Force-Feeding of Anorexics

Charlie - posted on 03/30/2011 ( 55 moms have responded )

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Anorexia Nervosa is an eating disorder defined as severe, self- inflicted starvation and loss in body weight to at least 15% below that expected for the individual’s sex and height. In the UK (and many other western countries) anorexia nervosa is classified as a mental illness. Anorexia nervosa should not be confused with Bulimia (cycles of bingeing and vomiting). Anorexia is typically associated with women and body image and is thought to be made worse by unrealistic media portrayals of the female body. Having said this, one in ten sufferers is male. Mortality varies between 5% and 18%. Anorexia nervosa has been detected in patients from 6 to 76 years of age and has a far higher incidence in the Developed World, affecting 1% of female adolescents.Patients who are dangerously thin are sometimes force-fed through a naso-gastric (through the nose) tube. Normally, medical treatment cannot be administered without the consent of the patient, however, in the case of mentally ill patients, their distorted perceptions of reality may render them unable to make a choice. Despite this, medical ethics, pragmatics and human rights call the treatment into question.

Should the medical profession force-feed anorexics as part of their treatment?

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[deleted account]

A friend of mine is annorexic (she's not anymore, but she told me once that she always will be because she still gets the bad thoughts about herself whenever she sees herself). She said that back when she first went into treatment (30+ years ago - she's my mom's age) they used to force feed you (via feeding tube). She said that saved her life. BUT, they didn't just force feed, they also taught proper nutrition and also had therapy sessions to help them have positive thoughts about food (i.e. the good feeling you have when you eat something particularly yummy, the delicious smells all around your house when you're making something in the crock pot, etc.). To this day, she says she is alive because of that treatment - not only the force feeding (because she refused to eat), but the therapy and nutrition classes as well (in fact, maybe more). The force feeding was the short term solution, but the therapy and classes were the long term solution.



I don't know if they still do that in treatment centers though...

Charlie - posted on 03/30/2011

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Ok but medical ethics say that a doctor has a responsibility to keep the patient alive to administer treatment. In the UK Diana Pretty was denied the right to die by the House of Lords even though she consistently request it. The Israeli Courts ordered the force- feeding of political hunger strikers arguing that in a conflict between life and dignity, life wins. India prosecuted a physician who allowed a hunger striker to die.

Also a healthier body weight is necessary to be able to treat the patient’s psychological problems. Studies in Minnesota show that when normal volunteers were starved, they began to development anorectic patterns. They over-estimated the sizes of their own faces by approximately 50%. This shows the impact of starvation on the brain.

Most countries recognise Anorexia as a mental illness ( some don't ) and I can see how it is undignified ( as said by the european convention of human rights ) , I also don't see it as a long term solution .

I am somewhat conflicted on this as I am all about " my body , my choice " but having said that the patient is not “capable of forming unimpaired and rational judgements concerning the consequences” as is said by the British Medical Association 1992 so free choice is hard to give when the patient lacks ability to think rationally or logically .

Carolyn - posted on 04/02/2011

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See the thing about mental illness is that all though a person may not be in their “right mind” it does not mean they are unable to make decision about their own treatment.



If a person can understand what the treatment is for and the consequences of denying it ad show insight into the whole thing, they have the right to refuse treatment.



Being anorexic does not make you incompetent. Being schizophrenic does not make you incompetent. ( I have met some amazingly brilliant schizophrenics, who even when experiencing symptoms of their illness, have an amazing understanding of what is going on, and are often gifted in intelligence) Being Depressed does not make you incompetent, nor does bipolar etc.

You cant just go around shoving feeding tubs in peoples noses and forcing medications down peoples throats because they are mentally ill.



Imagine you are diagnosed with depression. During this depression you are not in “the right state of mind” ( as many people keep referring too) , So does the doctor have a right to force pills down your throat because someday 4 months from now you could get worse and try to commit suicide ?



Not all anorexics will starve themselves to death. Many will eat just enough to keep themselves alive, so should we run around shoving tubes in their throats, violating their human rights, making them feel violated on an emotional level ?



From the Canadian Mental Health Act.

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Determining competence



27(2)In determining a patient's mental competence to make treatment decisions, the attending physician shall consider



(a)whether the patient understands

(i)the condition for which the treatment is proposed,

(ii)the nature and purpose of the treatment,

(iii)the risks and benefits involved in undergoing the treatment, and

(iv)the risks and benefits involved in not undergoing the treatment; and



(b)whether the patient's mental condition affects his or her ability to appreciate the consequences of making a treatment decision.



