feeding toddler...

Cheyenne - posted on 06/17/2011 ( 8 moms have responded )

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my son is 16 months old and he will pretty much eat anything i give him. but some people think( my sister in law) think i shouldnt let him feed himself like he does. recently i started giving him grapes and he eats the whole thing, skin and all. my sister in law is one of those parents that cuts up food into little pieces when its a baby. her youngest daughter is 3 years old and she still tells her how to eat. i mean i know there are moms out there who have strict diets, vegiterians, eat whatever, for there kids. but i think its the parents desion on how to let there child eat. i trust my son, and its not like im not there when hes eating his food. im close by if i have to leave. i just think its funny because my sis in law is telling me hot dogs are the #1 cause of choking for kids, and grapes are # 2. if you cant learn to trust your child from when they start feeding themselves then how are you going to trust them later down the road when they want to borrow the car, or want to walk down the street to there friends house?

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[deleted account]

Cheyenne, this is copied and pasted from www.babycenter.com. Here's the link to the page if you want to read the whole article http://www.babycenter.com/0_foods-that-c...





Choking hazards to watch out for

Large chunks: A chunk of food larger than a pea can get stuck in your child's throat. Vegetables like carrots, celery, and green beans should be diced, shredded, or cooked and cut up. Cut fruits like grapes, cherry tomatoes, and melon balls into quarters before serving, and shred or cut meats and cheeses into very small pieces.



Small, hard foods: Hard candies, cough drops, nuts, seeds, and popcorn are potential choking hazards.



Soft, sticky foods: Avoid chewing gum and soft foods like marshmallows and jelly or gummy candies that might get lodged in your child's throat.



Peanut butter: Be careful not to give your toddler large dollops of peanut butter or other nut butters, which can be difficult to swallow. Instead, spread nut butter thinly on bread or crackers. You might want to try thinning it with some applesauce before spreading it.



More choking prevention:



•Avoid letting your child eat in the car since it's hard to supervise while driving.

•If you're using a rub-on teething medication, keep a close eye on your toddler as it can numb his throat and interfere with swallowing.

Foods to avoid: 24 to 36 months

Choking hazards: Even though your child is becoming a more competent eater, there's still a chance he'll choke on his food. Continue to avoid the choking hazards listed above, and discourage your child from eating while walking, watching TV, or doing anything else that might distract him from his meal.



Foods to avoid: 3 to 5 years

Choking hazards: Your child is a very competent eater now, but you should still be on the lookout for pieces of food that he could choke on. Keep cutting his food into small pieces, especially things like grapes and pieces of hot dog that could completely block his airway if inhaled. Continue to avoid popcorn, whole nuts, hard candies, and chewing gum. And discourage your child from eating when distracted.

Sherri - posted on 06/17/2011

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I am not picky about feeding my children but I will tell you, you definitely should be cutting grapes at least in half and then he can feed himself and hot dogs are another one that need to be cut into itty bitty pieces. She is not kidding when she says that those are the biggest two choking hazards with children. If he were to choke on them and they were to get lodged just right you could lose your child. Why not take the two seconds and be safe and then your child can still feed himself with the cut up food.

It has zero to do with trusting your child that is ludacris. It is simply that if it accidentally goes down the wrong way etc and it lodges so deep in their throats they choke to death.

Happy - posted on 06/17/2011

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Trust has nothing to do with it. Accidents happen and most small children are unable to dislodge the item themselves. If it is larger then a cheerio, cut it!

[deleted account]

My son is 3 and I still cut up his hot dogs and grapes. Anything round that can be easily lodged and not easily removed is a choking hazzard, IMO. I also don't let him have hard candy yet and he only gets a lolly pop if I'm right there with him. There's a difference between trusting our kids when they're older, to walk down the street to a friend's house, and giving them something that could potentially harm them. The way I see it, taking an extra 30 seconds out of my life to cut grapes in half is worth it, when compared to the potential loss of my child from him choking.

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Cheyenne - posted on 06/17/2011

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i didnt really ask for your opinions i was just making a statement. im not gonna be one of those moms who hover around there kids 24/7. maybe its because im younger but its my child. i dont tell you how to raise your chid or what not or what to do.

Sherri - posted on 06/17/2011

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So why post this for our opinions. if your going to continue to jeopardize your son's safety anyways????

Cheyenne - posted on 06/17/2011

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well you all have your own opinion. im there with him and i will do whatever i feel is right just as you would with your children.

[deleted account]

I've heard the same statistics that your SIL mentioned. I don't have hard evidence though. I just use basic common sense. If my daughter seems to have trouble eating a certain food then I cut it. For example, I make my own chicken nuggets. Once I got lazy and cut them in bigger pieces. My (then) two year old was having trouble with the bigger pieces, so I cut them smaller. No biggie.

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