Homeschooling/Unschooling

Mother - posted on 02/28/2012 ( 283 moms have responded )

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We've been homeschooling for about 4 years now. We love it. Does anyone else do this?? What are your opinions of unschooling?? Do any of you unschool??

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Karla - posted on 02/29/2012

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Oh, I should mention, my kids were glad to have both the homeschool and public school experience. There is some learning about life that is hard to achieve with home schooling. I wouldn't call it socializing, but it does have to do with understanding the whole society. School is a place where you are with all socio-economic classes, and it can be helpful in understanding society and the world to be immersed in that environment.

Isobel - posted on 02/28/2012

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I agree with Krista, while it is wonderful to teach kids without using "tests" the fact of the matter is that your children may want to enter the school system at any time and I think it's important to prepare them for that possibility.



Letting your child get to 18 years old without learning how to properly organize an essay or write a multiple choice test or to do higher math IS doing them a disservice. It is severely limiting their options for their future and that IMHO is just wrong.

Krista - posted on 02/28/2012

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I have no problem with homeschooling as long as the parent is conscientious in ensuring that the child is prepared for higher education/the workforce, and as long as the parent ensures that the child receives lots of opportunities to socialize with other children.



There are some exemplary homeschoolers out there, who do their research, know their child's learning style, and work hard to bring out the best in their child and foster a love of learning.



And there are some craptacular homeschoolers out there who are ill-prepared and who homeschool solely because they want to shelter their children from any outside influences, and who put no thought into whether or not their schooling will be enough to prepare their child for college.



Would I homeschool? No. I already have a job, thank you. I do, however, plan on closely monitoring what my child is learning at public school and will supplement his learning with at-home lessons, if needed. Our public school is a good one, but I am not going to just blindly trust that they will teach my son everything he needs to know.

Kate CP - posted on 03/04/2012

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"So, Kate, if that's true, if the system is f'd and great education is the exception...and this is with people who spend a great deal of time learning how to teach in teaching school....is the better alternative for one parent, who might not even have any inclination to teach, to give up their career and homeschool their child?



I can see how that works if one parent enjoys teaching and is good at it, but what about the other ones who are much better at providing for their family outside of the home?



It seems the system might be broken, but the question is, what is the best way to make do with what we have?



Now each child might thrive in different situations, but each family does not always have the resources to get their child in that position.



If the system is broken, it is going to take a LONG time to fix it. What then is the best situation for the kids who are not able to be taught at home? "



I don't think a parent should have to make the choice of their career or their child's education. And I don't think any parent should feel forced into public schooling or home schooling. I'm not advocating for or against home schooling: I'm advocating for a better education system.



The system IS broken and the only way to fix it is to kick politicians out of it. ALL schools should get the same amount of funding for TEACHERS and NOT office personnel. We don't need three vice principals in one school. We don't need eight administrative assistants in one school. We don't need 35 kids in one class.



We need teachers! MORE TEACHERS! And smaller class sizes: 20-25 kids per class. We need more materials in the class rooms and less paper work. More hands on, class participation and less home work. More mastery of skills and concepts and less tests.



Homeschooling isn't the answer. Private schools aren't the answer. Public schools sure as shit ain't the answer...the answer is to fix the problem.

Jodi - posted on 03/02/2012

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"I don't want them spending so much time being raised by various teachers that I don't know well."



Actually, I take offence to this comment. Believe it or not, people who send their children to school are still raising their children. The teachers are NOT raising our children. If you think this, then you have the wrong concept of what school is AND the wrong concept of parenting.

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Ty - posted on 04/21/2013

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I am homeschooling temporarily...honestly I am not too fond of it. In the fall she will be attending our neighborhood school.

t

Debbie - posted on 04/19/2013

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I think it is getting to the point where we really do have to think about how our children are educated and all the "social agendas" that are being taught as well. Parents and children are bombarded with lots of issues. I have associated with many homeschool parents and children and many get their families involved with good learning experiences and wholesome entertainment. Often, it is more about being able to have a Christian element added to the teachings that make a difference. Many successful college students have been homeschooled. There is a helpful website for some tips and techniques that help distinguish the "parent / teacher" element with this unique situation. There are also so free printable ideas as well. Good work bucks can be earned for school work. The web site is: http://parentinghomeschool.com. There is also a list of homeschool fairs and conventions around the country. Good luck

Nanette - posted on 10/01/2012

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For the parents who actually homeschool I commend you for your efforts. It takes so much more work than putting your kids on the bus and hoping for the best. I think we all know there are parents who "homeschool" and don't work at it and their children go without an education. Just like there are school systems that are failing and some students get over looked.



