauma of watching a baby whose head is stuck die before your eyes. That experience stays with you forever.



I know this, because it has never stopped haunting me.

Jodi - posted on 08/27/2011

25,219

36

3781

Tanya, aren"t these reality TV shows? Do I really need to say more? It's all in the edit, people, it's all in the edit........

Krista - posted on 08/22/2011

12,562

16

842

Personally, I couldn't give a flying fuck at a rolling doughnut about my "birth experience". My birth for my kid was AWFUL. I was induced and had the Pitocin contractions from hell for two straight hours and wasn't dilating, until I finally got an epidural. I'd been hoping for a natural birth, and wound up with everything BUT. But at the end of the day, I didn't give a shit if the baby came out of my vagina, my belly, or my left nostril -- as long as he was okay.

What mattered was that I was going home healthy, with my healthy baby in my arms.

Eyes on the prize, people.

Mary - posted on 08/25/2011

3,348

31

119

Oh, Erin, how I wish this was true. I wish that everyone did separate their feelings about their birth experience from those that they have towards their baby...but a lot of woman don't.

There are so many women who become so consumed with anger, regret, and self-pity over their "experience" that it does impair their ability to effectively bond with their child.

I think that one of the (very few) disadvantages of improved maternal-fetal outcomes over the past century is that, for the most part, we expect to get a healthy baby at the end of a pregnancy. In the modern civilized world, where childbirth rarely results in the death of a mother or baby, we, as a society, have almost come to take it for granted that both the mother and baby will come out alive and physically well.

In this day and age of extensive prenatal testing and ultrasounds, many of us have forgotten that even as recently as the 1970's, a woman went into labor truly fearful of whether or not her baby was even physically normal, and had the ability to live outside of the womb. Woman went into childbirth wondering not just what sex the baby was, but whether or not the baby even had properly formed skull. If she seemed "big", she didn't just worry about pushing the baby out, but if there might be more than one in there.

Today, we get to the end of our pregnancies knowing (if we chose) the sex of our baby. If we had even just the "routine" anatomy screening, we are prepared for (almost) any major anomaly that might be present. It's not unreasonable to expect that, if we go into preterm labor at 30 weeks, they can most likely stop, or at least delay delivery until they get some steroids on board. A delivery at 28 weeks is not the automatic death sentence it was 30 years ago.

Nope...now a fair number of us are more consumed with worrying about which songs are playing on our ipods during transition, making sure everybody and anybody within a 5 mile radius is adhering to our birth plan.

Jenny - posted on 08/24/2011

4,426

16

126

My daughter was breech. I had prepared my entire pregnancy for a drug free delivery. The week before my due date my doctor got suspicious and sent me for an ultrasound, sure enough she had turned to frank breech position. I happen to have born breech vaginally and requested to skip the C section. My doctor explained the risks and declined. As she knows more than me on these things I respected her decision. I had a mini meltdown (I'm sure hormones had nothing to do with that), pulled myself together and got over it. I wanted my baby out safe more than I wanted a special birth experience. We went in a few days later and cut her out. Everything went perfectly well and I had my beautiful girl in my arms.



I have had 2 C sections now as I wanted to have a tubal after my son was born. I was out of the hospital 22 hours after he was born and two days later back in my normal routine. Honestly, after all the tearing from vagina to asshole and other horror stories I've heard I'm beginning to think birth is overrated. I'm more interested in my actual babies than my birth experience.

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

346 Comments

View replies by

Melissa - posted on 10/01/2011

157

12

15

My son was frank breech. The doctor tried offering me a bunch of "wives tales" remedies that were supposed to help my son move into the right position, but they never worked. She told me that if I had my heart set on a vaginal birth, that with the help of a specialist would try to "rotate" him. When she told me the risks of doing so (i.e., suffocation from cord being wrapped around the neck), my decision was made to have a C/S. It wasn't worth it to me, and to be completely honest I was terrified of a vaginal birth anyways.

Also, in some cases it can actually be cheaper than a vaginal birth or just as costly. It all depends if there are any complications and amount of time in labor.