ADMINISTERING TREATMENT



No treatment without consent

29(1)Except as provided in this section, an attending physician shall not administer treatment to a patient



(a)who is mentally competent to make treatment decisions, without the patient's consent;



(b)who is not mentally competent to make treatment decisions, without the consent of a person authorized to make treatment decisions on the patient's behalf under subsection 28(1); or



(c)unless the review board or the court has made an order under subsection 30(3) or Part 7 authorizing the treatment to be given.



Exception for psychiatric treatment to prevent harm



29(2)Pending consent on a patient's behalf or an order of the review board or the court, psychiatric treatment may be given without consent to a patient in order to prevent harm to the patient or to another person.



Method of psychiatric treatment



29(3)Psychiatric treatment may be given under this section by the use of such force, mechanical means or medication as is reasonable having regard to the patient's physical and mental condition.

Detailed record of psychiatric treatment



29(4)Measures taken under subsection (2) to treat or restrain a patient without his or her consent must be recorded in detail in the patient's clinical record, and must include the following:



(a)where medication is used, an entry of the medication used that includes the dosage and the method and frequency of administration; and



(b)where force or mechanical means are used to restrain the patient, a statement that the patient was restrained that includes

(i)a description of the means of restraint,

(ii)a statement of the period of time during which the patient was or is expected to be restrained, and

(iii)a description of the behaviour that required the patient to be restrained or to continue to be restrained.



Emergency medical treatment



29(5)Emergency medical treatment may be given to a patient, without consent, if there is imminent and serious danger to the patient's life or to a limb or vital organ and the patient,



(a)in the opinion of a physician, is not mentally competent; or



(b)is otherwise unable to give consent.

----------------------------------------------------------

Note worthy: many times the Review Board's decisions have been overturned by courts as well, granting the right to refuse treatment.



I think the last bit is where Anorexia would fall into place : EMERGENCY !!!! Possible Coma, imminent death etc.



But to go shoving tubes in peoples throats without their health being in immediate danger and not giving them the opportunity to attempt therapy first, is a violation of human rights.

Erin - posted on 03/30/2011

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The use of an NG tube while a patient goes through intensive inpatient treatment and counselling seems acceptable to me. You can't overcome the mental illness if you're in a coma or dead. But it would require a doctor 'scheduling' a patient for this to happen without their consent (meaning they are legally recognised and medically diagnosed as being incapable of making decisions regarding their care).

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[deleted account]

I think that anorexia has a lot to do with control and feeling in control. I would think that with taking that control away by force feeding you would be making them worse. I don't think it should be done unless the person is life threateningly thin and it is absolutely necessary.

Micelle - posted on 08/08/2013

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I'm a mothers with a daughter with anorexia nervosa . She's had to have a feeding tube put in a few times ,she was at risk for heart failure .Were middle class. , It hard to hear your daughter saying kill me. Then taking ensure . People who call this mental illness a rich bitch illness doesn't know one thing about it . So if u care enough about it maybe you should do your research .

[deleted account]

So many mental illnesses and so little compassion and understanding in the world. Just shows we are not a perfect species by any standard.

Sarah - posted on 04/07/2011

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That's good news Jen thank you! :)
Yeah Amanda, i think it's about control for my best friend too! She actually doesnt mind her body and always shows it off in skimpy outfits. I think its a mix of self punishment and control. :(

Amanda - posted on 04/05/2011

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none of the anorexics i have known were the "rich bitch" type.... i think that has a lot to do with media portrayal of the disease. it's not always about poor body image either, in some cases it's about control. for my cousin, it was about control, her home life wasn't bad, but she had some underlying issues with her mother and some OCD as well that seemingly triggered the anorexia.
as far as "force feeding" via a feeding tube, i think it's necessary. from what i understand this is only done when it is immediately necessary to save the afflicted person. in my cousins case this saved her life at least 3 times that i know of and was only done when she was down to 75lbs or less (at 5'8") and in the beginning stages of heart failure. once her body had enough nutrients to support organ functions they would start psychological treatment and start with the nutrition counseling. it's a vicious cycle though, she would do well for awhile and then fall back into it. she seems good now, but i know it's a daily struggle for her

[deleted account]

She did. She made a full recovery but it took years and a move several states away from her family to do it. Now she looks amazing, is amazing. I admire her strength of character.

