First thing that pops into your head...

Kate CP - posted on 09/10/2011 ( 239 moms have responded )

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What's the first thought in your head when you see a mom feeding a baby (6 months or younger) from a bottle?

Not meant to be judgmental or rude and no hurt feelings here. I just want genuine insight into this vision.

Personally, my first thought it "I wonder why she's not breastfeeding?"

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Sarah - posted on 09/16/2011

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The thing is, I guess the nurses or whoever have an awful lot to do already....without them having to sit and come up with a personalised plan of action for each woman.

Plus, I think the nurse who "helped" me (I was one of the ones who had my babies face shoved onto my boob for 40mins while me and baby were both crying hysterically) really thought she was helping........she said a few times "I don't know why you're crying, I'm trying to help!!"
I think it would be very difficult to change some people's views on what constitutes as good help.

I also think that although I could easily blame the nurses for my not breastfeeding.......in all honesty, if I'd cared enough about doing it, I possibly could have powered through and ended up breastfeeding. However, for me, even knowing that "Breast is Best", it just wasn't that important to me. I didn't want to spend any more time with a miserable baby and a miserable me, trying to do something that made me feel awful and it hurt......I wanted to enjoy those precious newborn moments......not look back and only see stress and anxiety.

There's SO many different variables...........as Mary rightly said (as always! hehe) it makes it hard to figure out how to help.

Mary - posted on 09/16/2011

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I've sort of stayed away from this thread, and then came back this morning and read through a lot of it. It's been a bit enlightening as to why breastfeeding is such a difficult thing to support, promote, and sustain. Everyone has such a widely varying view about what "they" (LC's, healthcare professionals, hospitals, LLL, etc.) should be doing - and a lot of these opinions contradict each other. It seems as if a fair number of people think that they were failed by individuals who *should* have been more helpful.

The problem is - very few of us agree on what is helpful, and what is detrimental. One of us found the LC at the hospital too invasive, and didn't like her manipulating our breast into the baby's mouth. Another one of us felt like she didn't help enough, and just left us to figure it out on our own without really showing us how to get the baby latched.

Some of us feel that we are too harshly judged for supplementing with formula - and other's believe it is a sin for "them" to make formula so readily available.

On of us thinks our ped is ill-informed about our baby's lack of weight-gain, and too quick to suggest supplementation, while someone else thinks that LLL lactivist doesn't understand our baby's desperate cries of hunger even after they have nursed, or our absolute conviction that our baby is not getting enough, even when we have been nursing them every half hour around the clock for days on end.

This one was too pushy. That one was too permissive. This one doesn't know enough. That one didn't listen. This one just grabbed my boob, and shoved it in the baby's mouth. That one just dumped the baby at the bedside, and expected me to know what to do.

Breastfeeding is being shoved in our face.

There needs to be more breastfeeding education and support.

I read through all of this, and really, it's not at all surprising that breastfeeding isn't more common. "We" all say that there needs to be more (or 'better') support - but there's no agreement anywhere on how or what that support should be.

Lady Heather - posted on 09/10/2011

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Ha. I saw some ladies giving my sister "the look" when she pulled out a bottle of pumped milk for her kid at the mall. Given how many women pump these days it's probably not safe to assume it's formula in the bottle, that's for sure.

Mary - posted on 09/16/2011

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Sarah, I think you touched on something absolutely crucial to whether or not a woman is successful in breastfeeding:

her personal level of determination and commitment to it

I also think you show a rare capacity to be honest about it.

The truth is, many, many women are not all that receptive to the help, support, and education that is available to them with regards to breastfeeding. I think a huge variety of factors play into that - being hormonal and sleep deprived are two of the biggest. However, I also think that many of us possess this deep-seated belief that because breastfeeding is "natural", we really shouldn't need that much help with it. Therefore, many of us either avoid seeking assistance, or reject it when it is offered, since to do so would be tantamount to admitting that we are not a naturally "good" mother. I also think that a fair amount of people view needing a lot of assistance with breastfeeding as a sign that something really is "wrong", be it our supply, our nipples, or our baby's suck - thereby excusing our struggles as the result of an unnatural, or insurmountable problem.

