Declawing a cat.

[deleted account] ( 474 moms have responded )

I recently got a new kitty. We were scheduling his needling and working out when he would be the proper age to get fixed. Declawing was suggested to be done at the same time. That way he would only need to be put under once. I looked up pros and cons before i decided. Turns out they don't just remove the claw. They amputate the entire first knuckle!! http://www.declawing.com/htmls/declawing... So Jinx will not have this done, instead I'm getting him soft paws. Little caps that go over his claws. http://www.mylot.com/w/image/1875350.asp... They are pretty cool actually. They look like a recent manicure:P



What do you think about declawing? Would you do it?

Personally I think its inhumane and it should be illegal. It actually is in plenty of countries. Not mine sadly.

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[deleted account]

Like the fact that its a probable cause of arthritis. Doing so knowing it can possibly cause arthritis definitely does not have the animals well being in mind.

Sherri - posted on 08/26/2011

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Jennifer it is still unnecessary and done for NO reason other than the comfort of the owner, with little thought to the well being of the animal.

Jennifer - posted on 08/26/2011

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As with any surgery, if you go to a butcher.... you get a heck of a mess to clean up and can have all sorts of problems. If you do your research and get a good surgeon, as you should do even for spay/neuter, you won't be likely to have any problem with the declaw process. If done properly, it does NOT alter the cats personality at all. Actually Spay/neuter alters their personality almost 100% of the time but declawing does not. They are not more prone to arthritis in later years. They do not become more aggressive and they still have some defense, although they must be kept as indoor only cats once the claws are removed. My cat even smacks the dog in the head and the dog will leave him alone once he has done that.

Declawing not only saves the furniture, it also saves the cataracts of the other animals in the house. It also prevents some cases of "Cat Scratch disease". The cat has to actually bite you to transmit the disease if it does not have claws to do it with.

Kate CP - posted on 08/26/2011

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Rebecca: Yes, spaying and neutering your cats is essential to their health, whereas declawing them is not.

Spaying a cat not only prevents unwanted kittens, but keeps her from getting infections and cancer. It can help keep males from getting into fights.

Declawing a cat saves your couch. So yes, I see a big difference and I'm comfortable with that, too.

Sherri - posted on 08/26/2011

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Cats use their front claws to defend themselves not their back. They can't defend themselves from a predator with only their back claws.



Ya spaying them and neutering them is responsible and does not hinder them at all.



Declawing is barbaric and can 100% alter their personalities and cause several other life long problems. That never needed to be done other than the comfort of the owner.

Rebecca - posted on 08/26/2011

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And wait, people don't have a problem with cutting out their reproductive bits, but have a problem with declawing? Really?

Rebecca - posted on 08/26/2011

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My cat is declawed. They only take out the front set of claws. The back set is what a cat uses to defend itself, so I see no problem with declawing whatsoever.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/26/2011

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LOL Leigh, yes indeed your cats are missing toes. The first knuckle is completely removed during the declaw surgery.

[deleted account]

I declawed both of my cats. They are not missing any of their toes. I decided to declaw when the cat jumped on my 12 month olds head (she was just learning to walk, the child, not the cat) started to slide off and dug his claws into her head. He almost got her in the eye. So it was either get rid of the cat or his claws. They are strictly indoor cats.

Adrienne - posted on 08/24/2011

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Wow. So because I chose to declaw my cat, as a last resort, for her own safety, I should have the tips of my fingers cut off??? Seems pretty extreme.

Jennifer - posted on 08/24/2011

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When I start destructively shredding the top of the sofa back and scaling people's butts while on the toilet at 6 am and will not be accepted into anyone's home so I need to go to a shelter, I will have that done post haste!

Katrina - posted on 08/24/2011

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if you want to get a cat declawed I think you should also have the tips of your fingers cut off.

Jennifer - posted on 08/23/2011

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Sadly in our area the cat section of the humane society is overcrowded. There is just not enough room for what we have. Especially now that our economy is in the toilet. There are a lot of people relinquishing their pets because they can no longer afford to care for them.

Merry - posted on 08/23/2011

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Our humane society is much different. Hopefully ones in your area will be updated soon! Ours has 2-3 cats in a bathroom stall sized plastic walled cage as tall as the ceiling. It's fairly sound resistant so the noise isn't bad, each room has a cat tree and beds and hiding place. And no cat is killed unless it's not adoptable.

Idk about the ritualistic killings so I'm not sure how we deal with that here but I sure hope they weed out the wackos!

Jennifer - posted on 08/23/2011

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I have been to the humane society here and it is loud and confusing and scary to an animal. So many animals making noise in close spaces. No ability to sleep. It is possibly the next step to a good home or it might be another gateway to hell or even early euthanasia.

My next door neighbor used to work at the humane society and are you aware there are some people who get cats at certain times of the year specifically with the intent to use them in rituals and often killing them? They try to screen those people out but if you know the right thing to say, they will give you the animal.