Becky - posted on 09/23/2011

232

23

9

10 yr;s ago my daughter was a frank breech. My Doc. told me that she would assist, but a specialist would handle the delivery because of the complications. She set up n appointment with the specialist for us . . . but my water broke before I got there. We had spoken with my doc briefly on the complications, and problems that could arise from trying to deliver vaginally, but mostly she wanted us to talk to the specialist before we made up our minds on which direction we wanted to go. The consult with the specialist went quickly . . . he came in, did an exam and reviewed the charts. He didn't give us any options. He told us we were going to have a c/s and he'd see us in a couple hours. Honestly, I was relieved. I just wanted someone to tell me what was going to be the safest option for my daughter and I. The c/s went as planned. There were no additional complications other than a slight allergic reaction to the epidural. I wound up with a beautiful, healthy baby girl and I recovered rather quickly. It was not the type of birth I had envisioned, but things all worked out.

Now prego with baby #2, I would have a c/s again without concern if needed. My doc. this time is recommending that I try for vaginal because I have no real risk factors that would lead to the need of a second c/s. However, there will be surgical staff at the ready for me in case things do not work out as planned. She also said if any risk factors arise, she will order the c/s right away to keep me and my baby safe, and I appreciate that!

Merry - posted on 09/22/2011

9,274

169

248

Yes my home birth midwife would have stitched me had I torn unless it was a 3rd degree, that requires me to go to the hospital for a surgeon to fix. But I didn't tear a bit!

Janice - posted on 09/22/2011

1,890

18

63

I must agree about doctors being ones who stitch. I couldn't see because of the drape but I know it was my OB or the intern who stitched me up after my C-section.
As for who delivers that really varies. I happen to go to practice with 4 OBs. They take turns being on call at the hospital, so I know it will be one of them and they will not be woken up just for me.
As for an ECV the main risk is fetal distress and immediate C-sec. which is why they are done as close to 37 weeks as possible. I had one because I figured if it worked great, if it didn't I would have a c-sec, and worst case my daughter would be a 3 weeks early. My OB was very experienced and after about 60 extremely painful seconds, he stopped and said "I'm not stopping because your in pain, she is very stuck and continuing to try could hurt her." I was very upset about planning the c-section but at 37 weeks and being a typical uninformed first timer I didn't question its neccessity.
I am wondering for those who do see midwives -do they stitch you if you tear?

Sherri - posted on 09/22/2011

9,593

15

387

They certainly aren't here Kate. Even when I just brought my son in for stitches on his knee a doctor had to stitch him. The nurse just took vitals, laid out suture kit and gave discharge paperwork. She actually got scolded by the doctor because she told us we were all set when we didn't have our prescription yet and a doctors note releasing my son from gym class.

Serinitee - posted on 09/22/2011

50

2

1

There are Midwives overseas who do entire conferences teaching nurses, doctors and other midwives about the importance of hands off breech births. Read the book Pushed, you'll get some good information.

Sherri - posted on 09/22/2011

9,593

15

387

Kate I am reading what you are saying too. I know two people personally who were at 3cms plus and still in labor for 48hrs and admitted into the hospital and 1 that was over 24hrs and all was normal. Heck I was 3cm's dilated for 2wks before ever even going into actual labor.



@Emma we don't have midwives here for the most part. When you are pregnant you go to an OB who is a doctor. That is what you do. Until Com's I didn't even know that some people didn't.



Also your OB delivers your baby no matter what time it is The doctor you have seen for 9mo's is the doctor that delivers your child. So there could be 5 woman at labor at the same time and each could have a different OB, so they would all be delivered by their own personal OB.

Erin - posted on 09/22/2011

6,569

25

232

Oh as for ECV (which I'm assuming is what Brittany was referring to up there ^^), I don't think it's something I would ever do. It does carry considerable risks, which is why they have an OR on standby in the case a crash c/s is needed. Also, even if a breech can be successfully turned, many will turn back to their preferred position.

Erin - posted on 09/22/2011

6,569

25

232

Kate I see what you're saying. I read it ;) But I have a problem with this 3cm = active labour rule. I walked around for 2 days at 4cm in prodromal labour before things picked up. I could have gone to the hospital and been admitted, but there was no way I was in active labour. Other women feel strong regular ctx from scratch, and are turned away because they're only at a 2. Then there are those women who labour painlessly right to the end, and end up with a surprise UC. Or deliver in the hospital entrance lol.

Sorry, I know that is a little bit OT. But these strict 'rules' being applied to labouring women shit me. Birth is birth. It's not straight out of a textbook or hospital policy manual.