As to Laura's assertion that " ...Yet again medical staff needs to treat every person individually and not get into a system of 'helping' 'their' way...", I think that really oversimplifies things. First of all, even with a rising section rate, the greater majority of women are still having vaginal deliveries. Barring any complications, most of us are discharged within 48 hours (or less) from the time of delivery. Of those, most women do leave the hospital breastfeeding; it's not until days or weeks later that they make the switch to formula. Therefore, the bigger issue is what (if any) support they receive at home.

Where I delivered, there was a lactation "warm line" that patients could call after they were discharged. They could call in with any questions or concerns, as well as coming in for more hands-on help. The problem is, the onus is on the nursing mother to pursue that support. The same is true for groups such as La Leche; you have to seek them out. Many of us simply do not have the patience, determination or energy to do so once we are home. I sure as shit didn't!

I had absolutely no trouble nursing my daughter when I was still in the hospital. It wasn't until about day 3, when my mil came in, that things started to unravel. I had no unusual issues - just a baby who was suddenly nursing every hour or so without cessation, and nipples that were becoming increasing sore and cracked. My confidence faltered, my reserves were shot, and I began to wonder if I was "doing it wrong". I never once considered calling either that warm line or LLL - especially since my worst moments were occurring in the middle of the night, when I alone was up with this tiny baby I felt I was somehow failing.

What saved me was having both a mother and sister who had exclusively breastfed, and the absolute conviction that if they could do it, then dammit, so could I! So despite my pride, I did call my mother at 3am, crying hysterically that Molly was starving, and my nipples were about to fall off. And in the way that only a mother can - she got me through the worst of it. She was at my home in less than 20 minutes (in her nightgown, no less!), and gave me the encouragement and support to muddle through.

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Erin - posted on 10/02/2011

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** Mod Notice **

Ok guys, this thread has been on the first page for a couple of weeks and is over 200 posts so we are locking it.

Thanks for your contributions.

Erin - DM Mod

Kate - posted on 10/02/2011

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Laura -

"It IS unusual where I am to see a woman bottle-feeding a baby, but I think that's because they are shamed into staying home...which I think is really sad. "

This is so funny for me - where I am breastfeeding mom's are usually too embarrassed to go out in public!!

I breastfed both my littlies and man did I get foul looks for doing it in public... and lots of comments too! You'd swear I had a grown man attached to my boob!!

I was very subtle with it - covered myself and baby with a blanket or towelling nappy but there was still lots of "judgement" for that!

Back to the original question though: my first thought would be (jealously) "wish I could have another tiny baby to feed, cuddle, nurture and be in love with"!!

Cynthia - posted on 10/02/2011

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wow just read the post on this page and as a mom that chose both i know both sides of this debate when it comes down to it i don't think it makes a difference which you do. as long as you feed your baby why does it matter. defiantly not something to get so mad about or whatever the emotion coming from Mary.

one thing i do want to ask Mary -How did your baby deal with all your compilations did you give a bottle while you were working on your supply? do you think you baby could sense that you were uncomfortable if so do you thank that was the best thing for your tinny baby?

I gave my breastfeed son formula just so his dad could feed b4 i got my pump i gave him the stuff the hospital gave me. when we left the hospital they gave us a can we actually ended up using the whole can over the last 3 months and then we got a new can we have not opened it yet but we have it just to be ready if we need it or want it.

for all you anti bottle moms how do you feel when you see a dad feeding his baby. do you assume that it is pumped?

i will never understand the big deal. with my 1st i did not even try to breast feed that does not make me a bad mom. i breast feed my baby now does that mean i am better??

i think breastfeeding is way easier then bottle feeding so to say that it is selfish makes no sense to me. this is my opinion.

Cynthia - posted on 10/02/2011

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i bottle fed my 1st son and now i am breastfeeding his baby brother. until i started breastfeeding my baby i never thought anything negative about a bottle but now if i saw it i would wonder too.

Isobel - posted on 10/02/2011

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"I wish I could touch it's feet...if the mother wouldn't rip me a new one that is ;P...that's what I think when I see any newborn...I don't care what they are eating.



It IS unusual where I am to see a woman bottle-feeding a baby, but I think that's because they are shamed into staying home...which I think is really sad.



I don't think it's "selfish" to preserve your own sanity for the sake of your baby...I think a healthy, happy mother is FAR more important to your baby than breast milk.



and yes...I breastfed...cause I wanted to. But I don't think that gives me any right to judge anybody else for their decision to maintain their own sanity.