Sarah - posted on 04/05/2011

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Jen, it sounds like you were in the same boat i am in now. :(
How is your friend now? Did she recover?

Becky - posted on 04/05/2011

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If it's necessary to save their lives, then yes. But I certainly don't think it should be the first/primary course of treatment.

[deleted account]

It wasn't a rich bitch issue in 1990 when my best friend nearly died of heart failure twice. It was a issue of abuse that no one knew about so she simply stopped eating. Remind me not to leave kitten unattended by Sharon.

Sarah - posted on 04/03/2011

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oh no, ahhh sorry! When my emotions get involved my writing falls apart and i ramble on a bit and don't make much sense! haha my bad! :)

Carolyn - posted on 04/03/2011

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Gotchya Sarah. I guess the way I read it seemed like you missed what i said and were arguing a point i already made LOL. :)

Sarah - posted on 04/03/2011

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yeah no shit Kathy!
Fuck guys! Now i am angry! My best friend is certainly NOT a rich bitch and is NOT on welfare either! She is a beautiful teenage girl with a full time job! She is doing okay for herself. She is far from rich but she is also not in need of welfare! How cruel are you people to be making judgments and stereotyping these people! If you knew ANYTHING about Anorexia you would know there is no generalizing! Every single one is different! The only trend i have seen is that they are all beautiful people. Inside or out, they are lovely. My best friend is actually one of the best, kindest, most loving, caring, funny, talented and beautiful people i have ever met! How dare you place cruel judgments on her and those like her!

@Carolyn, i wasn't disagreeing with you, i was just adding that in my opinion, anorexia more than often makes then incompetent. I don't think they are all incompetent, i don't think they can be grouped one way or another, or if 1 type of treatment works for one it will work for them all. I agree with you that ever person is different and they all need individual assessment and treatment. And yes organ failure would be classified as an emergency (i hope)

Sharon - posted on 04/03/2011

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I've only met rich bitch anorexics. Maybe its the circles I ran in. I've also never read of some kid from a family that drives a car 20 years old with anorexia. Its always the parent sitting in front of the baby grand talking about their kids sports club, ballet lessons blah blah blah - not exactly welfare.

and yeah poor people tend to have self esteem issues. wouldn't you? wearing welfare shit all the time?

I do have contempt. A lot of it. self absorbed little shits get what they get.

[deleted account]

Poor people can have poor self image or control issues too....i knew a few anorexic teens from poor families...

[deleted account]

Massive generalisation - I've known many people with anorexia nervosa, and it hits those through a range of socio-economic groups!
And it's a mental condition, Sharon - have you no comprehension of that? Your contempt is insulting to those who have this tragic condition, and their families!

Sharon - posted on 04/03/2011

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Its funny that you never hear of someone on welfare being anorexic. its a rich bitch issue.

yes by all means, force feed the idiot at the expense of the family who wants to save them. and they pick up the tab for the organ damage too.

Carolyn - posted on 04/03/2011

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Sarah I agree that there are instinces where force feeding may be necessary : as a i mentioned, in emergency life and death situations, but imminent ones.

I would constitue organ failure an emergency wouldnt you ?

IM wondering if you read my entire post, because I have agreed that it should be used as a life saving measure when the person is on deaths door.

I dont agree with running around shoving tubes down anorexics throats because mom and dad think they are too thin, and they are not in going to die within the next week.

In your friends case, if she doesnt beleive the consquences of her treatment refusal, then i would agree, and by the criteria above, she could be proven incompetent.

But your one friend does not represent the masses. And Every person needs to be evaluated individually and not a blanket policy across all anorexics.

Sarah - posted on 04/03/2011

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@ Carolyn's post.
My boyfriend is schizophrenic, my MIL is bipolar and my mum has depression and i have had depression.
The only person i would say is mentally incompetent is my anorexic best friend,
Although it all made sense to her logically, and she understands what the doctors say, she doesn't believe it, or think it matters, or something! Anorexia is such a vicious disease i think SOMETIMES it needs to be fort with force feeding. If they are going to die or are suffering permanent organ damage then it is important for them to be nourished. There is no right answer for everyone when it comes to force feeding, but saving their lives is the most important thing.
Continuous force feeding is usually counter productive, but as a last resort it can be helpful :)

[deleted account]

I've had 2 acquaintances (friends of my daughters when they were teenagers) go through anorexia. One of them reached the stage where she was going to die if she was not fed. So forced feeding it had to be. Not pretty, but absolutely necessary. She could not have participated in therapies etc designed to help her mental condition if she was dead.Tshanna,it was not a matter of forcing her to do anything - she was dying of starvation. When a person is dying of starvation, it is NOT POSSIBLE to "help them realize what they are doing to their bodies and why."