Rant over ;)

Sarah - posted on 09/22/2011

5,465

31

331

I was stitched up by the doctor who performed my C-section.
Surely if you start a job, you should finish it ;)

Stifler's - posted on 09/22/2011

15,141

154

597

Why does a doctor need to be at a vaginal birth unless there is something drastically wrong. And why is there no doctor on duty to deliver and the doctor is getting out of bed at 3am?

Kate CP - posted on 09/21/2011

8,942

36

754

Wow, no one is reading what I'm writing and it's rather frustrating.

There is early labor and then there is active labor. ACTIVE labor is when you're 3 cm or more dilated and they'll admit you to the hospital. If you are in active labor for over 24 hours then something is indeed wrong.

Sherri - posted on 09/21/2011

9,593

15

387

Well I watched my cousin have one and watched the OB stitch her. Just saying different places, different things is all.

Melissa - posted on 09/21/2011

441

41

25

Sherri I've had a cesarean and I know several other women who have had one and I can tell you through experience, NONE of us were stiched up by doctors. And Kate, childbirth is different for everyone, there are women who have been in labor for 48+ hours before actually deliverying their children. Nothing is wrong, their body is just doing what it has to do in it's own time.

Merry - posted on 09/20/2011

9,274

169

248

Well I was 6cm at attmittence at 4:30am on a Monday and by noon I was 8cm with a bulging bag of water and i had been 8 for a while so they burst my waters, I went down to 6 cm now without the water pressure on my cervix, then the contractions became unbearable and by 8 pm i demanded an epidural when they said I was still8cm. epidural by 9pm and by midnight I was at 9cm and 3/4 apparently just a lip wouldn't dilate so they tried me pushing with the ob pushng the cervix back, didn't work, she gave me an hour to dilate to ten or a csection. An hour later I was still the same, she tried pushing it back again and still nothing. One more hour she said because erics heart was doing fine. The wonderful nurse got my numbed butt up on all fours and seriously stood there rubbing my lower back for an hour to help Eric turn his head straight so the cervix would go back. By 3 am I was finally at ten! So I pushed until 430 when he was born.

Long long time to get from 6-10 cm in 24 hours! And the only thing 'wrong' was my lack of mobility I think.

Fierna I was 1cm at 530, water broke naturally at 6, by 8 I was at 5, by 10 I was 10cm and by 10:17 she was out! No meds, no beds. Just hands and knees and kneeling in the tub :)



So yeah I think something was wrong with erics labor! It shouldn't take that long but under the hospitals policies that's just what happened to me.

Sherri - posted on 09/20/2011

9,593

15

387

Actually it is because most cesareans are prescheduled because of complications or a previous cesarean during a previous birth obviously they are scheduled during a typical M-F operating schedule. It isn't usually just because the OB is lazy. Also the nurses DO NOT stitch you here the cutting, delivering and stitching is all done 100% by the doctor.



Some doctors yes they are lazy but that typically is the minority the majority of doctors are great doctors that do it for specific reasons.



Typically Kate if you are having active strong contractions and are a certain number of centimeters dilated you are admitted. I have personally known a few people that have been hospitalized for 2 days before they gave birth and one that was hospitalized for 24 hrs before giving birth. They all ended up delivering vaginally too.

Kate CP - posted on 09/20/2011

8,942

36

754

If active labor is going on for 24 or more hours something is wrong.

I was in labor for 6 days but because it wasn't "active" I was sent home. Hospitals don't have the beds to allow women to passively labor for days on end.

Merry - posted on 09/20/2011

9,274

169

248

My vaginal birth took 24 hours in the hospital in labor....and 12 hours at home before that. I'm sure there's women laboring longer then that at the hospital.

Kate CP - posted on 09/20/2011

8,942

36

754

If a vaginal birth is taking days the mom is usually sent home OR something is seriously wrong.

Melissa - posted on 09/20/2011

441

41

25

Doctors make an average of twice the payout for cesarean births as opposed to vaginal births. That's a nationwide average. Vaginal birth can literally take days, a cesarean takes twenty minutes (for the doctor - nurses prep the patient, nurses stitch the patient). Cesareans are easily scheduled, where as a natural birth could pull a doctor out of bed at 3 in the morning. Studies have shown that more ceseareans happen Mon-Fri than any other time (and the numbers are DRASTICALLY lower for the weekends than they are for the weekdays). I don't recall the exact hours of the cesarean peaks, but it was like right after lunch hour and then more towards the end of the work day, kind of like "ok we've been trying all day and I'd really like to get home so let's just get this baby out already". There are, of course, amazing doctors out there who do genuinely want to help people. But that does not mean that there aren't doctors out there simply looking to make the most money for the least possible effort. It's a business, and people would be very niave to truly believe that no one treats it as such.