Karla - posted on 10/02/2011

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@ Mary, ”But I didn't give up and I kept putting her on the breast even if it was uncomfortable or even painful and my supply caught up so... yeah. I didn't have such an easy go of it - but still I believed it was important to give my child the best start to life as long as I had the means to do so.”



It is commendable to stick with it through difficulties; it sounds as though you had a very difficult time, and it’s always good to hear of moms working through difficulties and finding success.



On the other hand, I believe it is incorrect to make sweeping assumptions that others haven’t given it a good try, or that they are selfish because, for whatever reason, they chose not to bf.



I’m not trying to argue the advantages of breastfeeding or the merits of sticking with it through difficulties. I’m just saying as moms it’s more progressive to accept where each person is, and encourage them in each parenting hurdle they meet. I’m struggling to find the words for what I’m thinking, but the bottom line is that I’ve seen judgments turn people away permanently. I believe the more we accept differing methods and support one another; the better it will be for future generations to improve upon our efforts as parents and peers.

Karla - posted on 10/02/2011

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@ Mary ( "But I didn't say I go up to people and say what I'm thinking to their face. The OP didn't ask if I said this to their face. It's just what I think and I stand by that. "

Mary, my point was that your first thoughts evolved many assumptions; I'm just pointing out another way of seeing things.

Mary Renee - posted on 10/02/2011

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Let's see... the question was "What's the first thought in your head when you see a mom feeding a baby (6 months or younger) from a bottle?"



Argue all you'd like ladies, but I just answered the question honestly. And I honestly believe if you have the financial means to stay home with your child and are not one of the 5% of women with a medical reason preventing you from breastfeeding your child, then you are selfish. That's the first thought that pops in my head - which I believe is what the OP asked.



And yes, you have a "choice" to be selfish. No one is suggesting that your choice to formula feed be taken away or that you need to explain yourself to the clerk when you buy formula. But if you financially can stay with your baby, and you chose not to breastfeed - then I reserve my right to consider you selfish.



The bottom line for me is this: Formula is NOT equal to breastfeeding. As much as the formula companies try to convince customers otherwise, science has not yet come up with a formula that has the same or equal benefits to breastfeeding. So depriving your baby of the best nutrition when you have the financial means of giving it to them is selfish.



Again, no one is arguing against your right to chose to do whatever you want, I just feel bad for the baby that doesn't have that same choice, and is depending on his or her mother to make the best choice for them.



I guess maybe I shouldn't zero in on working mom as being the only group that I think has a valid excuse for using formula as a last resort. Obviously, women who have adopted their children or are taking medication that have prevented them from breastfeeding shouldn't be made to feel judged when they feed their baby a bottle in public.



But I didn't say I go up to people and say what I'm thinking to their face. The OP didn't ask if I said this to their face. It's just what I think and I stand by that.



Also, I am a stay-at-home-mom, not entirely by choice, partially because of the economy but I would feel so horrible about myself if I had the ability to breastfeed and stay home with my baby and I didn't. What is the purpose of my breasts if they aren't for breastfeeding? That's just sad to me. But yeah, we are poor as shit, and even the fancy strollers at second hand stores and on craigslist are STILL expensive!



I also think it's funny that you assume that because this is my opinion, I didn't have cracked and bleeding nipples or a baby that wouldn't latch. For the first 8 or 9 weeks I sometimes started each session crying because it hurt so freaking bad. I was on circle of moms constantly asking about milk blebs (which hurt like hell) and I don't think I spent half a second away from the lansinoh. But hello, that's what you sign up for when you have kids.



***Edited to Add***



Oh yeah, I also had a breast reduction when I was 17 due to scoliosis - which caused me to have an inturned nipple (which required me to use a nipple shield in the first few weeks) as well as causing supply issues from the missing mammory glands. But I didn't give up and I kept putting her on the breast even if it was uncomfortable or even painful and my supply caught up so... yeah. I didn't have such an easy go of it - but still I believed it was important to give my child the best start to life as long as I had the means to do so.