The other girl didn't reach that stage. Forced feeding would have been counterproductive for her.

So it's not something you can generalise about.

Tshanna Ele - posted on 04/02/2011

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Absolutely not. Forcing anyone to do anything does not help them, but makes the problem worse. Having recovered from anorexia nervosa, the only way to treat it, is to help the person realize what they are doing to their bodies and why. If you force a person with depression to take mood stabilizers, does it help?

Carolyn - posted on 04/02/2011

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Also you cant just have someone declare imcompetent, You need to prove to a panel that a person is incompetent.

It really isnt as easy as many people seem to think it is. And it is difficult for a reason, rights have been abused, people have been abused and lives destroyed because of willy nilly treatment decisions that can do more harm then good, because someone else thought they knew what was best.

Sarah - posted on 04/02/2011

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I'm crying now :(
My best friend in the world was diagnosed with anorexia 2 years or so ago.
As far as force feeding goes, i really don't know.
I think the tube is a good idea.
Any hospital treatment involves force feeding! A very strict, hospital controlled diet is inevitable for the patients and i have no doubt in my mind that makes the girls worse. I have seen what they do to avoid eating it.. they smear cheese and butter over their skin, put bits of bread in their hair.. anything! They are watched in the toilet to make sure they don't throw up! It is disgusting how they are treated! I think my friend would feel better being fed through a tube because she would still be able to control what goes into her mouth.
Changing the mindset is the number one thing for these people. Finding the core of the problem.
I will never understand why such a beautiful girl would do this. She is seriously amazing! One of those people who are the best at everything without even trying, the one all the boys want :) lol
Anyway the anorexia is not our biggest concern with her now.
I think if from the very start of the eating disorder it was dealt with in the right way she would be fine now. The only problem is i don't know what that right way is.

When she was in hospital she would gain like 3 kilos a week probably, then they would let her out because she 'weighed enough' and no doubt, a month later she would be worse than she started and back in hospital! They kept her in for a week on average and the longest she stayed was about 3 weeks. How is that long enough to overcome an illness?!!!! All they did was feed her and she saw a psych a few times! She was so much sicker mentally in hospital and shortly after.
I think treatment for anorexics should be like a group home where they learn about their body and nutrition, and yes they have to eat but not 6 huge meals a day! Tube feed if necessary, that's fine, but don't routinely force huge amounts of food into them!
If treatment centres were nicer, like they could go outside and socialize and have visitors and go out on weekends and do schooling and activites in there and it was a long term thing, it would work a lot better than how my best friend was 'treated.'
She was literally confined to her bed! She wasn't allowed to walk more than a foot to her wheelchair , then she was wheeled to the toilet or to the meals room! She wasn't allowed her phone or to talk to the other patients. Every time i went to see her, she just cried on my shoulder the whole time. Talk about hell for her!

Rosie - posted on 03/31/2011

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if the persons life is at risk, then yes i think they should be forced. simply forcing someone to eat without proper therapy will do no good though, so obviously i think they should go hand in hand.

[deleted account]

Yes of course.Many girls or even boys etc have been taken in to hospital dangerously under weight or close to death.This method of feeding them has saved there lives.I have watched many tv programmes on this.As my sister has went through it, well it was bulimia.Thankfully she never got very bad and happy to say she got better.



The programmes i watched were heartbreaking..some died and many got better.They will forever be in recovery& need professional help.The main thing is there alive.There force fed in hospital until they reach a save weight.

Then they need help from there.The main thing is to get them help and get them to be able to slowly put food in there mouth.It will lead to them making there own food and consuming it.I watched a group of women get to that point and it was amazing compared to how they used to be.

They were all forced fed at a number of times before they got help and over came it to a certain degree.They will always be in recovery.



They control has to be taken away from them when there close to death because of stravation.I wouldn't think twice if it were my children.If i could put the tube in myself i would.