[deleted account]

I think your numbers I way off, Brittany, re: the salary breakdown. Plus, a c-section takes less than 20 minutes and the aftercare (from the doctor's perspective) is no different than a vaginal birth. The nurses handle most of the aftercare (and paperwork) for either type of birth. That being said, I don't think doctors perform c-sections for the money. I think they perform c-sections because they are convenient, predictable, and unlikely to result in litigation. Plus, I do think there is a mindset that they are rescuing a baby from a mother's body. Right or wrong, I do think most OB's genuinely believe they are doing the right thing by mom and baby by doing a c-section.

[deleted account]

A stargazer is a baby whose head is tilted up -- like he's standing on the ground looking towards the sky (hence the term). A stargazer is an automatic c-section because of the risk of a severe neck injury on the way out.

Brittany - posted on 09/19/2011

531

9

14

P.S. Just a quick breakdown :

Physicians who do surgery makes about $200,000 a year.
$16,666 a month
$4,166 a week.

They will have close to or over $20,000 in student loans to pay back, taxes, and other life expenses.

Most doctors I know work 85 hours a week, which is about $50.00 an hour. So the guy or girl who is saving your life is making $50.00 an hour.

My mother was a waitress my whole life, until she got sick, and there were plenty of days (especially in the winter) when she made $50.00 or more an hour.

Brittany - posted on 09/19/2011

531

9

14

Doctors do not necessarily get paid more for surgery. They take longer, have more paper work, and involve more aftercare. The pay might be slightly more but, when the hours are figured in ect ect. it can be less.

As far as a breached goes you have several options. The doctor and nurses can try and move the child, all though this can be uncomfortable for the mother and usually does not have much bearing on the child. They can do a vaginal birth but, that is very risky to both mother and child. IMO, I am a Medical Student I am NOT a licensed Physician and this is only an opinion, I would suggest a c-section both for the comfort of Mama and to ensure a safe delivery of the baby.

I had mentioned being able to readjust the baby earlier. This could result in the breaking of one or two bones in the child. This is not as "big" of a deal as it sounds. Babies still have their matrix when they are born. They are able to regrow limbs easily and heal bones WAY FASTER then you or I. This could lead into a discussion on stem-cell research and I sure as heck do not want to talk about that, right now.

Get the best advice from your OB.

JL - posted on 09/19/2011

3,635

48

105

Every woman should empower themselves by informing themselves about their options but I do DISLIKE very much the generalized bashing of the medical community and doctors. I have doctors in my family who are amazing people who care deeply for their patients and spend all their extra time researching every option for their patients. Not all doctors are out to make money and profit off their patients. There are many doctors who went to years of school putting themselves in financial debt so they could get into a profession where they could help others and give back through providing the best medical care possible. You would be amazed at how many doctors donate their time to providing free medical care to those who can't afford it and how many spend their vacations travelling to impoverished areas across the world to help out those who are medically suffering.

Janice - posted on 09/19/2011

1,890

18

63

Sherri, you are right that we do all have different needs and wants. I think this is why Melissa was trying to "teach" you. Like you said where you live there are limited options concerning birth. This is because those with the money are forcing certain ideas on others. You would be pissed as hell if you couldn't use your OB any more because another person decided midwives are better and only high risk should see OBs. Everyone in "free" America should have the right to take information and make their own decision, but so many women don't get a choice often because other people are misinformed.

Sherri - posted on 09/18/2011

9,593

15

387

How Laura is because every person is different therefore we all have different wants, needs, likes & dislikes? We are both very passionate about those needs just that we differ on what we personally prefer.

Merry - posted on 09/18/2011

9,274

169

248

What's a stargazers? I've heard of he others.....
Sherri, even if I disagree with most of the things you want for labor and birth I FAR prefer seeing a well educated and informed mom choose dead opposite me then seeing il informed or uneducated moms choosing stuff willy nilly and having no idea what they want!
I may disagree but I aspire your position as a well informed mom.
My info is the same as yours and yet we came to opposite conclusions! How? I have no idea. But you and me know all the same facts and we still prefer opposite stuff.
For the most part. Some things we agree on :) few :)

[deleted account]

If I had been pregnant with only one baby, my OB would have been OK with a vaginal breech birth because a vaginal delivery would have been safer. With twins, it was less safe. He was a very experienced doctor in his 60s and was very comfortable delivering breech babies. The problem, as mentioned by others, is that very few doctors today have ever trained for or attended a breech delivery. A breech birth with an inexperienced attendant is a recipe for disaster. It also depends on the position of the breech baby (footling, frank, complete, stargazer or not).