Jennifer - posted on 10/01/2011

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Yup, I agree with Sharon and Karla. It seems very odd to me that women who work should be the only ones who would have the need to use formula. What if a woman has a baby that won't latch properley and even with help from a consultant finds that her nipples crack and bleed leaving her in agony? Or what if she finds the let-down sensation so intense that that she swears or even vomits on the baby? (I know that it made my mother vomit).. I don't think that either of these can really be classed as medical conditions, yet if they are causing breastfeeding to be a horrendous experience instead of one that facilitates bonding and love, then I don't see why the mother should feel the need to continue.. stay at home or not.

Karla - posted on 10/01/2011

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Well Mary, you knew you were getting real prejudice, so here goes.

First, I was a SAHM for many years, and most of the SAHMs I knew were not wearing upscale clothing and pushing high-end strollers about. We had all made a decision to stay home with our children during their early years, and we were all making sacrifices to do that. I was always, always buying our clothes at consignment shops and the Good Will.

Second, just because a mom is a SAHM doesn’t mean there aren’t plenty of reasons to need to formula feed. All the articles/books I have read about breastfeeding indicate the incidence of a physical impediment to breastfeeding is more like 5%, and there are plenty of other reasons for a SAHM to choose formula.

Third, the more this is treated as a battle and/or with judgment, the less likely the general public will accept and embrace breastfeeding; instead it creates an atmosphere of defensiveness.

I find I can be an advocate for breastfeeding without judging and insulting those who choose not to bf.

[deleted account]

"If it looks like a mom who can afford to be a stay-at-home mom, (nice expensive clothes, nicely dress husband, high priced stroller, hanging out in the park between 9-5 instead of being at work... etc... ) then I think "Why isn't she breastfeeding?" But honestly, if you're a stay-at-home mom I don't think there is any excuse for not breastfeeding,"



So now the argument is that a SAHM who wears upscale clothing or has baby in a pricey stroller (which could have been purchased at 2nd hand shops) does not have the CHOICE to feed their baby formula OR breastmilk simply because of their SAHM and possibly money status? A woman does not NEED an excuse to chose formula over breastmilk, or breastmilk over formula. A mother simply needs to feed her child without having to be subjected to judgemental statements. Status of SAHM does not equate to mandatory breastfeeding. It's like saying a SAHM is free from any kind of BFing issues and problems that are associated with nursing just because they are a SAHM, and who might possible be more well off than other moms. Sorry, I disagree 100% with this faulty reasoning.

Mary Renee - posted on 10/01/2011

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It depends on the environment, and I have to admit I'm about to get real prejudiced up in here.

If it looks like a mom who can afford to be a stay-at-home mom, (nice expensive clothes, nicely dress husband, high priced stroller, hanging out in the park between 9-5 instead of being at work... etc... ) then I think "Why isn't she breastfeeding?"

If it's a woman that obviously has to work long hours to support her family and make ends meet, then I'm just happy that she gets that bonding time with her baby, whether it's bottle or boob. I know women that have wanted to breastfeed, and did as long as they could until they had to go back to working 3 different jobs just to support their family - for them, I get it. I even lent my pump to one of them but let's face it, you just can't get as much pumping as you can breastfeeding, and if you're a waitress, cashier, clerk, maid, or working any of the variety of minimum wage jobs available out there in this economy then I don't care what "policies" are available at bigger corporations. I've been a waitress for years. The idea that they would give you a chance to pump every 3-4 hours is inconceivable. They would find a reason to fire you first.

But honestly, if you're a stay-at-home mom I don't think there is any excuse for not breastfeeding, unless you're part of the .001% that actually has a medical reason why you can't. I think when people say they have "personal" reasons (which realistically include concern about how their boobs will look or the unability to look past boobs as something sexual) is most of the time just selfish. I don't know how people can deny their baby what is best, unless it's because they're out there working their butts off to pay for well-baby visits.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 10/01/2011

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Plain and simple, not going to a milk bank, end of debate. I make my own :)

Merry - posted on 10/01/2011

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Ok and if you knew anything about milk banks you'd know that human milk can be pasteurized too. And if you use a milk sharing partnership you pasteurize it at home yourself.
I have been to a dairy farm and while some are better then others the cows do not live to the same cleanliness standards as humans.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 10/01/2011

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Exactly Sharon! I'm a breast feeding mom, I'm a member of the breast feeding moms forum and there are so many on there who act as though you're poisoning your child and being a horrid mom if you give your child formula or a doctor has suggested a *gasp* bottle in case the mom is getting exhausted. There is a woman compairing feeding your baby formula to smoking while pregnant for God's sake!