I feel strongly that they are your children and you need to do whatever you think is best for them.



My son is best served by the social interaction and dynamics of a classroom. I stay abreast of all of his work at school and I supplement his education at home. I think he gets the best of both worlds.



Good luck to all of you!

Candyce - posted on 10/01/2012

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I was homeschooled from 3rd to 12th grade and loved it! I'm now in the 3rd year of homeschooling my son and I'm continually amazed at how quickly he grasps new concepts and how enthusiastic he is about doing his schoolwork. We're very loosely structured and I build my own curriculum and it's perfect for us.

Sandra - posted on 09/27/2012

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I home schooled my children for several years. I like a lot of people knew nothing about it and I had a lot of misconceptions about home schooling. I started out of necessity. My son's second grade teacher told me that there was nothing she could do with him academically. I was battling with the school over testing/services for dyslexia at that time. Every time it looked like we were making progress they would throw up a road block and we'd be back at square one.



It was past the deadline for home schooling through the school system so we had to sign up through an umbrella school. We signed up with a Christian school. It was a wonderful experience. I only home schooled him the first year.



We were referred to a support organization in our area. This organization provided information and support about home schooling. They had a very large very organized co-op that held a "school" on Fridays. They offered basic courses, foreign languages, drama, band, physical education, home ec, robotics, biology, chemistry, economics etc. The children/parents could choose their classes each semester. The co op also had recreation time on Friday afternoons. On other days of the week there were field trips at least once a month and weekly outings. There were plays and shows. Award ceremonies. Prom and graduation celebrations. The average age here for home school graduation? 16. Then they usually attend classes at the community college until they are of age.



My children didn't miss out on anything when they were home schooling. They loved it. They had lots of friends between the co op. church, scouts, and all of the sports that they participated in they were never isolated or unsocialized.



Unschool is a misunderstood term too. I'm sure it means different things to different people. Over the years, I realized there were two types of home schooling parents. Those who have a very precise schedule that they follow every day and those that follow a freer more natural schedule. The second set is what I would consider unschoolers. That was me. Why insist that the children get up and dressed and sitting at the table by 8 o'clock every day?



All of the children got their mandated four hours a day five days a week. Did it matter if it was at 8 o'clock, noon, or in the evening? No, it didn't. I had a curriculum and text books but I always took advantage of impromptu learning experiences.



I have been a pre k teacher for over twenty years. I will be the first to tell you that children do not learn the best by sitting at a desk or table all day and listening to someone talk. Why just read about history when you can also go out and see it even touch it? Same with science and other subjects too. I returned my children to school when I got divorced and needed to work full time. They were all at grade level or higher in every subject except my son with dyslexia and he had made many gains while home schooling.



School use to be fun. Now all of the joy of learning is being sucked out of our children. Now it is all about test scores. Teachers teach to the test nowadays not to the students. They are even taking recess away from the children here. My youngest son is in kindergarten. He's been in school for 7 weeks. They have played on the playground three times so far this year.



I sent my little one to school this year. I am a single parent so I have to work. I'm not teaching this year. I am working on starting my own business and tutoring. I already make more than I did teaching (sad). Once I get it my income where it needs to be and get my hours down to just a few a week I will home school again. Or unschool whichever you want to call it.

MaryAnne - posted on 09/19/2012

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We have been homeschooling for 4 years too! And I love it! However, I feel like the "unschool" is just another way for public schools to make a bad name for homeschool. I understand the reason for uschool, it's mostly to "deprogram" our children from the conformity of public schools. Sure - I get that, but then people just say that we do nothing all day. Which is so far from the truth!



I like the term homeschool because that's what it is. it's school at home. Unschool is just what it sounds like....no school. And I feel iike that's what other people associate homeschool with. Even if kids have to work when they grow up, they still have a 9 to 5 job that they will have to do. I feel like homeschool preps them for that. How ever long it is, but it's structured and focus time. The term "unschool" just seems to convery "do whatever you'd like". Which may send a message to your child to do exactly that.