Sherri - posted on 09/18/2011

9,593

15

387

I have already thanks. I do not see it through your eyes at all!! I strongly believe OB's are better and so are hospital births. This is my opinion and I will stick to it and I also will always follow the advice of my doctor, OB, nurse etc. over you since they have my best interests in mind. I chose them all carefully. By the way Melissa I am not a new mom, I am pregnant with #4 and I am well aware as too whom I want and what I want from a birth:

That will be an OB, Hospital birth, induction if necessary, most definitely an episiotomy, definitely monitoring, definitely get my water broken, will try without any drugs but if I need them will get them too. Plus he does all my boys circumcisions too.

It has nothing to do with ignorance I will informed but I will NEVER EVER use a midwife they do not have my same beliefs. Not to mention I don't even know if you could even get one here if you wanted too?? I have never even heard of them here. Plus I love love love my OB. I interviewed many and fell in love with him and I have been seeing him now for the past 15yrs and he delivered all of my children. I trust him explicitly.

Melissa - posted on 09/17/2011

441

41

25

Sherri I have to recommend you watch Business of Being Born, as well as Pregnant In America. Both are available for direct streaming on Netflix, if you have access to that. They're very interesting, empowering and EXTREMELY packed with information. The first is more informative as far as facts are concerned, and the second is packed as well, but that one more or less gives you a behind-the-scenes of things that go on in the medical industry today when concerning women and children. You certainly don't have to have the same opinions as me, we're human, we're naturally wired to NOT always agree on everything, but I think it would be really beneficial to you if you realized that facts are not opinions, and the facts, even the scary ones, are very much a reality.

Melissa - posted on 09/17/2011

441

41

25

Sherri these are not opinions, they are facts. If you look up the definition of an OB, they are surgeons. You clearly have not at all researched the facts surrouding childbirth, pregnancy, or the systems put into place in America, let alone the systems put into place in other parts of the world in order to compare. We're all entitiled to go to whomever we're most comfortable with for our pregnancy and childbirth, that's the wonderful thing about options, but realistically you're not utilizing "options" if you haven't at all researched what your options are. Using blind judgement on those options without actually knowing what they are is ignorance, and that is how so many of these doctors are so easily enabled to take advantage of women in America today. I've seen it too many times, and it happened with me when my first was born because I was like so many others and didn't even realize that educating myself on these things was important as it is. It kills me to see so many women victimized and not even realize what's being done to them or their children. Ignorance is bliss, but in this case it's putting mothers and children at an inevitable risk. And that's not opinion. Our nation-wide statistics make that more than clear.



Here is a wonderful story about a homebirth of twins with both babies being breech. Personally, if I were in this situation I would prefer to be in a hospital simply due to the heightened risks, I would have felt more comfortable knowing medical intervention was close by IF it became a necessity. However I would also have utilized a midwife.



http://www.natural-pregnancy-mentor.com/...

Heather - posted on 09/16/2011

15

7

0

haveing had 2 "sunnie side ups", im going with c-sec, that being said, my older brother was a breach and born vaginaly(my mom is one tuff cookie) it would depend on what all els is going on, and acording to my mom,...the size of you hips,....think she was just messing with me on that tho!

Sherri - posted on 09/16/2011

9,593

15

387

That is your opinion Melissa you are entitled to it. You are also entitled to use whom ever you so choose for your pregnancies. I will never not choose an OB I don't like midwives personally nothing about them is something that I would ever want for myself. I simply don't share the same beliefs as yourself and or feelings about OB's, hospitals etc. that you have.

Melissa - posted on 09/16/2011

441

41

25

I'll also point out that 70% of births in Europe are attended by a midwife. OB's are actually surgeons who specialize in childbirth, they are not properly trained in actual BIRTH, they're trained in surgery. An OB is a perfect answer for a complicated or high risk pregnancy. Otherwise, a midwife is literally an EXPERT in pregnancy and childbirth. America for the last roughly 110-115 years has fought to place childbirth in the hospital and wipe out the idea of a midwife, but it's not the answer. As you can clearly see from comparing our countries system to that of other countries who are having healthier and more successful birthing stories.