I say this a lot, I'm adopted I was bottle fed the entire time as a baby. Nothing bad happened to me. I have ADD but that's genetics, the worst childhood illnesses I had were chicken pox and pnuemonia (I only had pnuemonia once compaired to my breast fed hubby who contracted pnuemonia twice and now has any chest cold go into bronchitis) I don't know if that's luck or good genetics or what. But while breast milk may be scientifically proven to be the best thing to give your baby, that doesn't mean that every mom is able to breast feed. Formula thankfully is around for those moms and babies.

[deleted account]

"Then mutter something about effing poison if it's formula. With the increase of milk sharing and social networking there is no excuse for formula"

Ha-ha-ha! Oh this is hysterical! Thanks so much for the chuckle of the day! And this statement, folks, is the very reasons WHY extreme lactivists get such a bad rap. It's pure judgemental bullshit, plain and simple. You wan tto increase more mothers nursing? You want more pro-BFing education, knowledge, awareness? Then the lactivist community needs to start from within and remove the blinders off of others. JMO.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 10/01/2011

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Laura, most cows milk is pasturized and processes. I don't know how many dairy barns you've been in, but the stalls are cleaned, the milking isn't even done by hand. Sheesh.

The only bodily fluid I'd allow into my children's system is blood and plasma because there's actually regulation on that.

Sherri - posted on 10/01/2011

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@With the increase of milk sharing and social networking there is no excuse for formula.

I would rather die first then do this. If I can't breastfeed the only thing my child is getting is formula period. No other woman's bodily fluids are ever entering my child.

Merry - posted on 10/01/2011

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Drinking another humans milk is alot less dangerous then drinking a random cows milk. Cows live knee deep in POOP!

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 10/01/2011

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Candice, didn't your mom ever tell you 'If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all?" If she didn't she should've. It doesn't matter that you haven't yet said it to someone feeding their child formula.

I would NEVER use some stranger's milk to use to feed my baby because I don't know the person. I breast feed myself, but I was raised on formula from day one since I was adopted. I'd rather use that then chance my child's health on someone else's breast milk.

Finally, if you don't like people giving you looks for nursing in public, why on Earth would you do it to someone who isn't nursing in public. For all you know that is breast milk and she doesn't feel comfortable nursing in public.

Candice - posted on 10/01/2011

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I roll my spot check to see what exactly is in the bottle. Then mutter something about effing poison if it's formula. With the increase of milk sharing and social networking there is no excuse for formula. But-big ol' but, I suppose it IS a mother's choice on how she feeds her babe,
I've never gotten crap about nursing nor have I gone up to a stranger and bitched them out for not nursing. I have gotten looks from a few pentecostal types, then I make a smarmy comment or two loudly.

Angela - posted on 09/30/2011

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I am with you Meggy... it is always a cute baby when feeding... quite... sweet and lovely... unless it is something in the bottle bright, pink or purple I do not think of it.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 09/30/2011

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LOl I can't believe I forgot I'd also say cute baby. I honestly don't care how someone feeds their baby as long as it's not kool aid or something crazy like that in a bottle. That's fine for toddlers once in a while, but not a baby

Leeann - posted on 09/30/2011

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cute baby, honestly i have been on both sides of this great debate and just choose not to think anything when i see it.

♥♪Megan♫♥ - posted on 09/29/2011

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The first thing that comes to my mind as a breast feeding mom- tons of things: Maybe she doesn't like to breast feed in public, maybe the baby's adopted, maybe she's baby sitting, the list goes on.

There are so many reasons that even breast feeding moms use bottles (My biggest reason is I live in British Columbia and you can't find an easy place to turn off and nurse up here on drives. The DH or myself make a bottle and hand it to our 7 year old who feeds it to our 6 month old) I can't stand when BF moms get judgemental on non BF moms. Or when they act like a formula feeding mom feels guilty when they stand up for themselves. Breast feeding was my choice, but that doesn't mean it has to be everyone's choice.