I support people trying to find what their kid is interested in, and nurture that gift so that they can make a living or be open minded. Totally fine. However, I still feel that children need basic curriculum to guide them too.

Sally - posted on 09/18/2012

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Molly, you don't find a homeschool; you become one. The first step is to find out the laws in your state. It's legal everywhere, but some places make it easy and some make it hard. I'm lucky enough to live in one of the easy states. Then find out what your state expects your child to learn and whether or not you have to take any of the standardized tests. One of the fastest ways to do this is to put your state and "homeschool laws" into your favorite search engine to get the appropriate law #'s; then follow up at the closest law library. Most colleges have one and some are very helpful. Do not ask your local school. While some are homeschool friendly, very few know the laws and many will see you as "stealing" their government per-student stipend.

If you think you'll need help, go back to your favorite search engine and look for homeschool groups or co-ops in your town. Unless you know for sure you agree with their tenets, avoid the ones that push only one learning style or only one religion or expect a membership fee before they talk to you. If there aren't any actual flesh and blood groups in your area, look on Yahoo or Facebook. Most states and many localities have multiple groups. I personally belong to 2 groups that have real life meetings, Yahoo groups and Facebook pages and 2 more groups that are just on Yahoo. 3 are local and one is state wide. The 3 local are eclectic and the state wide is only unschooling.

Then you and your child get to start learning. If you'd prefer a more unschooling approach but your state biases the laws toward school at home, there are companies that will help you turn what your child did today into a lesson plan for a fee. There are Yahoo and Facebook groups where experienced parents will show you how to do it yourself for free. Also most states that require testing will let you have a certified teacher evaluate your child's "work portfolio" instead. Some of those teachers are much more home- an/or un- school friendly than others. The local homeschool groups can help you find one who will help instead of hinder you. Even if your state demands tests, don't get stressed about it. A real world education will be much more valuable in the real world than the ability to regurgitate a Scantron sheet.

Good luck and have fun

Molly - posted on 09/17/2012

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I'm looking for a homeschool for my preschooler! My niece had a bad experience in regular school and I don't want my daughter to go through that. How are you making it work?

Merry - posted on 08/21/2012

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Yes! We will be home/unschooling. I want my kids to really truely learn and love learning and learn how to learn more in the real world. I don't think traditional schools do this. so I will do what I see is best!

Sherri - posted on 08/19/2012

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Nope no thank you I will be opting for a proper school. That is what is best for my children.

Sally - posted on 08/18/2012

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Unschooling is wonderful. It's the way most of humanity learned for most of history and it's still the way most people learn fastest and easiest. I wish every child could do it.

Tracey - posted on 08/16/2012

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So, Maddy, in real life, do you get to pick what magazine articles you read? Did someone tell you "We've enrolled you in square dancing! Enjoy! Or else." It's very much the old "you can lead a horse to water" problem.

The key to child-led learning is making the horse thirsty. And a thirsty horse will put away way more gallons of water than one who isn't.

You make your child thirsty for knowledge by making choices: do you fill your house with video games, mindless kid videos, and always go to amusement parks on vacation? Or do you need more wall for your bookshelves, buy PBS series, kick them outside to play and explore, read to them constantly from the time they're newborns (and before), and stop at every historical marker and museum you can find, even if you're headed to the amusement park this vacation anyhow?

Let's say you're doing these things. Your 7-year-old sees a National Geographic article on coral reefs, and at your next vacation, part of the trip is a trip to SeaWorld or Shedd Aquarium (Chicago) or Newport Aquarium (Cincinnati). He's fascinated with corals at this point, and you buy him a book at the museum store.

So he goes home, and, using the internet links in the book, spends hours researching corals and various reefs. In the process, he learns about ocean currents and how pollution and other factors are affecting the corals around the world. So then he starts researching pollution, learning a bit of basic chemistry along the way.

Let's say he retains this interest, and by the time he's 14, starts volunteering at the nearest zoo, taking care of their tropical fish and corals exhibits. He uses more chemistry, more math, and more biology to do this, as well as learning a lot about geography and even world conditions and trade and export/import laws as he learns about how some of the fish and corals were acquired.

This is what child-led learning looks like. Was this not real learning because it was not dripped into him by another person, whether he liked it or not? Did he learn anything about related areas along the way? Would it be better and more "official" if he read a couple of paragraphs about corals in a textbook at the age of 7 and then had a quiz that asked one question about it and moved on to another topic?