Melissa - posted on 09/16/2011

441

41

25

Unfortunately decisions in hospitals are now being made for monetary and legal purposes, rather than because the choices are better for mother and child. I think it's EXTREMELY important for any woman who is, or wants to be a mother to thoroughly research the options, their health care providers, the hospitals in which they will deliver, and the system we're put through in general. We have the highest cesarean rates AS WELL as the highest infant/mother mortality rates as far as the developed and industrializes countries are concerned. If you go to Sweden, Holland, Germany, countries that are having the LEAST amount of fatalities, you'll find most women are, in fact, having natural, vaginal births, regardless of whether or not they're breech or "too big". It's EXTREMELY rare for a child to actually be "too big" for a mothers pelvis - more times than not the issue at hand is not size, but positioning. It's much more condusive for a woman to give birth in a squatting position - to be on your back literally offers about half of the opening space as squatting does. No one is disputing that there are situations where medical intervention is necessary, however this country and it's system is beyond abusive of those necessities. Over 95% of hospitals births involve one form of intervention or another, and that is putting mothers and children at an increased risk. Please, for your own health and the health of your family, do all the research you can, learn the facts, read studies, statistics, use your voice and empower yourself. I realize that living in a society where health care providers are pretty much used for anything makes it hard for us to fathom that there are systems working AGAINST us rather than for us, but it's the plain truth. If we would typically look into a mechanic before trusting them with our cars, contractors before trusting them in our homes, research hotels before staying in them, research electronics before buying them, then I don't understand how a person could literally put the life of themselves and their child in the hands of a doctor WITHOUT properly researching them first.

Janice - posted on 09/16/2011

1,890

18

63

Unfortunately there are many places in the US in which it is not safe to deliver a breech baby safely because no-one has been trained to do so.

Assessing risk is very hard to do because the risks of a c-section are not the same as the risks for a breech vaginal birth.

Additionally, insurance companies have a huge hand in making decisions in the medical field. So just like 2 different people may weigh the same risks and make different decisions, that is now being done by insurance companies who then make policies which affect whether or not anyone else can weigh the risks and make their own decision.

Truly whether or not a breech vaginal delivery is as safe as a c-section differs case by case.

Sherri - posted on 09/16/2011

9,593

15

387

There actually is no hospital here that will deliver a breech baby vaginally. It has to automatically be a C-Section it is NOT an option.

Also not sure were your from but midwives are pretty rare here you go to an OB for all your needs.

Elizabeth - posted on 09/15/2011

16

1

1

The Canadian equivalent of the ACOG issued a statement that breech birth with an experienced provider is safer than a C-section. Unfortunately, for the last 20-30 yrs the number of doctors trained in vaginal breech birth has been declining. So if you find someone (ask a local midwife, she'll know) who's comfortable delivering breech, you're completely justified in following your gut instinct!

Sherri - posted on 09/13/2011

9,593

15

387

Melissa that is your interpretation. A breech birth is NOT safer vaginally than having C-Section, delivering multiples vaginally is NOT safer than having a C-Section. A baby that can NOT fit down the birth canal will die without a C-Section.

My friend had a C-Section due to a breech baby no option they will NOT deliver vaginally. My cousin had a C-section because her daughter could not fit down the birth canal.


So although you do not think that they require medical intervention I think I will follow the advice of a trained professional any day.over your opinion of what should or shouldn't be done.

Melissa - posted on 09/13/2011

441

41

25

Sherri you're right, "always" was obviously not including the 3% of worldwide births that REQUIRE medical intervention.

Merry - posted on 09/11/2011

9,274

169

248

Yeah there's no way a footling breech with a prolapsed cord on a preemie is safer then a section. Lol or identical twins in the same sack with a knot in their cords, yeah not going to be a safe vaginal birth there!
Placenta previa? I could go on.......
Yes in a perfectly healthy mom and healthy baby, and an uncomplicated pregnancy they'd wrest birth is vaginal, but when crap happens it's surgery or death sometimes.

Sherri - posted on 09/11/2011

9,593

15

387

@ Melissa Christina natural, vaginal delivery is always safer for both mother AND child.

It is not ALWAYS safer. If there are complications or a breech baby it is not ALWAYS safer to have a vaginal birth for mother and especially for baby.