Jennifer - posted on 09/26/2011

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With me, unless I'm REALLY warm, my nipples are constantly kind of blue with lack of blood circulation :S... and I found that when my baby latched on the heat of her mouth sent the blood vessels into agonising spasm. It made my toes curl and I felt sick it was so painful. Then afterwards my nipple would look completely white and be flashing pink before eventually turning blue again.. pretty horrible I know!.. so yeah, that's how raynauds affected me. Glad you could still breastfeed Sharon :)

[deleted account]

That's what I figured Laura, Ethan has raynauds and it hurts him when his hands and feet get to cold so I was thinking that it nay heighten the pain and maybe cause issues but I wasn't sure, thanks for the info.

[deleted account]

"Jennifer I'm curious how does raynauds disease affect bf? (I'm being nosy :-)) "

I have Raynaud's too- but it never impacted my ability to nurse. For me, I am so suspectible to the extreme cold weather that my extremities could become frost-bitten very quickly. One reason why I left NJ and moved to Arizona! But since Raynaud's causes the blood vessels to contract and tighten, I suppose that there is a correlation in the milk production? Maybe teh blood vessels squeeze the milk ducts? Hmmmm.....maybe this was one reason why I simply did not produce much milk! OMG I feel that 6 years later I finally have a possible answer why I struggled so much at BFing!

Cara - posted on 09/26/2011

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My opinion on BF. BF is best...but ONLY if thats whats best for mom. Some moms cannot due to various reasons(health condition, preemie baby, lack of milk production, baby wouldn't latch, baby was sick at birth, mom is uncomfortable with bf....etc). If it isn't working for some reason than they need to formula feed. There is nothing wrong with formula feeding. Your child won't be stupid, always sick or anything like that. I think it's sad that BF moms try to force their opinion of BF on other moms. I think instead of spending our time judging other moms on how they feed their children we need to find more productive things to do with our time. At least you are getting to see kids that are being fed instead of those that don't get a meal often. And before anyone asks...yes...I am a BF mom

Angela - posted on 09/25/2011

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I think if people judge or stare or come out and ask you such thing it says more about them. I mean maybe they are insecure and feel better when being judgmental.
Now if one keeps it themselves fine but not anyone has the right to judge or treat a Mom who Bottle or formula feeds to point they are made to feel badly.
My youngest had a horrible latch, and I tired too and I had to pump and kept trying to BF. I got all kinds of stupid unsolicited advice too. I was made to feel like their was something I was doing wrong at times. The thing was I had a physical therapist look at my daughter and she had an injury in birth they feel that caused her to have a bad latch so not much we both could do of it.
I BF as long as I could and pumped an pumped like mad and froze BM. Then it just started to dry up... She needed to drink formula and it was special one and she had to be on it for 28 months. I even got junk when people saw me make her formula milk because one she was over age and two she looks much older than her age due to her length.
Shame on anyone who makes you feel stared down at or excludes you Jennifer.

Jennifer - posted on 09/25/2011

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"Thank goodness! Someone else like me!".. I feel really stared at for bottle feeding my little baby, quite often people actually ask me when I'm out why I'm not breastfeeding. This upsets me as I did try but couldn't because I have raynaud's disease. sigh.

Angela - posted on 09/25/2011

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I did not read all the post...
but I don't think anything because maybe she has breast milk in the bottle and the kid has a bad latch or maybe she is working Mom and it is the best she can do...
I am all for BF but not everyone is able to do it for many reasons. Some of my friends had such easy time with it and some not.
I would be angry if someone judged me with out knowing my circumstances so I treat others like I want to be treated.

Mariah - posted on 09/23/2011

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I was that mom, and let me tell you I caught a lot of dirty looks and rude comments from complete strangers, every single one hurt. I'm an insulin dependent diabetic. My milk took a week to come in and I went home with formula & a BF simulation set up from the hospital. 6 weeks later my milk dried up. It broke my heart because I was committed to BF for as long as I could, hoping to go 6 months or more, but my disease robbed me of that.

I don't wonder about or judge other moms who aren't BF because I don't know their situation.

[deleted account]

Showering is a different thing to expressing though. Maybe it's different countries then, as it is definitely advised not to express if you can bear it here.

Ella - posted on 09/23/2011

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also wearing tight fitting bras when weaning causes blocked ducts and infection, I thought I saw someone mention that earlier so just thought I'd share that

Ella - posted on 09/23/2011

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Ive heard otherwise and Ive just googled it and read some websites its definately advised to express small amounts when stopping feeding. One of them said to have a warm shower and your breasts will leak out any excess. You do need to express to avoid infection and being in pain. And expressing small amounts will decrease your milk supply

[deleted account]

If you can take the discomfort it is advisable to not stimulate your breasts at all because by expressing even a little you are prolonging the pain. Unless there is a medical need such as a blocked duct expressing is not advisable
when stopping bf.