Child-led learning, done right, requires an adult facilitator, who functions more like a guide and less like a Dripmaster. The adult (the parent in homeschooling, usually, but sometimes good family friends can act as mentors) is there paying attention to what the child is doing, even if it doesn't look like it. They're there to notice the interest and possibly go find something related to just leave around where the child might find it. They're there to drive the child to the library or bookstore, or find just the right video, or arrange the field trip.

What it doesn't mean: letting your kids run wild while you catch up on your soaps. It does not mean that at all *to those who are actively doing it*.

Maddy - posted on 08/16/2012

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Child Led learning? Really? What else do they lead? the household? guessing they sort of parent themselves? Thatll go over real well in the real world..uy vey

Patricia - posted on 08/14/2012

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I am new here with a 10 yr old Daughter. We are what you would consider unschoolers. We love it and can't imagine living our lives any other way. She is a self learner so for us it has worked out well.

Nanaspez - posted on 06/18/2012

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I am homeschooling my 9 year old grandson due to the lack of support from the school he was enrolled in. I started homeschooling him since 3rd grade. Last year was a real challenge mainly because of his behavior. We spent the majority of last year just trying to figure out behavior issues and by the time one of his parents would pick him up I would be physically and emotionally drained! Our school district does have classes twice a week and field trips for the kids enrolled in home school. He also goes to a after school program at the local elementary school. Around April something clicked and he is doing so much better. We (teacher at school) decided to put him in some advanced classes next year so that way he won't be as bored. I feel that he has blossomed so much since he has been home schooled. Being in school and being targeted by kids and school staff, whether it is in the classroom, playground or cafeteria was not a good enviroment for him. His self esteem has blossomed and he is a much happier child. He will be a 5th grader next year.

Jenni - posted on 03/04/2012

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It appears this topic has been discussed thoroughly so on that note let's lock up this thread. Feel free to start a new topic if you wish to discuss a related topic.



DM Moderator,



Jenni =^;^=

Tracey - posted on 03/04/2012

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"I can see how that works if one parent enjoys teaching and is good at it, but what about the other ones who are much better at providing for their family outside of the home? "



I've seen such a variety of answers to this and ways people have made homeschooling work. I'm just posting this to give ideas to anyone who might be reading it, wistfully thinking "I wish I could but..."



When the parent is single or both parents work, kids go to the homes of homeschooling friends during the day and get homeschooled along with the friends. This means they often get involved with the same activities and clubs as the friends do--a tradeoff, because they might really want ballet and they're getting baseball, but it's better than getting nothing.



Or they go to Grandma's or Aunt's house, and Grandma or Aunt takes them to any activities they're in, as well as overseeing school. School might be online (there are many free classes that have won awards; OpenCourseware includes classes from places like Harvard, Yale and M.I.T. and it's FREE--lecture videos, syllabus, class notes, tests (you have to grade them)--everything!). School might use something like one of the free curricula online that uses books that are in many libraries or free online.



I once helped the nanny of a very wealthy guy put together a homeschooling plan for his son, who had struggled in a variety of pricey private schools. It was a learning disability that turned into behavior problems by the time he was in jr. high; he just wasn't understanding things and he was getting frustrated and felt the need to act defensively macho. His dad didn't like what he was seeing. They ended up hiring a tutor to use the curriculum I'd found for them, and put him in some sports and clubs.



Another family has parents who work two different shifts. Dad takes some subjects while he's home; Mom takes the other half when she's home. A friend picks up the kids for activities and clubs, or one of the parents will drop the kid/s off on the way to work and the friend brings them home.



Yet other families have parents working the same shifts, but Grandma doesn't feel up to "doing school" with the kids and doesn't have the Internet. So she drives the kids to activities and clubs and sports while the parents are at work, and sometimes the kids have assignments to do while they're at her house. But school happens at night, after supper (they all eat with Grandma in at least one case.



Sometimes it takes a village to homeschool.

Mother - posted on 03/04/2012

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Absolutely Laura. I completely agree. The curriculum's available are amazing [if you use one]. Many times I've found myself nodding in agreement when 're-learning' something.

Jenni - posted on 03/04/2012

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Marina, I can honestly say if I didn't have much option in schools or the schools in my area were poor. I would definitely put homeschooling up there in my option's list. Or at least a combination.