Jenn - posted on 03/31/2011

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Julianne - how could someone who is suffering from Anorexia be considered competent enough to make the decision that they don't need to be force fed? Clearly they are NOT in a right state of mind. I think it's OK to do if it is needed to keep them alive and it is used in conjunction with treatment (therapy, education etc.). I went to school with a girl who had anorexia nervosa and she had to be hospitalized - she was so small that her body grew peach fuzz-like hair to protect itself. :(

April - posted on 03/31/2011

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Anorexia is all about control. Those with anorexia are usually perfectionists, usually have someone in their lives that they perceive as controlling them. That is why I believe force feeding of any kind would make the condition worse. I possibly agree with it as a last ditch effort if the patient is comatose or quickly approaching that state...possibly. I just say that because if it were MY child, I'd want every effort done to save her/him. If it were ME, I'd feel controlled all over again and probably would continue anorexic behaviors.

Katherine - posted on 03/31/2011

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I agree with Kelly. I think a doctor should actually be an addictionologist. SO many doctors aren't versed in treating addiction. They just blanket it and the real problem never gets solved. They need intensive therapy, not just good nutrition habits.
They need to learn how to deal with their illness on a level that helps them realize they have a distorted way of thinking about their body.
So in that regard, I think they SHOULD be force fed along with all of these other things.

[deleted account]

Unfortunately, I know it is necessary for some, and while it will help some, it will hinder others in recovery. I think any doctor medically treating an anorexic patient should be well educated in the mental treatment as well and willing to work with the psychologists and therapists also treating the patient.



For some, the feeding tube is helpful--it allows them to get the nutrients they need without having to go though the pain of eating.

For others, it can take away the only source of control they have, and that will hinder their recovery.



Anorexia is not always about body image, and due to that perception, people often don't get the kind of treatment they need. Anorexia can stem from many issues, not just body image.



Edited because I had second thoughts about sharing all that. My apologies to those who took the time to read it.

Karla - posted on 03/31/2011

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I look at it this way, if a person is schizophrenic and they stop taking their meds, and are out of control/at risk of injuring themselves....I think most of us would agree it is OK to give them medication against their will in order to get their behavior under control enough to receive therapy and other forms of treatment.

Alyssa - posted on 03/31/2011

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Every patient who has Anorexia has a from of mental incapacity...otherwise they wouldn't be in the situation. So, yes! I do agree that if necessary they should be "force fed" with a NG tube if thats what the doctors determine is necessary and they are at risk of dying. After this there should of course be rehabilitation and counselling but often I hear there isn't enough. Once the patient puts on enought weight they are off again.....only to return and complete the cycle again.

Sneaky - posted on 03/31/2011

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If my daughter was starving herself to death because she had the unrealistic thought that she was fat, then yes I 100% agree with force feeding - and I would have her declared mentally incompetent so I could agree to it on her behalf if necessary. That I would classify as treatment for starvation and possible dehydration. Once that was underway, I would expect treatment for the anorexia problem to begin, and I do see them as two medically different treatments.

Mel - posted on 03/30/2011

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if its risking their health risking their death I would think that unfortunately the nasal gastric tubes would be the only option

Mrs. - posted on 03/30/2011

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I agree that if it is a crisis and the patient would expire if it was not done, it's okay.

I was never that bad that I required hospitalization just out patient therapy. Still, I do believe that places that just pump those full of food, who may not be at death's door yet and don't educate/treat the pain behind the illness, those places don't really work that well. It is an illness that has to do with control. You have to learn to let go not be forced to let go. It tends not to work that way.

It's a bit like alcoholism in the way that you can get a drunk dry but if you do nothing else, the minute that drunk leaves you - they'll be heading to the bar.

[deleted account]

Every case is different. A psychological assessment should be done before the decision to force feed or not. If the patient is for the most part mentally stable and capable of making the decision to deny treatment, that is their right. We can't force people to get better, you can only treat the willing for the most part.
For one person the benefit of force feeding would outweigh the negative impact it would have psychological effect it would have on them. Others vice versa. Each case would need to be carefully analyzed to make sure its best for that particular person. If they are in the proper mental/physical and emotional state to deny or have the treatment forced on them.

Carolyn - posted on 03/30/2011

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As a person who works with the severely mentally ill, it is a very hard line to determine.