Ella - posted on 09/20/2011

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@ Toni, you do need to express small amounts just only enough for your comfort. Otherwise you end up like my friend in hospital or when I stopped breast feeding my first I was on the verge of hospital until I found a pump at 11pm at night , you can't just leave it.

And agree Julianne, it is proven. While you are breast feeidng your baby is highly proteced as long as you do not use a drop of formula. To get the maxamum benefits you need to breast feed til at least 2 yrs (shame my daughters pretty much self weaning atm as we were hoping to make 2 yrs)

Jenn - posted on 09/20/2011

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My first thought would be to wonder if the baby was being fed breast milk. My second thought would be that if it isn't breast milk, I hope the mother gave it a try before turning to formula.

Merry - posted on 09/20/2011

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I sure wouldn't! The only autistic child I've ever met was one of 8 kids born to a family that didn't believe in birth control and homeschooled home birthed and girls wore dresses etc. I don't *know* he was breastfed but based on his family I'd say odds are he was breastfed. It's odd, I think autism is fairly prevalent and yet this one boy is the only one I've ever known with autism and I really only mat him and his family a few times at a homeschool art class.

Katherine - posted on 09/20/2011

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She's feeding the baby. Second thought, I wonder why she isn't breast feeding. Third thought, maybe she's too embarrassed.

[deleted account]

Unless somebody wants to blame autism on not breastfeeding, I have had two exceptionally healthy children!

Mary - posted on 09/20/2011

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I breastfed my daughter for over 13 months. She was only "sick" once in the first two years of her life - and that was an ear infection she got as a result of a fluid build-up from over-salivating as she cut 4 teeth at once.

However, I don't credit her great immune system to breastfeeding (although I'm sure it helped). Rather, I think it had much more to do with having two dogs, and the fact that she has spent a minimum of an hour (and usually more) outside everyday since she was two weeks old. Those dogs not only exposed her to all kinds of stuff just through her daily contact with them, but they also gave us a reason to be outside everyday.

As well, I don't sanitize at all. My house is (somewhat) "clean", but there are no anti-bacterial products in use here.

Sal - posted on 09/19/2011

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i use baby wipes to clean most everything...i figure they are designed to get stuff off kids, and seen as most of the mess in my house came off a kid, it makes sence really...
but as for healthier babies being bf....my 1st daughter was a sickly malnourished looking little imp....size 0000 at over 6 months and exclusivly bf for that time, so i dont believe for one moment you could look at a dr record or the blue book that we have in aus and tick bf or ff without asking,
for me it is a bit like a ford and volvo the ford will get the job done, it will be done perfectly well just the volvo comes with better safety ratings incase you crash.....

Kate CP - posted on 09/19/2011

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Speaking as a person with an immune disorder (I'm missing neutrophils which is the most important and abundant part of the immune system) I was and still am able to breast feed and no, it doesn't affect my childrens' health. My daughter wasn't sickly as a baby but when she was a toddler up until a year or so ago she would get constant ear infections because her Eustachian tube wasn't long enough to allow her sinuses to drain properly. So she had to have ear tubes put in, but that doesn't have anything to do with her ability to fight off infection. She's been in school since she was 2 and has only had to stay home a handful of times for being sick and it was usually because of her ears or allergies.



My son...he's 7 months old and built like a frickin' mule. He was 4 weeks premature and didn't even spend a moment under a warming lamp or needing help to breathe or even UV therapy! And no, my dates were not off and I know they weren't off because he was conceived with the help of Clomid so I know EXACTLY when he was conceived. :P



Anywhoodle! Mom's white cell count has little or nothing to do with what's passed on to the baby through breast milk. They get the antibodies I've already built up against things I've either been exposed to or vaccinated for but not my leukocytes.



And you better believe that my kids were passed around like a hot potato when they were young! I did NOT want them to have such a fragile system like mine. The immune system is like a muscle: if you don't flex it every so often, it WILL atrophy.

Stifler's - posted on 09/19/2011

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I just use a cloth and rinse it with hot water and hang it to dry until next time.

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