Merry - posted on 03/04/2012

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And I don't know why people think you have to be some genius to homeschool!

You just have to have the time and effort and drive to do so and there's many tools you can use to teach your kids.

You do not have to be a teacher, or a top honors grad or anything.

You have to do the work to teach them, and you can learn alongside them if need be. Use a local homeschool group. Find a friend who knows math well to help out, use your resources and many states allow homeschooled kids to take up to 2 classes per semester in a public school so utilyzing that can eliminate issues too.

Many kids can self teach and older siblings can help younger ones.

Merry - posted on 03/04/2012

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So little miss are you saying public schools are better then nothing?

Cuz I agree.

But I feel Montessori, some private, homeschooling, tc can be better then your average public school.

Not that public is worse then nothing cuz that's obviously wrong.

But for those with a choice, homeschooling is a valid choice.

Mother - posted on 03/04/2012

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Au Contraire, I used the exact same words the previous poster did, just in reverse. And what you're referring to wasn't part of the equation when I posted my comment. That was a 'specific' spin you put on things AFTER my post.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 03/04/2012

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Your words would not be so judgemtal if you did Mother. And no Jenni, you do not have that option where I live. you have the option of paying for private school, public, or trying to get into a charter school.

Jenni - posted on 03/04/2012

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Marina, I live in a low income neighbourhood. And like I said, you have the option to bus your children to other schools.



ETA: Overall report cards based on all those factors.

Mother - posted on 03/04/2012

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"Is totally uncalled for and is totally rude. You do not understand peoples situations and to make a blanket statement like that shows how think your blinders are."

--*chuckling* not only have we covered this already but my statement was no more judgmental or rude then the one I countered.

Mother - posted on 03/04/2012

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"Not making assumptions Mother"

--I was actually referring to this statement. "It is quite obvious you are not familiar with the true meaning of poverty." You don't know a thing about me or the life I've lived. So, stating such a thing is an assumption on your part.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 03/04/2012

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Not making assumptions Mother, I know many parents at my sons school in almost that exact situation, or very similair. It is quite obvious you truly do not understand poverty stricken. If you saw the area that I am talking about, you would see what it is. And those students that are lucky enough to have this charter school, would not be in it if it did not exist. This is its first year. Other wise they would be attending the public school, like many students in that situation are. So your harsh judgmental statement of "Some 'public schooled' kids may need to be home schooled or have one on one and the parents are too lazy or selfish to see that......let alone provide it." Is totally uncalled for and is totally rude. You do not understand peoples situations and to make a blanket statement like that shows how think your blinders are.

Mother - posted on 03/04/2012

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"And how is that? Are you going to walk in and tell the teachers how to better teach their students? I don't think so."

--This statement makes zero sense.

Mother - posted on 03/04/2012

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"How can a mom who needs to work full time at the local laundry mat making minimum wage without the father, with 3 children not only homeschool, but also work full time to support her children? How is that in the best interest of the child? I think getting food on the table, and clothes on their backs, and a roof over their heads might trump homeschooling. It is quite obvious you are not familiar with the true meaning of poverty."

--don't make assumptions about people. We all know what that does.



No where in this thread did anyone post specifics until just now. I think we can all agree that every situation is different and some people's situations totally suck.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 03/04/2012

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"The alternatives don't mean the parent has to homeschool. The alternatives mentioned are actually done by teachers. "



And how is that? Are you going to walk in and tell the teachers how to better teach their students? I don't think so.

Mother - posted on 03/04/2012

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"Many people in this area do not HAVE computers or a way to access the web. Get it?"

--if this is the case, there are programs that make it so kids can go to a school or a library to access the webcast classes...problem solved.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 03/04/2012

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How can a mom who needs to work full time at the local laundry mat making minimum wage without the father, with 3 children not only homeschool, but also work full time to support her children? How is that in the best interest of the child? I think getting food on the table, and clothes on their backs, and a roof over their heads might trump homeschooling. It is quite obvious you are not familiar with the true meaning of poverty.

Mother - posted on 03/04/2012

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The alternatives don't mean the parent has to homeschool. The alternatives mentioned are actually done by teachers.



"There was a Catholic school with and 8.5/10 report card, a public school with a 4.0, a French Catholic school with a 9.0, and the one we chose a french immersion with a 8.0."