Merry - posted on 08/23/2011

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That's valid jennifer, but if you chose the humane socuety it's just a step away from living in a safe and loving home with your fingers intact!

Jennifer - posted on 08/23/2011

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If I had to choose between an abusive home, living on the street or in a cage at a shelter WITH the tops of my fingers OR a loving home that I feel safe and protected and loved without the tops of my fingers.... take my freaking finger tops please!

Desiree - posted on 08/23/2011

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Firstly a cat is best to be done when they are around 6 months old it stops them from spraying as well. secondly declawing is cruel the cat would be unable to protect himself should he need to. I own 6 moggies I would never ever consider that. And yes it should be as illegal as docking a dogs tail or piking their ears (I live in South Africa) I have yet to find a good enough reason to do something so ugly.

Adrienne - posted on 08/23/2011

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Marina- I'm sure that's the case and they just used the least invasive/quickest healing procedure to do it. Like I said, it was over 14 years ago so my memory is fuzzy.

Jane- I tried it on several occasions. There was absolutely no way she would let me trim her claws. She was one of those "touch my paws and see how quickly I will shred you" kind of cats before she was declawed. Sweet as can be in all other respects, but her paws were strictly off limits.

Jane - posted on 08/22/2011

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One of our cats can't fully retract his claws. Instead of declawing him I just trim his claws once a week. He tolerates it because, I think, he has made the connection between what I do and not getting hung up on things.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/22/2011

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Adrienne, it sounds like you did it for the right reason, but I am sorry to inform you, there is no way possible to just removed the claw, you have to remove the entire knuckle. If you do not, there will be regrowth for sure...but there is no possible way to remove just the claw.

Adrienne - posted on 08/22/2011

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Okay, so as a rule I am not for declawing. As a rule. I did HAVE to do it once. I came home from work on 2 or 3 occasions to find that my cat had gotten caught on a piece of furniture or the rug. She was a cross between a calico and a Maine Coon and because she was a smallish cat with enormous paws, she ended up not being able to fully retract her front claws. We figured that the risk of declawing was less than the risk of serious injury to herself. The procedure the vet used was minimally invasive. I seem to remember (this was 14 years ago) that they only removed the claw, not the knuckle.



That said, she's the only cat that I have ever owned that I had it done to. And I won't unless we get another cat who has the same kind of issue.



**edit to add: Also, even though she was an adult, she healed normally and was perfectly happy and healthy and still "attacked" things in playing.

Jennifer - posted on 08/21/2011

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I find it ironic that this post is about declawing and it seems the claws have come out. LOL

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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I think you are much more worked up about this than needed.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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I don't have ANY clue how you could have POSSIBLY thought my last statement was a pissing match. I was saying I have never EVER worked with a behaviorist that was trained only for that. I have NO IDEA what your training is. How the hell is that a pissing match?

Kate CP - posted on 08/21/2011

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Okay, I don't know how this got into a pissing match with you Marina but I'm fucking done.

Christ almighty.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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Also Loureen, I keep thinking about your poor birds. You may want to take them to the vet also to make sure they are on the proper diet., Obviously they do not have their tool to be eating properly with, and they can ensure that they are eating all the right foods and vitamins to help their beaks grow back. So sorry about this, I have a pit in my stomach thinking about it.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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Kate, there has been definitely more than one thread, and more than one time. Truthfully, I have no idea what your training is with behavior, or who you were taught by. We have never discussed that. I cannot say that you actually do or don't know more about animal behavior. Quite frankly, if we had to send a pet to a behaviorist, of course for extreme cases, it would usually be the a Veterinary doctor that specialists in animal behavior. We have never sent any to places that were not veterinary doctor specialists. So I truly have nothing to compare your experience to.



Edited to fix wording

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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That is a shame Loureen. I have never heard of anyone doing that before. Well, hopefully they can grown back...beaks normally grow so if no permanent damage was done...hopefully they will. You may want to have them checked out by a bird specialist, or at least a vet at a regular office that deals with birds. Some don't. We only had one vet that worked with birds where I worked. (actually come to think of it, I have only worked with 2 doctors that worked with them). I wish you and your new feathered friends luck.

Charlie - posted on 08/21/2011

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Ive had them for about a week or two , the stump of beak is still attached to the face but it is cut right back to a flat broad stump , it looks weird and I feel bad for them when i give them some corn and they cant even peck the kernals out.

I really dislike humans sometimes.

Jennifer - posted on 08/21/2011

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Just got to spend an afternoon with the rescue cat we had declawed a while ago. He is SPOILED. My sister has given him his own bedroom. One chair in the living room has a special bed for him with a dangle ball on it. He is fed dry food all day and moist food at night. He has no signs of pain when walking and shows no signs of Arthritis. He has however become deaf so she will actually touch the bed, chair or couch where he is sleeping before she touches him so he knows she is coming. I have never seen a cat as spoiled as he is and all of this would never have been possible if he still had his claws.

Kate CP - posted on 08/21/2011

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Oooooookay.