Sara - posted on 09/11/2011

9,313

50

584

I'm holding my 9 day old breech baby right now who was delivered via c-section. It was never a question for me to do a c/s. With all the info I had I would not have wanted to attempt a vaginal delivery.

Melissa - posted on 09/11/2011

441

41

25

Christina natural, vaginal delivery is always safer for both mother AND child. I don't know where your doctor got their information, but you should do a quick search on some of the risk factors associated with the drugs given during a cesarean as well as the statistics of children born as such. Children born via cesarean are less likely to breast feed, more likely to have respiratory issues, be born non-responsive, there's a high risk of being cut (which has in fact happened to children I know, it is very common), the instance of PPD is higher in women (which does effect the children) the children are more likely to develope depression and learning disabilities when they get older. None of these risks are specifically associate with vaginal birth, they have, however, been proven to be caused by the drugs administered during a cesarean, as well as the lack of hormones from the mother that are stopped from being released with medical intervention.

Melissa - posted on 09/11/2011

441

41

25

Most doctors won't or don't want to vaginally deliver a breech birth only because the insurance company covering their rears tell them not to. Up until 20 years ago doctors were routinely trained in breech birth, today they are taught a cesarean is required. If you want a natural or vaginal delivery I suggest going with a midwife. Obstetricians are actually surgeons that simply specify in childbirth. Midwives are EXPERTS in childbirth. Our society tries to discredit them but believe me they are so much more than people would ever believe. It's been proven childbirth is much more relaxing, successful and pain-free when a midwife (and maybe also a doula) are utilized RATHER than an OB/GYN.

Dianne - posted on 09/09/2011

211

23

24

i must admit to only reading half of the pages on this, but i had my breech son (first child) vaginally and would again no problem, however my choice was based on a lot of research over many weeks and the knowledge that if something wasnt 'right' that i would go for the section, i knew that my son was in the best position possible for breech (actually he was in the second best until labour when he moved his feet to his head), his weight was in the ideal range for success, i dont have a narrow pelvis by any means, what position is best to labour in, etc, etc
so i was armed with plenty of knowledge to start with but even so if the doc that finally came hadnt been working that day i would have sectioned anyway as i had NO trust in the earlier docs to have a safe outcome but lucky for me one who knew what he was doing rocked up before i really started contracting and i was happy to see how i went and had a wonderful outcome and happy healthy bub and mum went home after the usual 2day stay

Christina - posted on 09/02/2011

73

18

10

My doctor told me that a c-section is always more dangerous for the mother, while safer for the baby, and a vaginal birth is safer for mom while more dangerous for the baby. She meant any vaginal birth, not just breech birth. There are just a lot of variables in there - things that can't be foreseen. With a c-section, the baby is safe inside and then, within minutes, is outside with minimal chance of injury. She asked me that, while a breech birth will PROBABLY go well, do you want to risk your baby's life for a "probably?" If it doesn't go well, it goes REALLY, REALLY bad. This being said, I was a breech myself - and I was born vaginally with no problems. My first daughter was also breech. She was vertex during the entire pregnancy, but turned at 39 weeks. I wasn't given any choice with her - I had to have a c-section as soon as they discovered the situation. I wasn't in labor yet, but I was already 3cm dilated. She was free floating, with her feet and the umbilical cord near my cervix. They considered it an emergency because the cord could prolapse if my water broke. I had the section within 2 hours of finding out she was breech. I was disappointed that I didn't even get to experience labor at all. It wasn't the birth I had pictured in my mind. We didn't even have our bags with us, and a VERY nice nurse bought us a disposable camera to take pictures with - since all our stuff was at home. She was born perfectly healthy. Although breech birth in a woman who has already had a baby are less dangerous, just the fact that she has had one baby doesn't mean the breech baby's head won't get trapped. Part of the problem is that a breech baby's head can't "mold" when it's not coming out the right way. It has no way of "squeezing" through the birth canal, and the chin can get "hung up". I just don't feel it would be worth the risk of a catastrophy. C-sections really aren't too bad. I've had a c and I've had vaginal. At least with the c-section you don't have to sit on, or pee on, the stitches you get like you do after a vaginal birth (if you tear...)

If you see this, leave this form field blank.
Powered by RESPECT not THUMPS

Join Circle of Moms

Sign up for Circle of Moms and be a part of this community! Membership is just one click away.

Join Circle of Moms