--what are these numbers?? Grade averages? Test scores??

Mother - posted on 03/04/2012

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Well, while this might be a true fact Little Miss, I thought we were talking about 'the best interest of the child'.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 03/04/2012

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Jenni, living in a poverty stricken area, there are not as many options like what you stated.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 03/04/2012

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Some people have no interest in homeschooling, and should not be forced to. Some are not qualified, and don't have the finances to do it. Public schools are a better option for many people Where there is no will, or want, there is no way.



Edited to add** "-- there are alternatives. There is virtual learning. There is webcast learning. There is tutoring systems[that costs money]. Where there is a will...there is a way"



Many people in this area do not HAVE computers or a way to access the web. Get it?

Jenni - posted on 03/04/2012

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I can only speak about my area... but we had a lot of choice in the school we chose for Ben. There was a Catholic school with and 8.5/10 report card, a public school with a 4.0, a French Catholic school with a 9.0, and the one we chose a french immersion with a 8.0. I'm pretty sure I could send him to virtually any school in the district (which cover a huge area) but we chose to stay local... and I don't live in some fancy neighbourhood. ;)

~♥Little Miss - posted on 03/04/2012

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And one more thing, the reason public schools in poverty stricken areas are not equipped to handling certain circumstances is directly linked to lack of funding, which means less teachers, and less programs to offer the students.

Mother - posted on 03/04/2012

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"EXACTLY! Some people are not going to be good at homeschooling. THEN they would TRULY fall through the cracks."

-- there are alternatives. There is virtual learning. There is webcast learning. There is tutoring systems[that costs money]. Where there is a will...there is a way.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 03/04/2012

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@ Rebecca "If the system is broken, it is going to take a LONG time to fix it. What then is the best situation for the kids who are not able to be taught at home? "



EXACTLY! Some people are not going to be good at homeschooling. THEN they would TRULY fall through the cracks.

~♥Little Miss - posted on 03/04/2012

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I feel using the blanket statement that all public schools suck, is just not accurate. Unfortunately yes it is based on income and where you live. That is a shame. But this charter school was specifically opened up in a low income area to stimulate better education, and expectations. But I will tell you what, the administration keeps saying things like "all the parents here want a great education for their children, and we are all here because we care about how our children are learning and growing" BOLD FACE LIE! I have seen so many parents not give a flying shit, and strictly use this charter school as a place to put their kids. They are not active whatsoever within the school. Some parents frankly don't give a shit and blame whatever school their kids are in for behavioral problems, failing grades, and lack of social skills. When quite frankly, that lies on the parents lap.



*edited to add* and quite frankly if the charter school never existed, and their children were in the shitty public schools that are in this district, they would still be better off going to the shitty public school than being homeschooled.

Mrs. - posted on 03/04/2012

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So, Kate, if that's true, if the system is f'd and great education is the exception...and this is with people who spend a great deal of time learning how to teach in teaching school....is the better alternative for one parent, who might not even have any inclination to teach, to give up their career and homeschool their child?



I can see how that works if one parent enjoys teaching and is good at it, but what about the other ones who are much better at providing for their family outside of the home?



It seems the system might be broken, but the question is, what is the best way to make do with what we have?



Now each child might thrive in different situations, but each family does not always have the resources to get their child in that position.



If the system is broken, it is going to take a LONG time to fix it. What then is the best situation for the kids who are not able to be taught at home?

Jenni - posted on 03/04/2012

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From what I remember, public schools offered special programs to both challenge students who were advanced in certain subjects and provide extra help and one on one experience for those who were struggling or had special circumstances. I'm not saying that a child wouldn't benefit more from the homeschooling experience depending on the individual parent and child. Just having a difficult time believing that public schools are void of catering to individual children's needs.



I had some absolutely amazing, inspirational teachers and of course some older, bored, following their textbook teachers where I had to make the extra individual effort to do well in their class...... such is life. But I would say 90% of the time my teachers were great-excellent. I guess we all have our own individual experiences with public schools.

Kate CP - posted on 03/04/2012

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Unfortunately, yes, Montessori can get pricey. There are more and more charter schools opening up around the US, though. Some are good...some...not so much. To find a truly great Montessori school means taking a lot of time to research and observe classes and interrogate the director. ;)

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