First, it was sarcasm. I know it's not easy to read it on the internet, but damn.

Second, the ONLY time I have ever implied that I was more experienced than you was when it comes to canine behavior and training. And, quite honestly, I think I do have more experience as an actual pet training instructor and pet behavior specialist than a vet tech (even one with years of experience in the field of veterinary medicine) when it comes to training a dog and it's behavior.

So, I honestly have no fucking clue what you're bugging out for. If you wanted to jump up and down and say "Ooh, ooh! I know more than Kate does about this!" well, bully for you. I could care less. I was talking about my personal experience and my personal opinion and for some reason you saw that as me trying to say that I had more experience as a surgical assistant in one damn year than you've had in how ever many years you've been in the field.

So, whatever. Be insulted all you frickin' want. Yes, I bow to the mighty Marina. She doth know all about cats' claws.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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How long have you had them for? If the actually body that they are attached to was not damaged, I hope they can grow back. When I have assisted in beak trims, we have to watch for the quick. Your poor birds! I am happy to hear you are providing them with a great home!



Edited to add**what does your vet say? Do they think they will grow back? have they started to?

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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And, on animal threads in the past you have ALWAYS implied that my training was minimal and that you were more experienced. You an I both know how things have gone in the past.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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Kate this is specifically what I was referring to "After all the surgeries I've seen and assisted in (almost as many as you, Marina"

And I am sure if you worked in a busy practice, you probably witness many surgical procedures. I am fine that you disagree with me, but if you have read every one of my posts, you would probably see that I am not 100% for it. I think in some circumstances it is the best option instead of being abandoned or euthinized. I don't like it either, but I think with the alternatives that people will do, it is better. Also, for owners with auto immune disorders (especially that onset already having cats) it is the best option for the family without having to rid their home of the beloved pet.

Kate CP - posted on 08/21/2011

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I *NEVER* said I had more experience than you. I never even implied it. And I could give two shits how long you spent assisting in surgery.

In MY opinion, which is what I said the first fucking time, is that declawing a cat is in my top three worst surgical procedures I've ever seen and yes, I've seen more than 3.

You assume because I don't agree with you that I'm trying to out-do you or something and it's really god damned annoying.

Charlie - posted on 08/21/2011

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They have stumps which means they cant properly groom themselves or peck at veggies and fruit properly , apparently some people do it when they have lots of chooks to stop cannibalisation but that says to me they have a shit load of chooks crammed in one space which I detest.
I wont be buying from that person again but I am glad I can give those chooks a good life here , if it was done very young sometimes it can grow back a little ..heres hoping.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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Loureen, why would someone do that to your birds? Beaks can be trimmed, but they are connected to the face! I don't understand why someone would do that. That is horrific.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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Once again, I was telling you 10 years in surgery vs 1 is a BIG ass difference.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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Usually your attitude about who has more experience is ALWAYS dick swinging.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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Oh, and yes we would also have cheap male nueter day...10-15...an experienced vet that has them knocked out and ready one after another can get them done in 1 1/2 hours. It is a very simple quick procedure that takes about 5 minutes from the time it is on the table, to being done, sometimes less time.

Kate CP - posted on 08/21/2011

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What the hell? When did I say I wanted to get into a dick swinging contest with you? For Christ sakes, Marina, get a grip.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 08/21/2011

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Kate, do you REALLY want to compare surgical resumes? No problem.

The first clinic I worked at, I became lead surgical tech the first 3 months that I was there. Each doctor had a day assigned to them for surgery. It started at 7am, ans usually did not end until 4pm or so This could range from 4 surgeries, to 14+ depending on what they were. I am trained to administer pre anesthetic meds, and anesthesia, place an endotrachea tubes in cats and dogs, prep for surgery, monitor patient during surgery, assist. I was at that clinic for 3 years.

The next clinic I worked for, I was there 5+ years, I was a co lead surgical tech, and the lead general tech. Surgeries were also rotated, but they ran from 1-3pm, and was a maximum of 4 per doctor, and there were 2 doctors in surgery at the same time. Once again, I preformed the same duties. I also know how to place a urinary cathedar in males (females are so extremely difficult, doctors even had trouble doing them....and they usually don't block the way males do), I can suture a simple laceration once the doctor rids it of the bad tissue, I even spayed my own dog with the doctor assisting me.

This does not include my entire duties, it is a long list of medical procedures that I was trained directly by doctors to perform. This also does not include emergency surgeries, typically bloats, explority sx, pyometras,or splenectomies. We would have anywhere from 4-6 emergency surgeries per month. One night we actually had 3.

I am sure you have a very good strong surgical background, I do not question that. 8+ years of me working lead surgery (the 2 that I mentioned were the busiest places I worked for, I was not including the others) does not compare to one year of being a vet tech. That is what I am trying to say.

Charlie - posted on 08/21/2011

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Off topic but I was really sad when I got home with my two new Isa brown chooks and they had been debeaked :( WTF kinda person uses a hot knife to chop off its beak ??

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