I have witnessed , regularly , completely delusional individuals exercise their right to refuse medication and treatments and there isnt a damned thing you can do about it in most situations. And these people are far from capable of forming unimparied and rational judgments concerning the consequences of refusing treatment/meds.

So cherry picking which mental illness have the right to exercise their rights as a patient and human being is a slippery slope.

Many people need to make a direct and immediate attempt on their life before treatments can be forced, or present an immediate danger to others. Having said this, I appreciate that most severe cases of anorexia are a form of slow suicide, but so are the choices of many of the severely mentally ill who would rather abuse substances ( including rubbing alcohol and mouthwash since most often they cant afford the stuff at the liquor store) refuse medical and psychiatric services, live on the streets, play in traffic ( seen it on many occasions) and so forth than comply with a medication regime to deal with their symptoms and increase the odds of their survival.

Jenny - posted on 03/30/2011

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Ooohh, good question. I honestly don't know how I feel about this one. I'm on the fence. I'll have to give it some thought.

Charlie - posted on 03/30/2011

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Ok but what about " :
the patient is not “capable of forming unimpaired and rational judgements concerning the consequences” as is said by the British Medical Association 1992
would you say they still had the right to deny treatment if they are not mentally capable of making the decision .

[deleted account]

If the patient was in a crisis situation. Then it would be necessary to sustain life. Most people who are starving go into a coma before dying. If the patient was lucid and was denying treatment. Sadly that is their right and they can do so if they please. Plus like i already stated, it would be detrimental to the emotional well being of the patient, so it wouldn't be helping their condition.

Stifler's - posted on 03/30/2011

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if it's with a nasogastric tube i'm all for it. i agree, they do need sustenance to help their state of mind.

Carolyn - posted on 03/30/2011

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I can agree that it may be necessary to keep a person alive in order to receive treatment, and how informed consent goes out the window when a person is not psycholigically capable of doing that due to severe mental illness.



But i do think it can be counter productive to the end goal for some. For many anorexics, the disease is in large part about control. When everything else in their world is out of their controle and chaotic ( or feels that way to them) one of the few things they can control is their food consumption.



So force feeding ( by any avenue) that individual could result in a more severe downward spiral once that person is given right over their food consumption again and could very well eliminate any chances of a good prognosis for recovery, and permantly damage any therapeutic relationship, now and later. It could very well contribute to their death in the longterm.



I think instead of force feeding people ( who arent laying unconscious in a hospital bed dying), treatment needs to be made more affordable and readily available to those who need it.

Charlie - posted on 03/30/2011

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"Force-feeding means inserting a feeding tube through the nose or mouth into a person's esophagus to give them nutrients and, generally against their will at first (hence "force"), prevent starvation and enable them to regain lost weight."

[deleted account]

Would a feeding tube or IV be considered force feeding? Because if the case was that sever, i think these would be an acceptable alternative to actually forcing the patient to eat the food. The psychological aspect of physically eating the food is not there. So it would help by providing nutrition and giving the patient time to recover from the illness.

Stifler's - posted on 03/30/2011

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Force feeding as in nil by mouth feeding or shoving food down their throat?

Katherine - posted on 03/30/2011

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Statistics on anorexia are not favorable as far as treatment goes. Only about 1 in 10 people with eating disorders receive treatment. Remember, anorexia statistics show that 20% of people with anorexia who do not get treatment will die. About 80% of those who do get treatment don’t get enough of it; they receive some impatient care, but are sent home before the recommended length of stay is up. There may be several reasons for this. They may leave against medical advice because they don’t think they need the treatment, or their health insurance coverage may refuse to pay for further treatment. Anorexia statistics show that inpatient treatment costs an average of $1000 per day, and the recommended length of stay is usually three to six months.
So as Loureen stated, they do not think they have a problem. Look at the stats.

Katherine - posted on 03/30/2011

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Well if it's a matter of life and death I think it should be done. The question is though, is it medically ethical? If they can't mentally and rationally think for themselves I believe it to be necessary. I mean we are talking about young woman here, woman who have lives ahead of them, maybe families........
Human rights should have no say for crying out loud most anorexic woman are, at the age of onset, 17. http://www.mirror-mirror.org/anorexia-st... Some are older, in their 40's. So this information is saying that if the patient doesn't consent then they can just let them die?

[deleted account]

No. i think the doctors should enforce good eating habits and positive thoughts about food. If they are force feeding these people, it would inadvertently impact the relationship with the food negatively.

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